An Economic Lesson From The First Christmas

@gewcew23 (8012)
United States
December 26, 2008 12:50pm CST
Let us begin with one of the most famous phrases: "There’s no room at the inn." This phrase is often invoked as if it were a cruel and heartless dismissal of the tired travelers Joseph and Mary. The reason the inns were full to in the entire Holy Land was because of the Roman emperor’s decree that everyone be counted and taxed. Inns are private businesses, and customers are their lifeblood. There would have been no reason to turn away this man and his bride. In any case, the second chapter of St. Luke tells of the charity of a single inn owner, perhaps the first person they encountered, who, was a capitalist. His inn was full, but he offered them what he had, a stable. There is no mention that the innkeeper charged the couple even one copper coin, though given his rights as a property owner, he certainly could have. Think about this when the Word was made flesh with the birth of Jesus, it was through the charitable work of a capitalist. The government did nothing for these poor couple except place burden upon them by forcing them to make the journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem.
1 person likes this
2 responses
@murderistic (2280)
• United States
26 Dec 08
Actually inns were not even buildings, they were large plots of lands with walls and no ceilings or floors. I'm guessing that because there was a census, the inns were very crowded, but not "full"... most likely, Joseph and Mary didn't want to have a child in that kind of crowded setting. I don't think that they were turned away by anyone.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Dec 08
Also just because someone owned an inn didn't make them a capitalist... it just made them a business owner.
1 person likes this
@gewcew23 (8012)
• United States
26 Dec 08
A capitalist is a business owner, and when did inn not become building?
• United States
26 Dec 08
Not necessarily, societies require business owners, whether it be a communist or a socialist or a capitalist, people are going to own businesses. You don't know that person specifically and you don't know their economic philosophies to judge them in such a way, to me it just seems that you're trying to use this story to justify capitalism, which is kind of ridiculous. As for an inn not being a building, I'm just telling you what I have heard from historians and researchers. It was kind of a building but it wasn't an inn in the modern sense, there were no private rooms. It was just one big room with walls. Probably had no ceiling or floor.
@suspenseful (40326)
• Canada
26 Dec 08
So as I asked in the other discussion, did you want to get rid of Christmas and make the Bible prophecy of Isaiah wrong? Because if Caesar Augustus had not made the decree that all the World had to be taxed and if it was not Roman Law that you had to go to the place where your ancestors lived, Christ would have been born in Nazareth and the Bible be proved wrong and you know Gn-- would be jumping up for joy. So no matter your reasoning that it was horrible that those innkeepers were so full that Joseph and Mary had to go to a Stable to spend the night, and that other innkeeper was nice and did not charge them a cent (how do you know if maybe Joseph's relatives there did not come in the next day and pay the rent?) it was nothing to do with charity. That innkeeper saw that Mary, who was probably was about thirteen at the time, was about to give birth and he did not want the scandal of a young girl dying in child birth on his hand, not when he knew that Joseph and also Mary were both descendants of King David.