South Carolina Public Schools Fight for Right to Return Prayer to The Classroom

United States
January 11, 2009 10:01pm CST
One year ago, the South Carolina Board of Education presented a case to the State Court to have prayer returned to the classroom. One year later, the fight continues on for the sacred right to make this a legal right of all South Carolina schools. I commend this state on fighting for something as sacred that should have never been taken away in the first place. If it were not for the Atheist organizations, prayer would still be an essential part of every American school ciriculum.
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6 responses
• United States
13 Jan 09
I do not see it actually happening. There are too many students of different religious beliefs and cultures to ever make it work. Someone would end up getting offended and tons of trouble would come from it.
2 people like this
• United States
14 Jan 09
It should not matter what religion you are, prayer is a common sense thing that sets everyone free, just ask a man who has committed a vile act against another human being - and surely you will see that it is all the same one entity.
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@laydee (12814)
• Philippines
14 Jan 09
No it's not impossible. We've done it many times. Students are different from the adults, students are open to new things and are not easily offended. With proper guidance from the teachers and educators it could work. Lack of spirituality is what's wrong with the young people of today. Adults are their only venue of learning and most adults they meet or talk to (outside of the school) are too defensive of their own religions and would ridicule those unlike theirs, that's why these uneducated virtues are transferred from adult to the young generation. But, if religion is actually given the chance to flourish (with proper guidance of teachers) students would then be given proper understanding and information, thus making them fully get the meaning instead of 'assumptions' from their adult friends. What we actually did when I was still at school was to let students lead the prayer during class. A short prayer of around 1minute. Each day, they choose a student with different religion, so there would be days when the Christians would lead the prayer, another days when the Muslim students would do it, and etc. It didn't actually create friction, because everyone respected the prayer leader. But I'm guessing it would be difficult to instill prayer with the older kids now because they didn't have the chance to learn about it when they were still younger. It's like feeding your kids junk food, you can't just convert them to healthy food in one night when they weren't given the chance to appreciate healthy food when they were still younger, right? Religion shouldn't have taken out of the school system in the first place.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Jan 09
Most excellent observation.
• Thailand
13 Jan 09
I am a teacher and as such will make you a promise. If you don't pray in my school I promise I won't think in your church.
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• United States
14 Jan 09
Thank you for your comment, indeed - in this world we live in prayer is one of the most important forms of spirituality we possess.
@laydee (12814)
• Philippines
14 Jan 09
What was that supposed to mean?
• United States
15 Jan 09
I think what Chiang is saying that if we do not let our children pray in American schools then how can we pray in church. It does seem hypocritical to have these awful restrictions placed on the public school system. This has placed a strain on the morale and ethics of how adolescent and teen behavior is valued in relation to God's law.
• United States
14 Jan 09
First, I am eclectic pagan and I "pray" (for lack of a better word) to my own gods. Second, Christians who don't force their beliefs on me or try to convert me don't bother me in any way and are free to live however they see fit as long as they allow me to do the same. Third, Christian prayers have absolutely no place in a public school system. If you want your child to be permitted to pray in an American school, send them to a religious private school. That's why they exist. This country is made up of people who follow practically every religion on the planet and to grant public schools the right to have Christian prayers (because that is what is meant by "prayer in school" - the phrase "prayer in school" has never included Muslim prayers or Jewish prayers or Shinto prayers) the schools should have to also provide prayer time for students of other religious beliefs. And if that were to happen, no one would ever do anything but pray. The First Amendment of the United States Constitution provides every citizen, school-aged children included, the freedom of speech, press and religion. As far as I am concerned sanctioning Christian prayer in public schools takes away the students' First Amendment freedoms, or at the very least degrades and belittles them.
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@laydee (12814)
• Philippines
14 Jan 09
Absolutely. What we actually did when I was still at school was ask students to lead the prayer. So, the prayer leaded didn't have to be Christian all the time, there were days when our Muslim students would lead, and other days when those practicing Judaism and other religion did the leading of the prayer. It actually unites students in a class better since we understood that we were diverse but not divided. Not practicing prayer only divides students because they're not even given the chance to present his/her religion, that's why there's confusion and ridicule. It's actually a good thing that schools be the venue where they could experience this since it's the best place for us to learn and be educated of what our questions would be and understand other people's diversities. The lack of understanding and exposure to the different types of religion creates the friction to people when they grow older, because they themselves have not understood other religions apart from theirs.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Jan 09
I disagree with crimsonladybug comment for one reason, God is all religions, the creator of everything that we know and breath. As far as the First Amendment is concerned; the addendum that was added into this proclamation was written to protect the rights of people that have been subjected to prejudice and miss-justice. It is quite sad to see that some people have little faith in God - everything that we are about as human beings is for a reason, and man will make their own laws completely disregaurding God's law and order. Without prayer and purpose - we are like dust in the wind that lives without purpose or direction.
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@deebomb (15323)
• United States
16 Jan 09
The first amendment states CONGRESS SHALL MAKE NO LAW RESPECTING AN ESTABLISHMENT OF RELIGION, OR PROHIBITING THE FREE EXERCISE THEREOF; OR ABRIDGING THE FREEDOM OF SPEECH, OR OF THE PRESS; OR THE RIGHT OF THE PEOPLE PEACEABLY TO ASSEMBLE, AND TO PETITION THE GOVERNMENT FOR A REDRESS OF GRIEVANCES.
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@Latrivia (2889)
• United States
13 Jan 09
Prayer is already allowed in American public schools, they just can't be led by school employees. This is fine and dandy with me, my tax payer dollars are supposed to be used to teach the children, not to hold prayer time. They can do that anywhere, anytime.
1 person likes this
• United States
14 Jan 09
No this is not true, during the Atheist forming an organization to ban prayer from American schools, students cannot pray to God or Jesus, nor can teachers hold a moment of silence. All of these wonderful traditions have been outlawed by a group of people that do not hold God or Jesus in their heart.
@Latrivia (2889)
• United States
14 Jan 09
No they haven't. I don't know about schools outside this state, but Texas schools still allow their students to hold prayer meetings, pray (silently) in class, and to have a moment of silence. In fact, when I graduated 3 years ago, we were REQUIRED to observe a moment of silence. Prayer has not been outlawed at all. Actually, it is mandated by our government that students be allowed to pray in schools. They just can't have teacher led prayer.
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@deebomb (15323)
• United States
16 Jan 09
The reason prayers were removed from the schools is because no one believed it would happen so not enough people did any thing to counter act those wanting it removed. It can still be a part of the school day. But the schools are afraid of the ACLU suing them and the expense to fight them.
@ladybug565 (2217)
• United States
12 Jan 09
I think if it is given as a right and not forced it is good. I think that prayer should be allowed but if a child chooses not to participate that should be ok too.
• United States
12 Jan 09
I believe strongly that a child most earliest influence is how their morale values are designed, this may be one of the reasons we have so many problems today in our present society. It seems as though no one wants to be responsible for what is happening with families and the structure of our school system. There was a time when it was not an option if a child choose to pray - it was more-so a privilege that was not taken for granted.
• United States
12 Jan 09
you make a very good point friend. I do wish that more parents would instill prayer into thier childs lives.
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