The handicapped in need

@bamakelly (5194)
United States
January 27, 2009 11:42am CST
There have been times in my life where I would see someone n a circumstance like with a wheelchair perhaps that needed a helping hand across a street and I would kindly oblige them without thought. Do you do the same thing for someone like that or do you feel that they might not want your help so you don't even bother?
1 response
• United States
7 Feb 09
I think I might know a little about this subject because both my wife and I are in wheelchairs. I have more use of my hands and arms than she does so I can sometimes hold a door open for a disabled person (or any lady since my dad taught me to be respectful to women). The key to helping the disabled is to first ask them if they would like your assistance. When my wife drives her power chair it helps her to keep one foot off the footrest. One day a guy without asking reached down and tried to put the foot back on the footrest. My wife said "no" but he kept trying, and she had to spin her chair around to get her foot away from the guy who tried to argue with her about how he was "helping" her get her foot back where it should be (according to his judgment). Once you've asked the disabled person if he or she would appreciate your help, if they say yes, the next thing to do is find out exactly what help they would like. What you might think they want may not be what would really be helpful and respectful to them. If somebody chooses not to accept your assistance then wish them a good day and go on your way. If a disabled person is rude to you for just asking, then just remember that rude people come in both the disabled and nondisabled varieties.
@bamakelly (5194)
• United States
7 Feb 09
Thank you for a very articulate response. I am sure that you and your wife have some things that you need a little extra help with but all in all it sounds like you try to live as independently as possible. I commend you both for that. You are so right. Nice people and not so nice people come in all varieties. We just have to be careful in the things we say and do when approaching certain individuals.
• United States
8 Feb 09
Yes, my wife and I do seek to live as independently as possible. We have our own apartment, and in the good weather we get out and about just the two of us. We live just outside the city of Boston and the buses and trains are all wheelchair accessible. For the things we can't do ourselves the first thing in the morning and then again in the evening we have attendants who come in for just as long as needed.