Foodmakers to Eliminate Some Brands

@rowantree (1190)
United States
February 17, 2009 8:29am CST
Kraft Foods announced it is discontinuing it's South Beach Living frozen entrees. It is also discontinuing it's Handi-Packs pudding but at the same time, introducing new flavors of the Jell-O pudding. Sara Lee Closed a plant that produced Best's Kosher, Sinai Kosher, Shofar and Wilno in January. Now selling the brands and facilities. Also eliminated a packaging size of Jimmy Dean sausage.Hopefully the closing of the kosher plants doesn't cause a problem. Eliminating a packaging size of sausage? Wow, what a death-defying move. H.J. Heinz Co. aims to cut product count 15 percent to 20 percent in two to three years. Went from 24 to 16 SKUs of ketchup in Europe when it instituted more common sizing. Cut a line of soups in England. I hope this doesn't hurt our ketchup consumption. My daughter likes to eat her dinner meat with ketchup, no matter how the meat is seasoned or breaded. I am guessing the line of soups in England weren't very popular? Campbell Soup Co. sold its Godiva and Australian salty snack businesses in 2008. Did you even know that Godiva had a salty snack business? I sure didn't. While they're at it, why don't they get rid of the Godiva coffee and the Godiva ice cream, too? J.M. Smucker Co. now owns the former Procter & Gamble Co. brands of Folgers coffee, Jif peanut butter and Crisco shortening. Now this is the only real alarming piece of news. Because nobody messes with my Jif peanut butter. Nobody. I don't know. It all just sounds to me like these companies are finally - and I do mean finally - trimming the excesses. It's a shame that it has taken a recession to do it, but at least it's getting done. Hopefully it stays that way. How do you feel about this? Do you think that there are way too many choices at the grocery store? Do you feel some companies go overboard in their offerings? I do. I think companies have gone overboard in offering way too many "convenient" type foods that it's gone beyond "convenient" and is now considered "ridiculous". I think it's finally time that the grocery store world finally caught up to the "being green" movement, don't you?
2 responses
@uicbear (1903)
• United States
17 Feb 09
I think this has more with cutting the product divisions that just aren't producing the profits. That's all business really counts. With the economy the way it is, people don't want to spend $6 on a frozen dinner. I would think choices at the store would be a good thing. That competition would help keep prices down. But I sure don't see that when I go shopping. I don't know if all this is gonna help in keep prices atleast where there at, but I hope to see it.
@rowantree (1190)
• United States
18 Feb 09
Oh this is definitely about cutting business losses, that's for sure. I didn't mean to imply it was anything but. I agree with you, people don't want to spend $6 for a frozen dinner. But I did want to mention in my post that by businesses cutting the fat, it helps the environment and this has been a long time coming and I'm happy to see even a little bit.
@TLChimes (4842)
• United States
17 Feb 09
Yep... I agree. Being green means cutting out the stuff that isn't working, the extras. I also think they should find away to cut the price we feel at the register. Good to see you posting!
@rowantree (1190)
• United States
18 Feb 09
Hiya! :)