Nature Based Religion

United States
February 22, 2009 11:00pm CST
It took my a long time to come to this... but that is basicly what I say to sum things up now. I believe that all is connected and held together through nature. And nature carries us forward and nature holds us back. Things that happen in life that are not a result of nature (Much of society and governmental groups) aren't what nature intends. For this reason I don't agree with abortion, if nature felt we shouldn't have the child we would miscarry or not be pregnant in the first place. There is much I still am learning, that was just an example because someone asked me since I would pagan how could I not agree with abortion... well, that's why. I don't really consider myself pagan, just nature based. Haha. I'm still learning more about what nature wants from us. You have to be still and quiet in her beauty to know how best to live in accordence to her wishes. Does anyone else believe like this?
8 responses
• United States
17 Mar 09
You sound like you'd like the Transcendentalists of early America, people such as Emerson and Thoreau. They were very much a Spiritualist, and very rooted in Nature. And they were very much into social reform, which seems to come from those who have a clear understanding of Nature. My husband was told years ago by a dear friend that he reminded him of a Student of Life. The term wasn't coined by my dear husband, but he did work it into our paradigm. I grew up Roman Catholic, married my first husband and became a Baptist, and after I left that abusive marriage I went on the hunt for something that didn't condone abuse. The first Pagan religion I came across was Wicca but it wasn't for me for many reasons. I then met my husband and began studying many mystery traditions, as well as other religions such as Buddism and Hinduism. It's how I came to be initiated into the Student of Life paradigm. Several years ago I was initiated as a High Priestess, and I do hold for legal reasons ordination as a minister through the ULC. I'm a mother, yet for many years, almost 10 I've been treated as the "Wise Woman" by most who come to me, so I'm just now getting comfortable with that position in my life's journey. I have studied my Wolf Medicine and do quite a bit with it as well. I suppose over all, this life of Nature and being one with her sometimes is best had when we don't limit ourselves to a title, denomination, etc. If that makes sense. Some of the best lessons are learned without dogma and doctrine. And yes, I think that we have a great deal to learn from Nature, as she's selective about who can hear her, and who is willing to listen. Namaste-Anora
1 person likes this
• United States
17 Mar 09
Yes, I have tried putting a lable to my 'religion' for many years. Then it hit me, 'religion' is too much work! It's all about trying to make yourself better about doing everything perfectly. And I don't want to be that person at all! I think that whatever we choose to follow should compliment and work with us and better us because of who we are... not who we are trying so hard to attain to be. Make sense? Haha. Thanks for your response. I've seen your posting around mylot and you always did seem to ring very true when I read your words. Haha, now I guess I know why, we hold similer view points. Haha.
• United States
18 Mar 09
Yes, that makes a lot of sense. Thanks for the neat post. I'm sort of catching older ones as I make my way around lol, so much to see! Namaste-Anora
@kraven2 (21)
• Netherlands
23 Feb 09
I think the band Skyclad said it best so a quote: "I a human, I was meant to be the ultimate machine. With the power at my fingertips to realise my dreams. Homosapien, the master race, nature's pride and joy. Taking all the world will give me and what it won't I shall destroy" I think that pretty much sums it up.
• United States
24 Feb 09
I don't totally see where you are going with that, care to elaberate?
• Netherlands
27 Feb 09
I thought that was obvious. My point is that the whole nature thing is against the nature of mankind. In essence we are a virus occupying a place, consuming all the resources and then we move on. religion doesn't enter the equation IMHO. Then again I am an Atheist so religion from my point of view is just an invention of man, designed to explain what can not be explained at that point in time.
@Arkie69 (2156)
• United States
23 Feb 09
I consider myself a Christian But I agree with what you are saying. God put man on this earth to live hand in hand with nature. In fact God set everything up where Mother Nature will always have the last word. A study of the Animal Kingdom will tell you a lot about the things we are doing wrong. Man is nothing more than a more intelligent animal. (Some of us at least). The very same rules that govern the animal world also rules mankind. The Animals are just a lot better at sticking to God's plan for them than man is. If we held Mother Nature's hand, and God's, as we walked through this life we wouldn't have nearly the problems we do now. We would eat more of what we are supposed to and we would live longer with a lot less sickness. In man's mind he has always known a lot more about what he should do than Nature or God. This is just one of our many huge problems. Art
• United States
23 Feb 09
I agree with what you have said. God is in nature. He is in everything we do and everything we are around. I'm a christian too. My last semester of college I took a course called the sociology of religion. We studied all different types of faiths. I loved this class because it opened my eyes to things I didn't know about. I was already tolerate of others believes but this class made me see how all regilions, article of faiths or what ever you want to call your belief system, we all have more in common than we realize.
@Arkie69 (2156)
• United States
24 Feb 09
I don't get upset with other beliefs like a lot of people do. I believe there are good people that are doing the best they can with what they have to work with in all religions. I can't help but believe God will give these people credit no matter what they believe. I don't think any of us have it exactly right. We do the best we can with what we have been taught. Art
@ulalume (714)
• United States
23 Feb 09
While I agree with you fundamentally (and likewise, Pagans in general), I do not think you are taking into account the entire essence of "nature." Nature is not simply trees, wind, water, and similar elements; but essentially a piece of everything (the "spirit" of everything). I think some people could justify abortion because it is human nature to defend their own well being (and understandably, a child at the wrong time could practically destroy the mothers life on so many levels). I think any "religion" can support and not support any thing, all depending on what scripture or ideas cross a persons mind.
• United States
24 Feb 09
Some may refer to nature as the spirit of a man... but I don't view that as part of my path. I would not say that the nature of a serial killer is justified because it is ingrained into his psyhcy to do what he does. When I speak of nature I'm refering to the essence of the world around us, the seasons, the way the world opperates untouched my civalizations hands. We have mucked up a lot with our so called 'knowledge' pouring poisens into our bodies to cure illnesses. I'm not saying taking medication is wrong in all aspects, but we depend on their rightness far too much! Anyhow, that's off the subject againt. I don't think I'm just trying to support myself, because I don't need to support my thoughts and views on life. This is where life has brought me and my answers to life are not the same as they are for others.
@Galena (9123)
23 Feb 09
Paganism doesn't have a general stance on abortion. I'm sure every Pagan has an opinion one way or the other, but it's not because of their religion but because of their personal beliefs about the subject. so to say that as a Pagan you should agree with abortion is just plain stupid. was the person that said this Christian, perhaps? only there seems to be the general Christian stance against abortion, and also a general perspective from Christianity that if they think something is bad, then the Pagans must be all for it.
• United States
23 Feb 09
I'm not sure what people are thinking. Haha. I'm not really one to consider myself pagan either. I think that is the closest 'religion' I come to... but I don't like to label myself. I also don't like to push my views on others. I state what I think and listen to what others think but I'm not going to try to convince them that I am right. It's not really my place. So, maybe that was a bad example to bring it, it sure ruffled a few feathers! But, that was just one instance. There are other cases where I view nature very strongly. I tend to take an earthier approach to parenting as well. Haha.
• United States
23 Feb 09
I definitely agree with a more nature based religion than I do the religions that separate themselves from nature. We are practically animals after all. We are a part of nature and to fight to take ourselves away from nature is pretty stupid. Abortion, now I can't say I agree with it entirely, but I do think in extreme cases, abortion should be an option. I don't see how that conflicts much with a nature based religion. However, everyone is entitled to their own opinions.
@TLChimes (4842)
• United States
17 Mar 09
One thing you can look into is called Spiritual Humanist. It's nature science based. It also allows you to believe as you feel in most respects. It works for some and doesn't for others and like other "faiths" it has different views with in it's self. I am a pagan because I am not a traditional Christin. I follow a nature based faith. I am an ordained S.H. but no longer attend my local services because there were to many political conflicts that didn't fit with my faith.
@egr134 (193)
• Argentina
25 Feb 09
I think that may happen sometimes, as I have some native beliefs I think sometimes like that.