Easter Weekend... Time For The Third and Final Part of Our Walk...

The Reconstructed Well - This is believed to be an old Saxon well which was uncovered whilst digging the foundations for the new cricket pavilion. It's 90 feet deep but a false metal bottom has been inserted close to the top, to save accidents.
@Darkwing (21588)
April 10, 2009 3:08pm CST
It's Easter Weekend, and I guess it's as good a time as any to take the third and final part of our walk! You all ready to move on? Good... then, let's set off on the last part of our walk, heading once again toward the Garden Centre, along the tree-shaded path beside the main road. We turn left, where the church, school and cricket club are signposted, and head on up the gradient of the lane, which is quite dark in the shade of the umbrella of tall trees. We head on up the hill, and a huge, turquoise dragonfly zooms towards us. Is it a dragonfly or could it be something less worldly, like a faerie? Whatever it is, it seems to be leading us, stopping inches from our foreheads and suddenly turning and heading away from us again, repeatedly. Its colours are beautiful... a deep turquoise coloured body with black, lacy wings, so delicate which hardly appear to move as it flies in front of us. We reach the top of the hill, passing the vicarage in full view of the cricket pavilion, where we sit on a log and admire the open view. The cricket field is skirted by huge trees and down in the corner, rabbits are taking their evening sustenance before night falls. The ballons are getting lower, preparing to land, as the cricketing batsman weather vane moves idly to the left and right in the slight breeze. Crows are pecking away at the cricket square. I don't know what they're feeding on... possibly bugs or seeds in the grass. There are three of them... perfectly black and hopping around excitedly on the quiet field. We get up from the log and cross the lane by the school, admiring this very old building which in school time, houses around one hundred pupils. The old Saxon well stands on the field opposite, adorned with flower baskets, having been uncovered during the building of the pavilion and newly sited, in brickwork. The great oak tree stands just inside the playground wall, with the pupils' bird box attached to it, and the “pencil fence” marks the line of the picnic garden where the children eat. We move down onto the path through the cemetery, as the church clock strikes a half-past eight, after ringing out two bars of the evening reveille. We wander through the cemetery, amidst a variety of headstones, including Celtic crosses, wooden crosses where the gypsies rest, and the great family tomb of the Huthe family, whose head build Wykehurst Place, a Gothic style building in the village which was used for Hammer House of Horror films. Working our way around to the south entrance to the church, we see, on the Saxon chapel wall, an old sundial, without an arm. It's believed that this used to be used to tell the time for church services, when they used to insert a stick into the hole, and tell the time by the shadow which was cast. The big, oak doors are closed now, so we can't go inside, and as we make our way down the hill towards the lychgate, we see the heart-shaped chair which the local woodman cut from a tree he felled, and which has been used in many a wedding photograph. We pass huge, old tombs which stand some three feet off the ground, as well as narrow beams of concrete, headed and footed by small, concrete stones, as we pass the cypress trees and laurel and reach the lychgate. Down a few steps we pass through the lychgate, walking across one of the old millstones, which has been laid into the pathway. There are a few very old cottages here, which at one time were a blacksmith's smithy and a stable block, and opposite these, stands the pub, with it's sign boasting eight, bronze coloured bells; the number of bells in the church. This is the end of our summer evening walk. I think we all need a rest now. We'll go sit in the garden and take a glass of wine, a beer or a lager, or maybe even a cup of coffee if you wish, and talk about our walk, whilst relaxing and getting our breath back. If you're peckish, you could order a grill to enjoy with your drink, and watch the sun go down as we enter into dusk, and the lights come on under the huge garden parasol covering the rustic, gothic-type tables and benches. Then, you'll see the moon, which has only just begun to wane, rise up behind the church, as it shines through the trees and bathes the whole area you've just walked, in a silver-blue magickal light. I hope you've enjoyed your three-part walk. We'll do it again sometime, but head in a different direction. There are many footpaths around here and many different things to see. Enjoy your wind-down, and thank you for joining me.
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2 responses
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
10 Apr 09
Okay, Darkwing, fire up that video camera so I can watch!
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@Darkwing (21588)
11 Apr 09
I did it already... beat you to it, my friend. I've been taking shots of the downs and the fields and woodland whilst we've been sitting. Brightest Blessings and thank you for your contribution.
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@mummymo (23707)
21 Apr 09
Trust me to be trailing along at the back end Darkwing but I did so enjoy this walk - it was the very thing I needed after the last few hectic weeks and not being able to move at all since the beginning of the weekend! I found the cemetery so peaceful and calming and those old celtic cross headstones really are magnificent. Just ordered my nice pint of ice cold lager and think we thoroughly deserve it! Thanks again honey and I am already looking forward to our next adventure! xxx
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@Darkwing (21588)
22 Apr 09
Lol!!! It's all that sloe GIN, so don't blame it on a hectic life! I can see one particular Celtic cross through the trees around the cemetery, from my kitchen window. When the sun comes up in the morning, it shines right through that particular cross. In fact, it doesn't matter what time of day it is, that particular cross always takes my attention. It's the only one I can see in the summer and the most prominent in the winter when the leaves have gone from most of the trees. There must be a reason for that. I tried to read the inscription one time, but it wasn't too clear and meant nothing to me, but I will go again soon. Brightest Blessings my friend. Have a Good Afternoon and thank you for your congtribution. xxx
@Darkwing (21588)
22 Apr 09
Sorry about the typos! It's a combination of my long nails and this danged laptop keyboard!
@mummymo (23707)
22 Apr 09
LOL Typos are the result of sloe gin too me thinks! lol xxxx
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