One Final Thought

@worldwise1 (14888)
United States
July 4, 2009 1:08pm CST
By now we are all probably tired of the sensationalism surrounding the death of Michael Jackson, but I do have one final thought I would like to share with everyone. A lot has been said about his alleged drug abuse, but I have many questions on that front. For all of those "friends" who are now so eagerly coming forward with stories relating to the subject, Why didn't any of you do something? Another fact that has been under-reported is that according to a source close to him, MJ did not use drugs to "get high." He suffered from pain and insomnia. I have struggled with insomnia for most of my life so I know how frustrating it can be. It has been bearable for me because I don't work outside of my home and can pretty much sleep whenever I get the chance. For someone with the commitments that MJ had, this would have been problematical. I am in no way excusing the overuse of drugs if that turns out to be the case, only differentiating between using them for recreational purposes and a misdirected need for them. He should have been counseled on the proper way to manage pain through taking other measures than using painkillers. Do you have, or have you ever had a condition which required you to use quite a bit of pain medication? I have, and believe me it is no picnic.
3 people like this
5 responses
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
5 Jul 09
I thought that he was in extreme pain and took one pill, but started to feel weak and drop into unconscious, that he tried to close the pill bottle (and they are a bother to close or open) and they spilled. The other scenerio is Michael started to feel weak and he needed the pill his doctor told him he had to take, but it was too late. He gets the pill bottle open, and before he can swallow the pill, he collapses, and the pills spill all over the floor. What he could have done to prevent this: If he was in extreme pain, he should have spoken to his doctor or if his doctor did not believe him, get a second opinion. Other thought is that heart attacks are more common with African Americans so he may have already had a high risk, his skin disease may have increased his chances, etc. See? No sensationalism, No "oh I know how he feels," etc. You see if I were not terrible at math or chemistry, I would have made a good nurse.
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
5 Jul 09
I guess you haven't really been reading the news well...Michael Jackson had a live in doctor who reportedly gave him a shot of Demerol...that triggered his low, shallow breathing until he became unconscious and suffered a heart attack and cardiac arrest--he actually had several doctors who probably each doled out prescriptions to Jackson and from what I heard he was a walking medicine cabinet with all kinds of medications...Oxydcone, Valium, Xanax, even Diprivan--Jackson also often got medications under aliases
2 people like this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
5 Jul 09
I wonder if that was really true about the doctor stating he didn't give him the Dimerol...he sure got a lawyer pronto...I guess we'll all find out when the official toxicology reports come in
2 people like this
@suspenseful (40316)
• Canada
7 Jul 09
Even if the doctor had injected him with demerol, that I doubt, Michael might have felt pain and took a pill and it was too late. Obviously some think that I blame Michael, but anyone could have a heart attack especially if they are prone to it. Also a doctor and a nurse could have been in the house, and Michael could have been in another room (I did not read the report, I am not a Michael Jackson hero worshipper - I did like that song he did when he first started though ) and the doctor could have been busy. I mean I have a husband who is an invalid and I am not by his side every second of the day. It seems that someone or a lot of people want to blame the doctor and the nurse instead of seeing for what it is, an unfortunate turn of events. And who knows whether this was Michael's first heart attack and unlike many who start to have them in their 50s the first one was fatal.
• United States
4 Jul 09
I have an all too intimate understanding of this. My mother had osteoarthritis in her lower back from ten years as a nuclear welding inspector and suffered insomnia. It wasn't until she'd had the osteoarthritis for 15 years that it was diagnosed incidentally on an MRI looking for another condition, before then she'd been given skeptical looks and prescriptions that weren't quite strong enough and no further treatment or tests. So, she started medicating herself. Eventually she managed to get on disability for what was now crippling back pain. When I was 19, she was put on a new cocktail of antidepressants, sleeping pills, and pain medicine that didn't interact well. You may have heard about ambien causing people to sleep walk/eat/drive and not remember anything that they've done. One night she took her nighttime medications repeatedly, forgetting that she'd taken them. I found her on the couch the next morning. Her autopsy showed that she'd suffered respiratory and cardiac arrest from the accidental overdose of pain medication. We need a better understanding of pain and how to manage it. We need doctors that actually look beyond the surface and don't just prescribe a bunch of medications without actually thinking about it. I think chronic pain might be the new stigmatized condition that mental illness used to be; it's not talked about, it's handled quietly and ineffectually, and people DIE. I myself have chronic kidney stones and though it's not a daily phenomena, the pain is excruciating and can last for up to a week. I never take the medication other than when I'm passing them, nor have I ever been tempted to (even before the passing of my mother) because I hate the way that the pills make me feel. Nausea, confusion, numbness. It's no picnic.
2 people like this
• United States
4 Jul 09
God, that's so ture, man. It's like pain, real pain, is seen as a random and trivial abberation and the seeking to comfort and lessen the pain is seen as a luxury and not a need. Pain is repeatedly being seen as an acceptable outcome, side effect, or symptom to a problem in that doctors don't see the pain itself as being harmful to the body. It's completely f*cked. No one should be treated like sh*t fo being in pain.
2 people like this
@worldwise1 (14888)
• United States
5 Jul 09
Thank you, Varviktel, for sharing your story with us about your mother, and also yourself. Chronic pain is very real. I know because I have had it for many years. No one wants to believe that it is that bad! Some doctors are even ignorant about pain and how to treat it.
1 person likes this
@FFFrocks (306)
• Canada
5 Jul 09
meliora, so true. I have also noticed that doctors very often aren't interested in addressing pain in an appopriate manner. Much easier to just write a prescription and send the patient on their way.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (117159)
• Boise, Idaho
4 Jul 09
The same reason why this same thing happens in so many situations across the world. The user becomes so good acting 'okay' that even people very close to them don't really know or want to believe that the user is over using. You don't really want to believe the reality of the situation. It isn't any picnic. He was in alot of pain. Easy to get hooked. And if he was suffering from insomnia it was probably a relief when people near him saw that he was sleeping. Was it because the meds kicked in or had he taken too much of the pain meds? Hard for a person to know.
2 people like this
@celticeagle (117159)
• Boise, Idaho
5 Jul 09
I think the police are checking into just that.
1 person likes this
@lelin1123 (15645)
• Puerto Rico
4 Jul 09
He began taking painkillers after his hair caught on fire during a pepsi commercial. At that point is when someone should have stepped in to guide him in dealing with pain. I blame all the Doctors, enablers, his father, and his suppose friends who didn't do anything to get him help. If I had been his mother or sister I would have intervened even if I had to trick him somehow into rehab. For so many people who supposely loved him they didn't love him enough to get him help. All they did was appease him and take his money. Now today we are all in mourning over another great talent gone to soon. Just like Elvis. We won't be dealing with this again because there is no one else in the world with the caliber of either Michael or Elvis and there never will be. Thanks for responding.
@worldwise1 (14888)
• United States
5 Jul 09
I really hope that there will be another great, gifted performer like them, lelin, but they are rare as a day in May. There's enough blame to go around, and I don't think that those who were enablers should or will get off lightly. The wheels have been set into motion to deal out justice to those who abuse their positions, and it's about time. If all goes well we may never again have to lose a beloved personality because of such unscrupulous people.
1 person likes this
@stephcjh (32328)
• United States
5 Jul 09
I have never had to use alot of pain medication but there are times when I wished I had alot to take when I was in pain. I was in alot of pain after giving birth to my daughter and after having my hysterectomy. The pain meds they gave me sure was not doing the job at all.
1 person likes this
@ClassyCat (1214)
• United States
5 Jul 09
I might add here, that we should all not take too much stock in what the ‘media’ reports – all of them are forever adding their own opinions into a report, and if they don’t like who they are reporting on, they will make the person look bad in the story. I have to agree with Michael, when he commented about the British tabloid (I believe it was), that gave him the term: ”wacko-jacko” – that was a very cruel and demeaning term. I believe that Michael had as much or even more pain within, that he didn’t know how to deal with as well. May he rest in peace, and I hope that something good comes out of all of this that will prevent people from getting into this type of a situation so easily. Enablers and greedy doctors should be dealt with.
1 person likes this