Would you eat seafood?

@jedopi (401)
Canada
July 7, 2009 7:49pm CST
If you are vegetarian, do you eat seafood of any kind? My doctor told me that I should be eating at least salmon for my health. I held out as long as I could but if my doctor told me to eat it, I felt that I should listen to her. I only have seafood maybe once or twice a month, but I still feel guilty when I eat it. I only gave up meat two years ago so I haven't been vegetarian for very long. I would like to know what others feel about the subject. I know vegans would never eat fish but what about other vegetarians here on mylot?
1 person likes this
3 responses
• United States
8 Jul 09
Hi! I am vegan, so of course I don't eat fish, but I do have a suggestion. The only thing fish have that other meat does not that is beneficial is Omega-3 fatty acids. You can get these in many vegetarian/vegan food these days, such as vegan Natural Balance brand butter, some soymilk is enhanced with it, and walnuts have it naturally. Omega-3 fatty acids actually come from the plant matter that fish eat. Doctors usually only have less than one credit hour of nutrition and diet classes throughout their entire schooling career, so he's most likely not educated on the other sources of Omega-3s. The other thing is that if you do not eat meat but eat dairy and chicken or fish (or both), you are not vegetarian but instead a pescetarian. I see this confused so often, but I think people just get confused over the terms and their meanings. So the answer to your question would be no, no vegetarian eats seafood. Haha. I hope I've helped you in some way. :)
@jedopi (401)
• Canada
8 Jul 09
My doctor said that I needed the salmon because of my Vitamin D level and not for the Omega -3s. Do you know of any other non-animal based foods where I could get the extra vitamin d? I do take a supplement but it is still too low. Why does it seem that everyone is so confused on what vegetarian actually means. Vegan is easy - no animal products whatsoever. If you are saying that vegetarians are the same then what is the point of having a different name from vegans. There are some "vegetarians" that eat fish, but not eggs or dairy, some that have eggs but not fish or dairy, and others that have dairy but not fish or eggs. All I know is that I gave up meat (that includes any land animal/bird) two years ago, and that is good enough for me right now. People keep trying to get me to go back to eating it, but I don't want to. As I said I only started eating fish again because of my doctor's advice, but I do still have eggs and dairy once in awhile.
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Jul 09
Hello again! Vitamin D is best absorbed through the body as sunlight. 10 minutes of direct sunlight a day (with no sunscreen because UV rays is what starts the Vitamin D process within the body) will give you very near 100% of this vitamin. There are exceptions to this rule; if your body cannot synthesize the vitamin very well, you won't get 100% from sunlight, or if you live in some highly north areas of the world you won't get as much at certain times either. Food sources that are vegetarian of Vitamin D include milks of any kind (dairy, soy, almond, etc.), soy margarines, etc. No, a vegetarian is not the EXACT same thing as a vegan. A vegan is going the whole way, a "pure" vegetarian if you will. I'm going to put a list here so I don't confuse you: Vegan: No meat (fish and chicken as well), dairy, honey, eggs, animal ingredients, or animal products including silk, leather, etc. Lacto-ovo vegetarian: This is what most people think of when they think of the generic word "vegetarian." This vegetarian eats no meat (including beef, poultry and fish) but does eat both eggs and dairy. Lacto vegetarian: No meat, no eggs, but does eat dairy. Ovo vegetarian: No meat, no dairy, but does eat eggs. Pescetarian: No beef or pork, may eat fish and/or chicken. Flexitarian/Semi-vegetarian: For those who never can find it in themselves to go the whole way, this describes those who usually go with a vegetarian diet (any kind), but occasionally eat meat. Many regular vegetarians that aren't to veganism yet also watch out for animal ingredients in foods and avoid certain products made with animals. Before I went vegan, for example, I avoided milk but not all dairy, animal ingredients, and animal products such as leather. It's up to the person as to what all they avoid, but I hope the above list will help.:)
1 person likes this
@momz2gd (295)
• United States
12 Jul 09
great answer
@momz2gd (295)
• United States
12 Jul 09
I know that Silk brand soy milk has vitamin D in it. It has 30% of vitamin D, in fact it has 5% more than regular milk. Some Cereals are fortified, check boxes, sunlight.
• United States
13 Jul 09
I'm glad you mentioned that Silk actually has more of the vitamin. I've noticed it's much easier getting the vitamins and minerals I need as a vegan. Believe it or not, I was told I needed more iron in my diet when I was a meat eater (which made my parents even angrier when I went vegan, because they thought I was going to make it worse). I was not "anemic yet" is what the doctor told me. Soon after I went vegan my mom made an appointment for me to get bloodwork done because she really thought I was making myself worse. The results came back that I was getting a little over the norm of iron, but not too much to worry about. When you go vegetarian and/or vegan and actually do it right, you find yourself researching nutrition and knowing more than the average person because all the hype of how it's bad not to eat meat. I went to school for dietetics (the study of nutrition), and was the only vegan in one of the first nutrition classes I took. I couldn't believe most of the people were meat eaters...in a nutrition class! Being vegan for years beforehand definitely set me up for it, though. I had one of the top grades in the class. Sorry for ranting, but what you said definitely made me think back to these points in my life. People come too accustomed to associating meat with protein and iron, and dairy with calcium. No wonder we have such high rates of osteoperosis, heart disease, and cancer. :(
1 person likes this
@momz2gd (295)
• United States
13 Jul 09
You can get iron from dark green leafy veggies, such as spinach, nuts and seeds, soy products. You probably getting more than an meat-eater. After all, vegans concentrate on grains, veggie, and fruits. Going Veg is way better and better for the poor conditions of animals. You don't have a constant stream of hormones and antibiotics. here is a site that can make you happy check it out: These are things at everyday grocery stores such as pop tarts, pie shells. While some of these choices aren't necessarily the healthiest, they are great!!! http://www.peta.org/accidentallyVegan/default.asp
1 person likes this
@momz2gd (295)
• United States
13 Jul 09
If you are interested I can share a few simple recipes!! Let me know!!
1 person likes this
@Bethany1202 (3433)
• United States
22 Jul 09
I don't eat seafood. I rarely eat dairy, although I am not vegan. I have been vegetarian for almost twenty years without any meat or seafood and am very healthy. You should see another doctor and get a second opinion if you're still worried. It's not necessary for humans to eat flesh of any kind. There are so many other foods out there that can provide the same "benefits" as seafood.