Here Are Some Common Sense Tips

United States
July 16, 2009 3:39pm CST
for visiting people in the hospital. I read this in an issue of "In Touch" Ministries magazine, and it has been helpful to me. 1) Phoning someone is a common courtesy before dropping in on people at home, but for some reason is often overlooked when it comes to hospital visits. The patient will have the advantage that allows them time to put on a robe or straighten their cover before you show up. 2) It's a hospital, not a hotel, and people go there to heal and rest, so it's good to stop at the nurses' station first - as the patient may be asleep, half dressed or undergoing therapy.
1 person likes this
5 responses
@rainmark (4306)
16 Jul 09
Hi Clutterbug. Yeah that's a good tip. I and my hubby always phoning our friends before dropping in on thier house. To asks if it's okay to visit them or if they are at home. Coz they might do something else important. Then when we go visit hospital, we always stop at nurses station, to tell we going to visit the patient. Happy posting.
• United States
16 Jul 09
You and your hubby are a rarity, as there are many people who just barge into a hospital room as though they're entitled. Your post has restored my faith in some of mankind, lol. Thanks for stopping in!
@thea09 (18327)
• Greece
16 Jul 09
Hi clutterbug, people here do not visit people in hospital. Let me clarify that, they move in with them. The patient's whole family (minus young children) will be there bedside with a rotation through the night. This means there is constant noise so the patient never sleeps. The families move in with their vast array of cleaning fluids and thoroughly clean the area around the patients bed, produce ice water and socialise with the other family members if a Dr happens to remove them into the waiting area for a while. Obviously the nurses are aware this will happen so apart from doling out medicines they do not engage in actual nursing as it is generally thought of. The relatives of said patient will go out of their way to help in any way the poor soul who is in there without any family gathered constantly around the bed.
• United States
16 Jul 09
That is interesting. If I were a patient in the hospital, I would want peace and quiet, and only my hubby visiting. Thanks for the details, I had no idea.
@morgandrake (2140)
• United States
16 Jul 09
Huh. I have thought about this before. Then again, I have never visited anyone while they were in the hospital either. In my defense, I would like to state that the people I have known (relatives, etc) who end up in the hospital have short visits. I end up going to their house after they get home. Actually that is how me and my wife got reinvolved (we quit dating for awhile).
• United States
16 Jul 09
Hi morgandrake, Believe it or not, there as some people who have no idea of hospital etiquette. You are smart enough to know better, but some people don't even think before they head off to the hospital. Thanks for dropping in!
@doggyhouz (548)
• United States
17 Jul 09
I may agree if you are plannin on visiting a friend. But if you visitin your family members then i dont see why i need to do that. I understand it is cortesy but i think we seen more of their true colors then them layin in bed half naked. But that is a great tip still if your visitng a friend down the line plus you should check on their status of health if it is your family member. Plus inform other close people if someone entered the hospiyal Godbless
@khayshenz (1387)
• United States
17 Jul 09
Those are great tips! I'll keep them in mind. I usually call to check what the room number is and what-not. And lately, they have stations (not nurses, but volunteers) that asks where you wanna go and what floor or who you want to visit, stuff like that. A lot of times - the ones that I visit in the hospital are family/related to me. So by the time I get there (to the hospital room) it's already overflowing with people. That's why I don't check with the nurse to see if the patient is resting, etc. Come to think, I've never visited a non-family (friend or otherwise) in the hospital. *shrugs*