What Is Some Of The Weirdest Assumptions People Make About Your Ethnic Group?

@pyewacket (44036)
United States
August 1, 2009 10:29pm CST
I was answering another discussion when this popped in my mind. Each and everyone of us belong to an ethnic or nationality group (or maybe many as I do) and people do have certain assumptions or notions about what that ethnic/nationality group has as far as customs, habits, whatever, and many are stereotypical--for instance some may think of those from the "Latin" groups as hot-headed, the British being stiff-upper-lipped and so forth Well it got me thinking about one of my ethnic/nationality groups I belong to....Native American. For some reason, even now, Native Americans are viewed as rather exotic and this has been the case since Columbus landed and some of the stereo=types of Native Americans haven't vanished in all these years. When people find out I have "Native" blood in me...don't ask the wacky questions I get, like: 1). What's your name? (If they don't know it and they have just met me say waiting on line in a supermarket). When I tell them...they're disappointed that I have a "normal" name...they were expecting me to say Dawn Rainfeather--or Ahshemah WhiteDeer (Ahshemah means sister in Shawnee) 2). What reservation are you from? Uh...like yo...not all of us are from reservations..many of us have been city dwellers for generations. 3). Are you from Arizona? (I get asked this as I wear a lot of Native American turquoise/silver jewelry) When I say no, I wear "Indian" jewelry since I'm part Native American...and the wackiest reply to that was from this elderly woman, who then said..."Oh, I could tell from your "Nez" and she pointed to her nose Translation: In the northwest USA are the Nez Pierce Indians..they were called that by the French in the early days as Nez means nose in French and Pierce (Pierced)..as they had pierced noses...Now why did this woman say "Nez" and point to her nose...she was referring to the face that Native Americans have large noses (another stereotype...and NO I DON'T HAVE A BIG NOSE)!!! The oddest question was one I got though was some years ago and it was connected with death. Now yes, in ages gone by some Native American nations had their own way of handling a dearly departed one....the Sioux for instance did construct scaffolds and placed the dead on top of them and some customs centuries ago, meant self-mutilation of oneself when a person died--but for the most part most Native Americans did bury their dead...others like the Navajo, even to this day let an outsider handle funerary arrangements as they still have a fear of the dead. So anyway, a rather young gal I had known for awhile, just had the loss of her father and was naturally grieving. She asked me..."What do Native Americans do when a person dies?" I know she was expecting some grandiose, exotic answer for me....and I tried not to laugh in her face..but I simply said, "We bury them." So--okay folks...what weird notions, concepts, stereotypical beliefs do people have about your ethnic/nationality group...does it offend you, make you laugh...what? As for me? I just laugh...uh, what can you expect from washechu? (Uh, that's Sioux for white man) LOL
9 people like this
20 responses
@AmbiePam (48173)
• United States
2 Aug 09
Could it be New York or those states up north? Maybe because I'm in Oklahoma that I can't imagine anyone asking a Native American those questions. At least people who live here. I can't say anything about visitors or people newly arrived from other states. I mean, our state is so entrenched in the Native American culture, that to ask someone their name expecting "Cloud Dancing" would be insane. Of course, even asking that in New York is still insane to me. I'm 1/8 Indian, a lot of German, some English, and a little bit of something else. So I don't know that I get stereotyped as an ethnic group. I have noticed people think since I'm on disability I must never have gone to school, must never have attended college, and must have never worked a real job in my life. That stuns me. To be stereoyped by my ethnic group would hurt way more than that.
2 people like this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
3 Aug 09
Actually my particular borough of the NYC area has the largest population of Native Americans--at least that is what I remember reading somewhere--also there is the Shinnecock Indians of Long Island who are still battling it out for recognition of their Native status---the thing that has been hindering in recognition is that they don't "look" Native American...many of the runaway slaves from down south during the Civil War intermarried with many of the northern tribes (even the Pequot of Connecticut...they're the ones that own that famous Foxwoods Resort)--so yes, do have African-American blood, but nonetheless are as fiercely proud of their Native culture While I was in college I took an anthropology course on Native American cultures...did that ever open up my eyes as I never realized just HOW many cultures there are---I saw you mention you're part Cherokee....the fact that you're in Oklahoma meant your ancestors survived the Trail Of Tears of the 1840s where they originated from the southern area of the US, like Georgia and the Carolinas--from what I understand there are markers all along the original route to remember those that didn't survive Cloud Dancing? LOL...I remember that was the name of the one character in Dr. Quinn Medicine Woman
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
3 Aug 09
It DOES hurt to be 'stereotyped by your ethnic group' if you are not.. well... ethnic. I'm not so it is a constant hassle for people to ask me stuff related to ethnicity. It's almost like walking around with a large spot on your shirt that you don't really notice but everybody else does. It's like... why the heck - everybody around me has a spot on THEIR shirt too, but because mine is a different color, I get the attention. I don't get it. I was telling my best friend today (she is of english descent, and she is white but she tans) that if someone wouldn't just walk up to her and ask HER where she's from, they shouldn't ask ME either. She says NOBODY has ever asked her where she's from. That's my point!
2 people like this
@AmbiePam (48173)
• United States
3 Aug 09
Okay, you got me. Cloud Dancing is from Dr. Quinn. I loved that show.
1 person likes this
• United States
2 Aug 09
I'm Haitian and whenever I tell someone that, the most popular question is "So you're from Africa?" Well, my roots are and while some of them are of European descent also. But I was born in Haiti. The Caribbean. Another thing some others ask me (others who have met another Haitian or have heard stories) it is "You Haitian girls are scary!" I was shocked and I asked him why and he said, "I heard that this woman got mad at her husband for cheating and she chopped off his --" Well, you get the idea. I was just standing there, staring at him!
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
2 Aug 09
How insulting of that person...I guess that guy got that impression since "supposedly" the misconception is that Haitians are into voodoo--I kind of bring that up since I happen to follow the Pagan/Wiccan path...so people are under the impression I'm casting charms and spells against them all the time...
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (96707)
• Marion, Kansas
2 Aug 09
Now we know how poorly geography is being studied. I at least knew where Haiti is and knew that it was NOT Africa. Those are some silly assumptions.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Aug 09
Awesome! At least I know that there are still some knowledgeable people around. Like you guys! You know, it wouldn't hurt people to just do a little research instead of using other people's opinions as their own.
1 person likes this
2 Aug 09
Hi pye, I think these people watch too many western movies. I for one is part Italian part English part French part Candian and part Burmies, some people think I'm Spanish,m lol! and when I get angry, people say oh! thats the Italian in me, but when I tell them I was born in Burma as my fathers's father when out there and thats how I came to be born when my fater meeet my mother whose father was an Italian who married my grandmother who was a nurse in Burma, theat just simply say where is that, hard explaining sometimes. Bright Blessings. Tamara
2 people like this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
3 Aug 09
Wow--you're a real mixture of ethnic groups--I often think it's my Irish/Scottish side of me that gets me going as far as anger..LOL
@eichs1 (1934)
• Philippines
2 Aug 09
I think the internet made us more knowledgeable about places and culture. But then, when I first mentioned to an online acquaintance that I am from the Philippines, he asked where is the Philippines located. It's a bit frustrating when others don't even care to look at the globe or at a map and try to remember some of the things written in it. But that is not the worst thing actually. When I was in college, I introduced myself as an Igorot from the Cordillera region (the northern side of the Philippines) lots of my school mates began asking me unthinkable questions. The worst one is when someone requested that I show them my tail!? Well, the Igorots are known for their g-string (a loin cloth) which others thought are tails. Here is a post in my blog detailing other misconceptions about my ethnicity. http://ayaysalidummay.blogspot.com/2009/07/cordillera-and-igorot-misconceptions.html
2 people like this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
3 Aug 09
That's a great blog you have there--I guess people have misconceptions about a lot of different ethnic groups, especially indigenous peoples of a country--one of the misconceptions about Native americans is that we're all supposed to have "red" skin...actually a natural brownish-tan color--yet depending just WHERE a Native is from one can be nearly black like an African American or Lily white...I know full-blooded Mohawk indians who are very "white" in color--so that's another myth that we're supposed to be all one color
1 person likes this
• United States
2 Aug 09
you know what i hate.. i'm amerindian/irish..and the first question i get from smart a**es is usually "oh,you like to drink?" and they're usually drunk themselves when they ask it!rrrrrrrrrrrrrr..
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
2 Aug 09
And what nationality are they that are asking this? Unfortunately both Natives and Irish DO have a history of drinking firewater
1 person likes this
• United States
2 Aug 09
i've had all different kinds of people say that. and you wonder how they could be so bold. true,but it's a generalization.my grandfather unfortunetly was one of them who drank.probably one reason it runs raw with me.
1 person likes this
• United States
2 Aug 09
LOL! sorry..if it makes you feel any better,now i want some too..
1 person likes this
@daeckardt (6245)
• United States
2 Aug 09
I like this. It reminds me of the diversity class I just finished. I prefer not to look at things like race and ethnicity because those are the source of so much prejudice and discrimination. I haven't been on the receiving end of those kind of questions and I don't like making those kinds of comments. I won't say that I don't have any stereotypes that I think about, but when I realize that we are all in this together, I try to find out more about what a person's background is before I make any judgment on what to think about them. When I was younger, I was uncomfortable the first time there was a black girl in my class. But now, I don't think anything about having people of different races around me. When living in Alaska, there were so many natives around that I got used to that too. Living in China for two years I got used to being around Asians. I know this isn't exactly what you were talking about, but it is what came to mind when I was reading what you wrote. Thanks for bringing up the topic.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
3 Aug 09
LOL--if you want diversity you should come to my neck of the woods..there are literally representatives of every ethnic group imaginable here...all Asian groups of people, all Hispanics, people from Russia, Poland, Hungry, the Nordic countries, UK...you name it...LOL
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
3 Aug 09
Ahh but the point of her discussion is that people should not make assumptions simply because someone is black or asian or native american. At least that's what I took it to mean. I know that *I* don't like people who make assumptions about people based on these things or ask people questions that relate to those things OF those people. To some people, ethnicity is not important and pointing it out to them (when they already know) is kind of offensive. It's like people assume you must be different somehow because of your ethnicity, and I am here to tell you that isn't true.
2 people like this
@daeckardt (6245)
• United States
3 Aug 09
Thanks for pointing that out. I agree with you that people should not make assumptions. I try not to, but sometimes you do it unconsciously anyway. I try to accept people the way they are and not let my discomfort get the better of me. I have found that people don't always fit your preconceived notion of what you have heard they should be like.
1 person likes this
@dawnald (84131)
• Shingle Springs, California
3 Aug 09
Can I be Dawn Night Owl? Well seriously, I guess I look kind of generically white and I have never ever gotten any questions like that. I did have somebody ask if my fraternal, boy/girl twins were 'real' twins....
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
3 Aug 09
You're lucky. I'd trade places with you in a heartbeat lol. Sometimes I wish I could just totally sledgehammer the next idiot who asks me a dumb question. I think maybe next time I'll just answer 'I don't know. I was hatched from an egg that was left by a spaceship on this planet'.
2 people like this
@dawnald (84131)
• Shingle Springs, California
3 Aug 09
I guess you could always take the Miss Manner's approach and get an offended look on your face and ask, "why on earth would you ask me such a thing." But if the person's such a clod as to ask in the first place, it probably won't work.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
10 Aug 09
LOL--that name would suit you Dawn Night Owl
• Philippines
11 Aug 09
I am a Proud Filipino, from the Philippines. Most of our ancient ancestors were from China,Malaysia and Vietnam. but some times we too are discriminated by our own Asian Neighbors. and some times Filipinos are discriminated through movies,comedy series, and even magazine columns that really caught some attention of the People. we work hard and strive hard for the family despite of my race being maltreated all the time. but i like what I am because we have the capacity to adopt every where.
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
12 Aug 09
What I could never understand is how come many oriental nationalities have a "thing" against each other in general, meaning antagonisms..since many originated from the same places to begin with--doesn't make sense to me
• Philippines
12 Aug 09
It's a fact that Asian Neighbors had been severedly separated since the colonization. since then, perceptions and mindset of other people had changed. when the English or other western empires like Spanish feared the Cina - Philippine alliance, they device this opium war to demoralise chinese communities slow, while Spanish makes it's way to the Phils. Asian, countries been severed because of colonization that the link between Asia in other countries are no longer connected...thus, racism among each other arises...sad..but true..
@kprofgames (3018)
• United States
4 Aug 09
OMG. Okay yeah, I was on the East Coast for a time in 87 and coming from rural middle America I was asked if we had indoor plumbing. As far as nationality, I'm 1/2 German and 1/2 Swedish - don't even want to tell you what they think about those as a combination. LOL!!!
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
10 Aug 09
How odd...why would people think that if one came from rural America that one didn't have indoor plumbing?
• United States
10 Aug 09
Idk, Pye. I think people live in a box sometimes and don't understand an area so they think it never evolved in terms of civilization. That's the only thing I can think of.
1 person likes this
@dloveli (4369)
• United States
2 Aug 09
Any assumption is ridiculous. Some more than others. Like if you're black or hispanic you're a criminal or gang banger. All latin men are great in bed. NOT! lol All african americans are great dancers. Black men have huge members. Asian men have tiny members. Jewish people are cheap. Puerto Ricans have twenty people sharing a bedroom. THey have tons of people living in small areas. There are a million of them. These are the ones me and my husband could think of at the time. Mind you my husband is puerto rican and I can assure you we are the only ones who live in my house with our two daughters and pets. I have mixed childre that happen to be good dancers but I can assure you their dad sucked. lol dl
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
3 Aug 09
LOL--I think a lot of people assume Hispanics in general to be great dancers...As for many Puerto Ricans sharing an apartment...around here it's assumed it's Mexicans..uh, actually that IS true...many Mexican families are cramped in one apartment as the rents are ridiculous around here (minimum $1,200 a month)
1 person likes this
@dloveli (4369)
• United States
3 Aug 09
I have been guilty of listening to these ridiculous assumptions myself. I think that we dont know about something its easy to believe anything. Exactly why education and open mindedness is a must in today's society. dl
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (96707)
• Marion, Kansas
2 Aug 09
I do not get a lot of those questions, but I am from many nationalities, including Native American. Many years ago I would get some Indian comments, if I braided my hair, or wore a certain dress my Aunt had made for my cousin, but she outgrew. It was not anything ethnic looking, by my estimation. In that particular era they could have just assumed I was a hippie.People never ask you if you are Irish, unless of course, you have red hair. I guess if I was blond, they might ask if I was Swedish, as that is a major ethnic group in this county. Both my original last name and my first married name were German, (unless the first married was Scottish, I have seen heraldry for both). That makes people locally ask if I am Mennonite, since that is another large population group around here. Some people just ask way too many questions.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
2 Aug 09
I guess people expect me to wear my hair braided into the two braids also that used to be traditional with many western Native groups.....I often get asked too if I can ride a horse...like ALL native americans are supposed to know how to ride one..well, I don't
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (96707)
• Marion, Kansas
2 Aug 09
I would probably assume that you can ride the subway. At least I am thinking you live in a large eastern city in the US.
1 person likes this
@MsTickle (24962)
• Australia
4 Aug 09
Not fair Pye, you have so many to choose from. I don't know on this one. I heard once that "Americans" (yep, every dang one of 'em) think that there are kangaroos jumping around all over the place here and the odd koala thrown in. Now that was hearsay and I've since found out that a lot of people DO have this picture of Aussie life...kangaroos in the city streets. If they could see our traffic they would know we are as congested with cars and smog as the next place and the roos are either in the zoo or out bush.
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
10 Aug 09
You mean you DON'T have roos jumping all over the place? Funny I'm American and it never crossed my mind that roos were all over the place
@carpenter5 (6786)
• United States
4 Aug 09
Well, I am part Cherokee Indian, and I do have a large nose, and a horrific temper. These are both things that are associated with Native Americans. I also have Irish blood, but don't have red hair and freckles. Many expect this from those with Irish descent. They wonder how I could be Irish when I have dark hair and complexion. I try to explain it's the Cherokee nationality coming out, and I don't really understand all the gene dominance Biology.
1 person likes this
@walijo2008 (4648)
• United States
3 Aug 09
Haha...This is a good discussion, I agree with you on everything you said about the Native Americans, I'm Native American also, I'm a full-blood of the Cherokee Tribe and I live in Oklahoma. I was just laughing about what all you said, some people think the whole state of Oklahoma is a reservation, I've had people ask me that. We do have a reservation here but not all of us Cherokee's live there, we're all spread out throughout the state, some are city dwellers too. People also think that we still live in Tee pees, I think thats funny too, I tell them no we live in regular houses like everybody else does. Thats funny about the lady pointing to your "Nez" I've never heard that one before, its true that Native American's do have distinctive looks, like the high cheekbones, but I never thought anything about our noses, I don't have a big nose either..ha. Now I can look at someone and tell they are a different tribe than I am, I don't know what tribe they are, but I can tell they aren't Cherokee, different tribes have different looks. As for Indian names, my maiden name is Blackbear, I had to change it when I got married, but I like that name, and if I could go back to it I would, but out of respect for my husband I took his name, the other day tho he said he was going to change his name to Blackbear, I just laughed he said he liked it, that it sounded cool. I think the funniest thing I've been asked tho out of all of them is if we still live in Teepees..lol. It doesn't offend me, I just laugh about it, some people can't help it, they've probably never been around Native American's much, hey what can you expect from a Yoneg?(Cherokee for white man)...haha.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
10 Aug 09
O-si-yo! that's hello in Cherokee isn't it? Actually I always thought the spelling was Assayo...got that from that old show Walker: Texas Ranger--amazing the stuff one can pick up from a TV show.... That's a riot! So far I've never been asked if "our" people still live in teepees. Yes I'm aware that different Native Americans can have different looks...for instance the Inuits can look more Asian so I imagine they get mistaken for people from an Oriental country
@paula27661 (15899)
• Australia
3 Aug 09
I suppose it is like getting asked whether I am a great cook because I am Italian, which I am not! I have been asked why my hair is not black and how can I possibly be so fair skinned. In guess people do make assumptions about my roots and compare me to the stereotype. I come from the North of Italy not too far from the border and in the North the population tends to be taller and fairer although not always of course; my father is over six foot tall and had blond hair and blue eyes whereas my mother did not and I’m only 5 feet 2 inches! In the South of Italy people tend to be of shorter stature with much darker features and complexions and tend to look Arabic because I believe they invaded that part of the country many moons ago hence the difference between the North and South. I don’t know about now but there used to be quite a division between the two extremities with the culture, food etc being different too. No, I don't make my own sausages or tomato sauce! (LOL)
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
10 Aug 09
As a FYI....usually people that are blondes (yes even in Italy or France, etc) somewhere back had Viking ancestry...the Vikings were a pretty busy bunch and invaded a LOT of countries during around 800-900 A.D. including my great-grandparents ancestral home of Ireland--I was told my great-grandmother had such blonde hair as a young woman it looked almost white Uh...do you make chicken Parmesan? Pizza? Ravioli? Lasagna? (just kidding) Actually I make a wicked Lasagna and Manicotti...and I'm not even Italian...
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13198)
• United States
3 Aug 09
Well... funny you ask this because I once again encountered someone who brought it up TODAY. I am your run of the mill ..... what I consider a mutt. The reason I say this? My nationality is from somewhere else but in EVERY OTHER WAY, I am basically an AMERICAN MUTT. I have always lived here. I have no odd traditions. NOTHING. I have a normal name. I speak NOTHING but english. I would think this would be OBVIOUS to everybody, even strangers, especially someone who starts talking to me! I happen to be of asian descent and I cannot BELIEVE some of the stupid assumptions people have! I also get pretty irritated that people will ask me 'is your daughter the same' or 'where's she from'. Hmmm. She's MY daughter, what the heck do you think? And do you really think that is respectful or necessary to approach a stranger with a question like that?! I think a lot of the questions and assumptions are stereotypical. People assume that I'm actually FROM somewhere else! I'm not. Neither is she! It makes sense if someone doesn't speak english at all or has a heavy accent, neither of those apply to me. Why wouldn't you assume I know nothing about another place and then NOT ask me? I don't hold 500 degrees and I don't own a grocery store and I don't live with my parents or grandparents either. I'm not good at math. I don't even like math. I'm a techie but that's not a nationality related thing. I haven't noticed people shocked that I have a normal name, but many people are downright surprised that I 1. know nothing about another culture 2. don't seem to have an interest or care. When people have the nerve to ask, shouldn't it be obvious? It seems to matter more to STRANGERS than it EVER has to me! It would never occur to me that I look 'exotic' or that if I were someone else and I saw ME walking around with my daughter that I should approach me and ask me 'where are you from?'. I can't believe anybody would assume I had lived elsewhere, I cannot think of anything I do, say, or insinuate that would make someone think that. As far as making any assumptions about you, I wouldn't. I don't ask anybody where they're from unless they speak no english, have a very heavy accent, or share all about their former country because they are proud of it. I don't think it's proper to just ask strangers things like that unless there's a reason to believe there might be a language or cultural barrier and you need to communicate with them. I've seen a photo of you before I think and I wouldn't even think to ask you about your heritage or being native american. I think it's neat because you seem to know a lot about it, but I also know you have researched some of it because... well you're interested. In every way that matters to me though, you are just like me. I wish that everybody else could see it that way too. Honestly, anybody I meet or see around me where I live or where I work or play or interact, I just figure they're all just people. Where I live everybody *unless they are illegal* are Americans, and that's it. I don't go deeper than that. I have no desire to find other illogical ways to separate people even more than we do already. Places like this some people group up according to culture because they may be learning or practicing english - like the discussions under the heading of 'philippines'. Anyway, I regret to say that all the questions and assumptions are offensive to me because people don't think before they opened their mouths. I have said before, if you wouldn't ask JUST ANYBODY the question, then it shouldn't be asked at all.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
10 Aug 09
I actually have studied into many of the cultures I belong to...for instance, I took a course in college about Native American cultures and never realized HOW many there were...yes, I was familiar with the Sioux, Apache, Cheyenne cultures, but never for instance had heard of Kwakiutl Indians. Then sometime back I studied the Celtic cultures for my own interests...uh as far as being a mutt..oh, boy am I ever...I represent Mexican, American AND Canadian Indian, German, Dutch, French, Spanish, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, and English--sheesh--but like you I don't know everything about all those cultures
@reinydawn (11649)
• United States
3 Aug 09
There are only a couple stereotypes that I normally fall into. One is that I live in a pretty red-neck town and have a lot of red-neck friends. I don't really consider myself a red-neck though, but in a sense I am. The one thing that people find shocking about me is that I have a college education and am a CPA, when I'm surrounded by mostly "laborers". Those that know me professionally, as a CPA, are usually shocked when I mention my tattoos. It's funny because when I'm with that "crowd" they think I'm like them, and when I'm with my "redneck" crowd they think I'm like them too! Lastly, I get a lot of "grief" about my age. Just today it happened again. I of course love it! I normally look a few years younger than I am, I always won the "guess my age" games at the fair - as long as my kids didn't walk up with me! I've been mistaken as my oldest son's girlfriend before, and I think the last time I was carded was about 3 years ago - I've been legal for over 20 years! Well, today, a neighbor was talking to my husband - who looks a bit older than he is because of his gray hair. Somehow I came up in the conversation and the one woman was shocked to find that both of my children are older than my hubbys, and that mine are both in their 20's. She always thought he had robbed the cradle with me! He's only a year older than I am. I know that's not really what you were looking for, but since I'm pretty much a "heinz 57" there's not much to stereotype me with.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
10 Aug 09
Count yourself lucky then that you look a lot younger than your actual age...I get that myself lots of times and it feels great!!!!
1 person likes this
@Loverbear (4928)
• United States
2 Aug 09
Hummm, I wonder what discussion you responded to??? I am Italian, and people promptly expect me to understand and speak fluent Italian. UHHH, it doesn't work that way. I had someone bring an Italian friend to me to translate for them...I listened and smiled and looked at the person and told them I don't have any idea what the f-ck they were saying! The look on the person's face was priceless,and even more so when I told them that none of my family belong to the mob either.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
3 Aug 09
Mmm..so you wonder what discussion I responded to huh? I sort have a odd situation where I live...there is a heavy Spanish-speaking population where I am, and every once in awhile someone will come up to me asking for directions...entirely in Spanish...while I'm part Spanish I don't speak it...it's like they automatically think ones speaks Spanish here
@diamania (7037)
• Netherlands
2 Aug 09
I'm just Dutch, plain Dutch. Migrants and foreigners think we are greedy. Speak crappy English ( which is actually very true as to accent but less as to writing), are all farmers ( nop, not true..., no fresh milk from the cow for you), they say we all wear wooden shoes ( nop... it's just to attract tourists... i am sorry for you guys), I also hear people talking about us having windmills on every street corner... which is untrue as well... there are only a few hundred left... if not less... furthermore, they say we never cook for more persons than necessary ( true, we don't expect visitors hopping in... in fact you might even end up with an empty plate... lollzzzz), we lack hospitality ( true..., I dont even know my neighbours) I could go on and on and even talk about what we think of migrants... which seems to be getting more negative as time passes by... but let's just keep it brief...
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
2 Aug 09
Do you grow tulips? JUST KIDDING!!!! Don't fling wet noodles at me!! ...believe it or not, among the many ethnic groups I'm from I'm part Dutch too---the Dutch side of my family came to American way back in 1659--my other ethnic groups are besides Native American and Dutch...German, French, Spanish, Mexican, Irish, English, Scottish and Welsh...uh and I'm very aware what people say/think about Mexicans.
• United States
2 Aug 09
Pye- I still remember when I was in the third grade and gave a report on my native roots, when a group of girls said "Can you braid hair"? I replied that no I could not and they said I was making up that I had Native American roots because all "Indians" could braid hair! I still remember how hurt I was over those comments. My thoughts now are that I hope this young ladies grew up and learned a bit more about the world around them. In my older ages I've not gotten too many comments about my ethnic group other then surprise. I've had people who have sworn I was Japanese! I've nothing against the Japanese, but I'm like do I really look Asian? And apparently to some I do. Now, more of the "crude" questions come when people find out I'm Pagan. When dating I'd have men ask me if they slept with me would I turn them into a zombie. I've had people ask me if I sacrifice babies. And regarding my Native roots, working in the medicine world I've actually had someone request me to do a rain dance! So, all in all I've heard some weird and crude questions, and now I just shrug it off. Namaste-Anora
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44036)
• United States
2 Aug 09
One time I was walking along the street and this "dude" is eying me..and starts yelling at me..."You're not Native American"- I just looked at him and said, yes I am...but he kept yelling at me that I wasn't--sheesh..what did he want me to do...ride in town on a horse wearing a traditional Native American dress? Don't get me about the pagan thing either...I suspect my neighbors who all know I'm Pagan/Wiccan think I'm hunch over a cauldron all the time chanting spells