We have famous olives. Is your region famous for anything?

@thea09 (18329)
Greece
August 10, 2009 1:21pm CST
Kalamata eating olives are produced in this area, along with extra virgin olve oil which is produced from local olives. Both are rightly famous as glorious in taste. The olive trees are a constant part of the landscape and once November comes the first of the olive nets are laid under the tres and the three legged ladders emerge. Do you have anything that your region is famous for, a food, something it produces or anything?
2 people like this
21 responses
• India
10 Aug 09
Hi, friend. Your region is famous for olives!! Who knows the olive oil we get here may be the one imported from your region. I am not an inhabitant of a very big city. But, it has got some quality works it is famous for. My city is famous for the international quality locks it produces and for the great Aligarh Muslim University (where i study). The locks from aligarh are exported internationally and are famous as the unbreakables. Also, the Aligarh Muslim University is a big University with a beautiful scenery and a quality education. The University is famous world wide for its culture of politeness and for the Asia`s biggest library it has. Happy Mylotting!!
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Hi friend, now that's really interesting as one never really gives thought to something like where do locks come from. We just have them fixed on things and really never give a thought to where they originate and you've suprised me. I have to admit to not having heard of your university but it sounds prestigious if it has the biggest Asian library. And what a lovely thing to be famous for as well, culture of politeness, it's not a phrase one often hears but has a delightful ring to it. You always manage to come up with something original. As for the oil, I have my own small olive grove with trees which produce olives for oil, but none of the eating variety I'm afraid.
1 person likes this
• India
11 Aug 09
Thanks for your appreciation. Maybe, our university is not one of the top ones, but its culture is really great. Whenever there is a conference or something like that in our University, the guests do not forget to mention in their speeches that they really loved the etiquette and politeness they saw here. Most people refer to this organization as a synonym of 'Tehzeeb', an urdu word for etiquette. Thanks for your comments. Happy Mylotting!!
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
11 Aug 09
Hello again, I see if we keep communicating I'm going to be picking up quite a few words in urdu. Sorry not to have heard of your university before, as you will be well aware the Western press focuses on Western things so there are many gems about your culture that you'll need to introduce us to on here.
1 person likes this
10 Aug 09
Well I have been racking my brains and for the life of me can't come up with one food which my county here in the UK is famous for. The closest would be sausages but then most counties in the UK are famous for their bangers. So taking a look at the bigger picture I am going to have to say fish & chips. You cannot beat the fish & chips you get in the UK. Moist cod covered with crispy batter, deep flavoured chips and lashings of malt vinegar and salt. Go on call me a heathen, I know you want to, lol
1 person likes this
11 Aug 09
I absolutely adore scampi except it has become seriously expensive now. As for mushy peas . I really dislike mushy peas, give me fresh normal peas any day with a bit of mint to liven them up.
@sblossom (2170)
10 Aug 09
You are really lucky. I like olive very much. I heard it’s very healthy food. I usually buy olive salad at local supermarket. I’m not sure what’s the famous in the UK. I just heard British people are very proud of their beef. It seems steak is their favourite meal plus roast beef. Happy myloting
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Hi sblossom, indeed we are lucky with our olives as the oil is extremely healthy and so pure that you could just actually drink it. I know it is expensive in other countries but here all it costs is the tax to the olive mill which presses them. Roast beef is very popular in England but I believe the number one food eaten there is actually curry.
@mimiang (3779)
• Philippines
13 Aug 09
roast beef!wow!I love that
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
13 Aug 09
With lots of English mustard
@sehlers (166)
• United States
1 Sep 09
I know this is a little late, but I'll respond as well. The state I live in is famous for being the birthplace of Spam (the meat product) and waterskiing.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
1 Sep 09
Hi sehlers, you will learn that on here it is never too late to respond. You have my deep sympathies for having any association at all with the plastic product of spam, unless I've of course just insulted you and you like the stuff, in which case congratulations, I hope you enjoy being associated with Spam. Did this great product have enough influence to change any towns name to spam, and how is spam managing these days now it has passed its name to an evil email practice. Wonder how that duplication came about?
@sehlers (166)
• United States
1 Sep 09
As far as I know, no towns have renamed themselves "Spam" here. There is a Spam Museum, however. I can only eat spam myself if it is fried. I don't know how junk email got to be called spam, but it's got to be related somehow to spam the meat product.
@sehlers (166)
• United States
1 Sep 09
LOL If you go to the Spam website, www.spam.com, under the category "fun and games", not only do they have a tab for the Spam Museum, but also a list of Spam festivals. At these festivals they have Spam carving contests and recipes contests, to which even desserts have been entered, although I can't imagine how Spam can be used in a dessert. heh
• Philippines
11 Aug 09
Well, our town is famous for... hmmm. I think corruption. LOL. anyway, to be serious, our province is famous for hot springs, and resorts.. And we have a lot of specialty foods, like buko (coconut) pie, other rice cakes ( kakanin).. I bet all the filipino members here, knows what province I'm talking about. .
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
11 Aug 09
Hi Ingkingderders, famous for corruption, well that's certainly wide spread everywhere and always has been, our country is famous for nepotism which I think falls under the same category. You have hot springs, we have cold springs, interesting. The food sounds good, I'm beginning to get a real impression of the Philipines from Mylot in general I shall wait for another Philipino to to give away the name of your province.
• Philippines
16 Aug 09
It's Laguna.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
16 Aug 09
Ok, Laguana, world atlas coming out later and a geography lesson for my son, he's always fascinated. In fact he's heard the names of mylotters from me so I could show him where some of you live and practice his capitals at the same time.
• New Zealand
10 Aug 09
Im from the Wellington region in New Zealand. We are known for producing films and Director Peter Jackson's studio is located here. Scenes from Lord of the Rings, King Kong, The lovely bones ect.. were filmed here. One of Tin Tin movies is going to be filmed here soon too. Apart from films we are known for our Kapiti cheese and ice cream which is exported to supermarkets around the world. Infact I was in a French supermarket in New Caledonia a few weeks ago and found Kapiti cheese in the supermarket there side by side with the French cheeses. Kapiti cheese comes in a range of interesting flavours one of my favourites being Chilli and Lime. Their icecream also comes in a variety of flavours. E.g Lemon cheesecake, White chocolate and raspberry, Black Licorice ect.. One last thing the region is known for is the wind we are known as ''windy Wellington".
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Hello tabatha from windy Wellington. I haven't actually seen any of those films but do know that New Zealand is famous for it's natural beauty. Now I really like the sound of this Kapiti cheese even though I'm not a huge cheese fan. I think chilli and lime in cheese sounds wonderful, but of course we don't get foreign cheese here, except cheddar and brie. Instead we have lots of varieties of feta cheese which all look exactly the same so that when you find one you actually like you are unlikely to be able to find it again as they all look the same. Your cheese sounds like it would go well with our olives.
• New Zealand
10 Aug 09
Ohh.. Im a big fan of olives and feta cheese. I'll have to visit Greece one day.:-) What part of Greece do you recomend for a holiday?
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Definitely the Peloponnese on mainland Greece is my favourite part but then again I'm biased. We have mountains, sea, beaches, charming villages, famous sights, good Greek food, and very hospitable people.
@xmapril (75)
• China
11 Aug 09
olives are somewhat expensive for our normal Chinese. but we have many cheap things, too. we have toys, crabs, vegetables, etc. some time later, i will have my own website, by that time, I will introduce and describe famous products around me in details. perhaps I will upload some photos and give some descriptions by them. are you interested? tell me and let us be friends.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
11 Aug 09
Hi xmapril, I suppose the export costs of olives must make them expensive to you in China, I have no idea of the actual cost of them here as someone always gifts some spare ones they've prepared. We often have some Chinese men wandering around the village in the evenings trying to sell cheap toys and torches. You are lucky to have crabs in your region, although we are by the sea it is a rare sight to see an actual crab. You can upload a photo by the side of your responses on Mylot but don't ask me how to do it, I'm still struggling with the whole idea.
• China
11 Aug 09
hi, i am happy with your response. your explanation is very reasonable. i really hope that you can have a look at crabs, freshwater mussels, etc in my town. can i add you as my friend? when chances permits, i want to invite you to my own website. perhaps you can find something intereting there about things around me in China!
@mimiang (3779)
• Philippines
11 Aug 09
the website that you will make will be interesting
@xfahctor (14111)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
10 Aug 09
I live in New Hampshire, a state in the north east corner of the United States, among the 6 states known here as "new england". New hampshire is noted for it's maple syrup, maple trees are every where, can't turn and spit with out hitting one. We are also noted for timber production, we have a constantly regenerating forest region and produce soem great pine lumber. We are also known for our ski resorts and mountain ranges, tourism is probably the primary industry in the norhtern half mof my state. Hiking, camping, hunting, fishing and other summer and fall activites are something people travel great distances to do here. We are known for our moose population, they are every where. We are also very well known for our fall foliage, colors up here are unmatched nearly anywhere in the world due to the unique climate, mix of tree species and vast expanses of forests.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Hi xfahctor, I love your reply, it brings up all sorts of differnt images. Walking amidst the falling leaves then bumping into a moose. I'm actually trying to picture a moose now with little success, are they dangerous to run into or any special tips they give the hikers on how to deal with them. Now I did think that maple syrup was a Canadian thing and never actually connected it with America, they certainly have the bigger reputation for it. You do make a wonderful picture of the area though, I'm ready to book my ticket for the 'fall'.
@xfahctor (14111)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
10 Aug 09
moose in the road - a couple moose and a couple cars that managed to avoid them
durring certain times of the year, moose can sometimes be considered the most dangerous animal in the country, they can be very agressive durring rutting and when protecting young, especialy the larger males which can weigh up and over 1500 lbs. More often than not, they are fairly shy and will wander off when they catch sight or smell of humans, other times, they just seem Also, they are a very big hazzard on our roads, hitting one of these things on the highway has totaled quite a few cars and killed quite a few people. They are pretty tastey though, lol.
@xfahctor (14111)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
10 Aug 09
result of moose-car collision - What can happen when you DON'T watch for moose on the roads up here
and here is what they can do to a car.....
@thokius (426)
• Austria
11 Aug 09
Hello thea09, My country Bulgaria is famous with yoghurt. Especially the bacteria in it. You can search the net for more details. Cheers! Thok
@mimiang (3779)
• Philippines
11 Aug 09
That is delicious.Very interesting!
@thokius (426)
• Austria
12 Aug 09
Yes. We are quite the drinkers. You can find pubs/ bars on almost every corner... Cheers!
@coolcat123 (4390)
• India
11 Aug 09
My area is famous for silk.Its also called the silk city.Silk is exported to many countries. Its ancient work of taking it out from silk worms.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
11 Aug 09
Hi coolcat, silk is certainly a nice thing to be associated with. When you mentioned the export side it made me remember back to the silk road when silk was traded for spices by travellers, it sounded so much more exotic then. Do they still use the traditional an ancient methods of extractin the silk or has it all been modernised these days?
• India
20 Aug 09
not yet the modern method are used the the main reason behind that is the outward part of the country even its a backward area of a state. and this is ending as no body is taking care of it.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
20 Aug 09
So you mean that the whole industry of silk production is dying out?
@RieRie (822)
10 Aug 09
Cadburys Chocolate :-) Maybe other things too, but the only thing I can think of is Chocolate, oh and Shakespeare.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Hi RieRie, your profile says London but let me guess that you've moved down from either Birmingham or Stratford. If that's the case there's also the spaghetti junction, the Brummie accent, the Dirty Duck, and the Bull Ring. Am I right?
@RieRie (822)
11 Aug 09
That's right. Oh yeah, I've moved back too, I best change that. Well I'm actually from Warwickshire, that's why I mentioned Shakespeare, but Birmingham is kind of the same region.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
11 Aug 09
Warwick castle, Charlcote manor house. I love that areaUsed to love going to Stratford, one of my favourite places.
@mimiang (3779)
• Philippines
11 Aug 09
Philippines is known for abaca for making ropes, for vinegar from palms, for gold for our jewelry and our cuisine and hospitality
@mimiang (3779)
• Philippines
13 Aug 09
yes.It is a product of Bulacan, Philippines
• United States
27 Aug 09
Lol, well I live in San Antonio, Tx so we have The Alamo. Does that make my region famous? XD
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
27 Aug 09
Hi DrHarleenQuinzel, that's a long name you've chosen. Most certainly your area is famous for the alamo and oil, not to mention its dry heat.
@malpoa (1218)
• India
12 Aug 09
Yup, this place is famous for all the sweet items mostly made of milk. there are thousands of diffrent varieties of sweets made from milk, can u imagine that? n every block u walk up or down u will find a sweet shop. people here have sweets 2-3 times a day. even some of them are good fore the health tht the doctor gives a full nod to have it. people here have made this sweets part of culture. the one system u will find amusing ids that, if someone in the family passes away, people dnt go visitng them empty handd. thy takes sweets along with htem!!!
• United States
11 Aug 09
I'm from Florida. Obviously we are known for oranges since most of the oranges come from here. which are made for orange juice too. Tropicana is here in Florida. And also, I'm actually in Miami, Florida so spanish food is a very big thing around here, specifically cuban. But since there are many different latin backgrounds here, you can find just about any type of spanish restaurant you can imagine. The Florida keys are close by. they are known for their key lime pie and conch fritters which is a type of fried seafood.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
11 Aug 09
Hi Jennuine, I've always been attracted by the idea of the Forida keys made famous to me by Wallace Stevens in 'the idea of order at key west', I just love that poem. I also love Spanish food so you are very lucky to have much variety of that there. It seems that many places are famous for their oranges, another Spanish link there I see.
• United States
11 Aug 09
The area of Indiana where I grew up is known for growing corn, mostly for animal feed, but some popcorn as well and college basketball players. Currently I live in California where they do a lot of business in citrus, avocados, tomatoes and strawberries.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
11 Aug 09
Hi Fennelfoot, like your name by the way, no foot odour there I take it.. It must be fun to come from a place famous for popcorn. The Greeks are quite hot on basketball too, I know someone from here who teaches basketball in the states, he's the tallest person I've ever met. California keeps cropping up on here for the fruit but you are the first to mention avocadoes, lovely.
• United States
10 Aug 09
Walla Walla, Washington (where I reside) is the only place in the country where you can get Walla Walla Sweet Onions. Every year we have a festival commemorating the onion and you can learn and try many different recipes. Most residents around here can peel an onion and eat it as if it was fruit, I know I can. If you haven't tried one I suggest that you go to your local market and try one.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
11 Aug 09
I Patsy, what a fantastic name for a place, Walla Walla. It definitely sounds more Australian than Amercian some how though. We have a village a couple of hours north from here whose name actually translates to 'onion'. I probably use more onions than any other vegetable and like them raw so yours sound tempting. I won't be able to try one though as we don't have imported onions here, just mainly red ones grown here.
• United States
10 Aug 09
I live in California and I guess California is famous for the oranges and other fruits that grow here.I've been a bit further down south and saw some farms growing strawberries and they were pretty good too. So yea, lots of fruits growing in California
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Hi animegirl, that makes three of us on here with oranges in common, California, Spain and Greece. We will never have had the need to sample each others orange varieties each having our own on the doorstep. I didn't realise that California was famous for it's strawberries though, we have those too but they are very seasonal.
@GardenGerty (88991)
• Marion, Kansas
10 Aug 09
Kansas is known for hard red winter wheat. That is why we are the breadbasket of the US. It is not nearly so flavorful as olives, but a good bread is wonderful dipped in olive oil. I love olives.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Hi GardenGerty, how well you matched out two things, I love fresh bread dipped in olive oil and that is how it is eaten out here. If you asked for butter with the bread you'd just recieve a look of disdain. If it's real bread you get, as opposed to all the processed stuff, it's really good part toasted roughly with olive oil drizzled on it with a garlic clove run over the bread before it's toasted.
@Sandra1952 (6052)
• Spain
10 Aug 09
Hello, Thea. We live just inside the Valancia/ Murcia border in Spain, so the oranges we grow are official Valencian oranges. They are thin skinned,sweet, and very juicy. When we walk down to the village in April and May, the air is heavy with the scent of orange blossom. From December onwards, the oranges are ready for harvest, so it's a hive of activity. Unfortunately, the price was so low this year that many of the smaller growers didn't bother to harvest them, so they fell off the trees and rotted, which seemed a terrible waste. Oranges are very cheap all year round here, ranging from 2 - 3 euros for 5 kilos, so we have freshly squeezed juice every morning. I'm missing it while we're visiting friends and family in the UK.
@thea09 (18329)
• Greece
10 Aug 09
Hello Sandra, we share the oranges in common, the trees are everywhere. We can buy big sacks of them at the side of the road for 5 euros. One of the nicest sights I ever saw was the only time when we had snow here, the orange trees had oranges and snow on them. Like with you lots of them just fall off and rot. Here thought they seem to be all year round as I've been getting them this month straight of the trees in one of my friendly fishermans garden, but the biggest glut of them does seem to be in the winter. There's certainly no nicer way to eat an orange though than fresh from the tree.