At what age do you think people should retire?

@owlwings (39059)
Cambridge, England
November 13, 2006 10:12am CST
Do you think people should be able to choose when they retire? Do you think that people should have to retire at a certain age? Do you think that people's rights in the workplace or their salary should change when they start to draw a pension?
3 people like this
34 responses
@nannacroc (4049)
14 Nov 06
I think people should retire when they are ready. I know some forty year old people who seem ready for retirement because they act very old. I also know some seventy year old people who are still fit and eager to work. By forcing people to retire we are losing the experienced people and the ones who could teach others. Many workplaces now are saying they can't get skilled people. Why not let older workers stay on and train the next generation?
2 people like this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
14 Nov 06
My sentiments entirely!
• United States
13 Nov 06
NO person should be forced to retire. The salary should remain the same. I doubt I will ever fully retire, unless my health becomes an issue.
2 people like this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
13 Nov 06
Perhaps it's a time when one can choose what one does - a new 'career', even. If one has worked well all one's life, one has earned the opportunity to broaden one's horizons - maybe to start making money online, who knows!
1 person likes this
@pagli84 (1850)
• Netherlands
13 Nov 06
whenever they think they are ready to retire...when they think they cant or shouldnt work anymore.
2 people like this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
13 Nov 06
Sometimes people are scared to retire - financially and socially it looks like a big black hole!
1 person likes this
@Kelian (768)
• Trinidad And Tobago
13 Nov 06
People should be able to choose when they retire, but when their ability to work declines and they show no signs of going they should be nudged. People need to embrace the freedom of retirement and take the time to do the things they've been missing out on. Retirement doesn't mean life has to stop, but a lot of people are afraid to retire.
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
13 Nov 06
I agree that the idea of retirement can be like a big yawning chasm for some people! I don't think that enough training and preparation is available!
1 person likes this
@luzamper (1360)
• Philippines
2 Jan 07
In the Philippines, the compulsory retirement age is 65, but for judges, it's 70. There is optional retirement at younger age, provided a certain number of years is met. In other countries, the age is lower. I believe that people should retire at the age of 60 so that they may still enjoy a little during their elderly life. Pension here is just a certain percentage of the average salary for a number of years service.
@vinaykant (814)
• India
2 Dec 06
i think the age of 55-60 is the right age fo people should retire.
2 people like this
• United States
23 Nov 06
I don't know much about retirement. I do feel people who work for plenty of years. Should have a say in their future. retirement is not for all people at the governments age set. Too much control is taken from everyone these days.
2 people like this
@gsnarayanan (1705)
• India
15 Nov 06
Retirement age depends upon the country's requirement for man power. If the man power is in excess the retirement age will be less....!
@asteroid8 (916)
• Italy
15 Nov 06
I think that it's not right to set a retirement age for all the people. There are jobs more difficult than others, or requiring more strenght. A person should be able to choose the age when going on retirement.
2 people like this
• United States
15 Nov 06
I think a person should be allowed to work until they want to quit or until their health/abilities no longer allow them to do their job. Then they should be offered another job within their company that they can do (if one exists) or offered retirement. But it is all depends on the job. A very physical job will be harder for a 75 year old to do then sitting behind a desk. My dad just turned 60 and is a train engineer. He is climbing up and down on the engines all day and a lot of other strenuous physical stuff. He was considering retiring this year after he turned 60 but then he had a heart attack. He has been off work since June but now he can't decide if he should retire because his pension won't be enough to pay his bills. Other employees are really pushing him to retire because he is the #3 person there in seniority and in the area that he works he is #1 so he is top dog and has his choice of jobs. They don't like that. I think the reason many people are afraid of retirement is because they don't know anything else. They have worked for so long they don't know what they would do with themselves if they are not working. For many--their jobs are their identity. My dad's biggest concern (now that he has had the heart attack) is that at 60 he is not covered by medicare so he will have no health insurance once he retires. He obviously needs it with his medical problems. So he will probably have to go back to work until he turns 65 and collect that. 60 is not old. Neither is 65. My dad is still young with many years ahead of him. He doesn't act like an old person, neither does my mother in law who is 64.
2 people like this
@pumpkinjam (5767)
• United Kingdom
13 Nov 06
There should probably be a few provisos, like having a medical when you reach a certain age or something to ensure you are still capable of doing your job but I think that should happen for everyone even before retirement age. I think as long as there are no reasons for someone not to continue in their job then they sholdn't be forced to retire. Still, there are going to be dilemmas such as, some old people who continue working would be the first to complain about someone else not working when that someone else could be the next one to take the old persons job, if you see what I mean.
1 person likes this
• United Kingdom
13 Nov 06
Actually, reading a few other answers, I do think it is a good idea for older people to "slow down" ie. not retire immediately but comtinue a job part time and maybe get someone new to jobshare until the older person retires. I know a lot of old people do worry about money when they retire but they aren't the only people with money problems and I think some, not all, don't appreciate that they are still going to be better off when they retire than the person taking over their job would be had they not got a job.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
14 Nov 06
The encouragement to 'slow down' should not be misconstrued as a method of gently levering someone out of the job. I think that training should be offered to potential retirees (I believe that some larger companies do this) and that person's skills (in which most companies will have invested quite a lot) should be recognised and retained on a consultancy basis, if that person wishes.
1 person likes this
• United Kingdom
14 Nov 06
Yes, I agree. I didn't mean slow down as in forced to slow down in order to retire. I meant given the choice if they have either already decided or if they are not longer able to do the job full time but have skills which could be used or passed on.
1 person likes this
@macubx (11433)
• Philippines
13 Nov 06
at the age of 60.. to give other people a chance to work..
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
13 Nov 06
So you think that, regardless of the amount of experience and maturity they have, not to mention the ability to train people, they should be on the scrap-heap? Did it ever occur to you that 60 is not old, these days?
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Nov 06
60 is so young, though. My father just turned 60 this past September and although he is contemplating retiring early he still has many good working years in him and he does a very physical job. He's a train engineer.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
15 Nov 06
I agree. Apparently the current generation can expect to live to an average age of 100! 60 (or 65) is nothing these days!
@crofter9 (150)
18 Nov 06
Can I retire now please ... I'm 40. I think people should be left to make a choice for themselves. I know I'm never going to be fit enough to hold down a physical full time job anymore, and I've been forced to find employment that I can do from home or go onto the longterm "sick" list. I'd love to be able to retire instead and live the remainder of my time without the pressure of work. I realise for others it is the opposite, to retire is to take away the life in them. Good luck to you.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
18 Nov 06
I would gladly say that you could retire while I, who find that I relied somewhat on work to keep me feeling young, continued to work. Your point is a very good one. Some people need to - indeed, have to - go a little easier earlier than others. They should be able to claim their pension when it is right for them to do so (and not be penalised because they are unable to do less than others in terms of paying into the common fund).
@crofter9 (150)
18 Nov 06
Thank you Keep up the good work with some very interesting discussions. It was so refreshing looking at your profile to find real topics not just coke or pesi.... Thanks again
1 person likes this
@lenith (1222)
• India
18 Nov 06
HAPPILY SINGLE  - HAPPILY SINGLE
i think everyones has different capacity of working so its only they are who have to right to choose their retire age
1 person likes this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
19 Nov 06
I agree with the last three. Retirement should be a personal thing and not dictated by blanket laws. Perhaps there should be encouragement to retire but no pressure.
• United States
18 Nov 06
I dont think that it should be based on age. I think it should have to do with the fact if you are financially secure enough to retire.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
18 Nov 06
Some people, however, may have worked hard all their lives, yet still not be financially secure enough. When I started work in 1959, the amount that I and my employers paid in National Insurance contributions was supposed to have given everyone in the country a dignified retirement fund, provided they had made at least the minimum contributions. 45 years down the line we have seen mismanagement and misappropriation of those funds (all quite 'legally') so that my pension is barely above what is classed as the poverty line. Fortunately my wife still works and we own the house we live in, due to buying and selling houses at appropriate times. I know that many people have paid into pension funds so that they now have annuities to supplement the State pension. I was never in a job that paid me enough to allow me to save much in that way - and hadn't the Government promised that what I have paid over the years would translate to a sensible amount? I fully admit that I am not sitting waiting for the soup-kitchen to open quite yet and I do enjoy an excellent health service and free bus passes and a number of other benefits, but I do feel sold short by successive governments over the years.
@ladydi151 (202)
• United States
16 Nov 06
They should have left the age at 50 and given an option when. There's this lady at BellSouth age 70 who wouldn't retire. She really didn't need to work because she had money. She was blocking a young persons chance to get in the door. They downsized and got rid of her then.
1 person likes this
• United States
16 Nov 06
Unless she wasn't performing her duties correctly anymore that seems very wrong. So the rights of the young outweigh the rights of the old, huh? Isn't that age discrimination and illegal in the US. Oh, but she wasn't fired for being old, they just found a way around the laws to get rid of her. One day we will all be old and you won't think it so funny when someone throws you out the door just because you are 70 years old. We should all be looking to our elders--they have all the wisdom.
2 people like this
@AJ1952Chats (2340)
• Anderson, Indiana
15 Nov 06
As long as I have the ability to write, there will be no retirement for me. Some people are anxious to retire or else no longer able to work at what they're doing. In cases like this, it's time to retire--or, at least, change to a more suitable job/career. Look at Jack LaLayne. At the most he has, perhaps, slowed down a little, but he's definitely not retired. Ditto to Paul Harvey! Walter Cronkite and Mike Wallace still have their presence around at least occasionally. How about Bob Barker? Ruth Warrick was Phoebe Tyler Wallingford on All My Children right up until she got too sick to continue and passed away. Grandma Moses didn't even gain fame as an artist until she was around 80. Oh yes! How could we ever forget Clara "Where's The Beef?" Peller. I've seen elderly men and women take post-retirement jobs in places such as restaurants and Wal-Mart. If both MyLot and I are still around on December 12, 2052, expect to see me here!
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
19 Nov 06
Thanks for reminding us of all those people who laughed in the face of the idea of retirement! Good luck to you and your writing! That is one profession where there is absolutely no pressure to retire!
@rosebug23 (1909)
• Australia
15 Nov 06
I don't think there should be any reason for a person to retire as long as they are still capable off do the job or maybe teaching others to do the job .I don't agree that while they are working they should get a pension,why should the government pay a pension to a working person . Here i Australia we have a retirement age but you don't have to retire,if you keep working you don't collect your pension but the government gives you a larger tax break and when you do retire you get a lump sum payment from the gov. the amount depends on how long you have worked after retirement age. WE have superannuation here your company pays into it each week a percentage of your wage (their money) and you can contribute as well when you retire you can have a lump sum payment or a pension,but you are not entitled to gov pension unless your super payment is too low then the gov top' it up for you. I hope you understand what i am trying to explain
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
15 Nov 06
Since October this year, the UK now has a similar system. I missed coming under it by a few months. I had told my bosses verbally more than once that I did not want to retire at 65, yet a week before my birthday, I had an EMAIL congratulating me on reaching retirement age! In other words, not even the month's notice required by my contract! I checked the legal situation (but not before writing a very strong letter back) and found that they were within their rights (just) in doing what they did.
@pacheco (62)
• Portugal
13 Nov 06
65 years
1 person likes this
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
13 Nov 06
Just like that? However ready or not a person is to stop working and regardless of the value that his maturity and experience is to the field of his work?
1 person likes this
@caribe (2465)
• United States
2 Jan 07
I think it is and should be an individual thing. It should be left up to the individual. I don't think their salaries should change just because they are drawing a pension. I think that many people fear retiring. It is like stepping off into the darkness to them. I have an ex brother-in-law that is still working although he is way past the age he could be retired. For him, he feels an obligation to continue to care for a handicapped son and a daughter's children. I think for some people that their identity has become so mixed in with their work as to who they are, that they feel like they would lose themselves if they retired. I think that everyone should do what makes them happy and healthy. If their health is bad, they definitely should think of retiring and try to enjoy the time they have left--get new interests and hobbies and try something new.
1 person likes this