Lockerbie bomber released on compassionate grounds

United States
August 21, 2009 1:03pm CST
If you aren't aware yet who the Lockerbie bomber was, his name was Abdelbeset Ali Mohmed Al Megrahi, he blew up a Pan Am flight over Scotland and was convicted of murdering a little over 200 people. Apparently, he has three months to live due to progressive prostate cancer. A scottish judge recently released him on compassionate pardons to go back to his home in Lybia. (Google it if you want more information, mylot won't let me paste links just yet.) Anyway, I'd like to know.... How do you guys feel about this? I want to hear from people all over the Earth, not just America (as nearly all the casualties on the flight were American, and most middle-aged Americans seem to be very disproving of this action) Do you think this fair? That this man, convicted of a couple hundred murders is being released to die? Is it a fair pardon from the judge? or should he have suffered in prison 'till death? Why do you think?
2 responses
@marguicha (97571)
• Chile
21 Aug 09
We all have to die. Noone can change that. But what we can do is how we chose to live. That man killed a lot of people (I don´t even care for the number, one is enough). He should pay. Why should a person who did not think of the families he was destroying be pardoned to be with his own family? I´m so afraid that this type of "compasion" helps violence instead of stopping it. WE innocent people are being harrased in airports all over the world (specially in the US) after the twin towers terrorist act. Some muslim people had real trouble flying just because their clothes spoke of their faith. And yet, this man will be given a present for his extremelly good behaviour in lifeOMG!!! I´d better stop. Could be writing about this all day. Take care
• United States
21 Aug 09
I like your enthusiasm.... And i partially agree. Also, I think it was rather strange that they let him fly, on a plane, back to Libya. But do you think he would really still be a threat?
@marguicha (97571)
• Chile
21 Aug 09
It´s not a matter of his being a threat. I don´t think so. But who is to say which of the many prisoners in jails are not threats any more so they´ll be taken out of prison without finishing their sentences? Don´t you think that there are lots of people that coulds say the same? "I´m old, I won´t do any harm anymore, let me be". Why did the world judge Eichmann when he was a very old man? Should the world have said: he´s old, he won´t commit genocides anymore? Justivce is not only to punish the people who do wrong but to act as a reminder for other people not to go astray.
@jonakyl (493)
• United States
21 Aug 09
Is he still a threat? Hmmm you tell me. Who is the best person to inspire young ones on terrorism, murder, and violence in general than someone so well known as the person who blew up that Pan Am flight? From what I've heard he got a hero's welcome in Libya. You don't think he will have followers now that will listen to his every word? I'd say he's very much a threat still. Not by his own deeds obviously, but by the leadership and inspiration he'll provide others that consider him a hero.
1 person likes this
@dodo19 (33043)
• Beaconsfield, Quebec
22 Aug 09
To me, it just feels wrong that this man was released. This man hurt so many people and I'm not just talking about his victims. I'm also talking about the families of his many victims. It just doesn't seem fair to all of these people, whom he has hurt. It doesn't feel right. I don't think that justice was really served.