Puppies and older dogs

@sharra1 (6344)
Australia
August 29, 2009 12:48am CST
We have a lovely 5 year old male dog who is fairly placid. Our other dog died 2 years ago and we had been thinking of getting a puppy for over a year. Well we found a puppy at last. She is a lovely feisty kelpie cross and has enormous energy. She is cheeky and answers back all the time. She is much smaller than he is, in fact she is not much bigger than his head at the moment and she never seems to take no for an answer. This problem I am having is that every time we tell her off our older dog reacts as though we have told him off and we have to reassure him that he is a good boy. It is making it really hard to discipline the pup in his presence and we need to do this as she is very pushy when we pat him. Even when we use her name before the command he still seems to think it is about him. I do not know how to deal with this. She has only been with us for 2 weeks so maybe it will work itself out. Has anyone here had this problem? Has anyone introduced a puppy to an adult dog and if so how has it worked out. She is only 12 weeks only and still very frisky.
2 people like this
8 responses
• India
9 Sep 09
Hello my friend sharra1 Ji, Seeing you after very long time. But I am sorry to dis-appoint you as I am totally blank on the subject, and have almost NIL experience, where I could guide you. Many Years back, after we lost 'Jackie' in our house, nothing was replaced. We even remember that dog. May God bless You and have a great time.
1 person likes this
@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
10 Sep 09
Well the problem seems to have resolved itself and they are now playing together which is great. They seem to have settled down together quite well.
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• India
11 Sep 09
Hello my friend sharra1 Ji, So be happy. Problem is self resolved. "Acceptance' with new atmosphere takes little time by nature and it gets settled as time passes, having no option. May God bless You and have great time.
@mjhicks (319)
• United States
31 Aug 09
Puppies are like children, they will learn by example as well as direct teaching. Reward the older dog n the pup's presence for good, proper, or on command behavior. Praise, attention or a small treat whatever you reward system is. Tell the pup wait and have someone even hold him if necessary while telling the pup wait not your turn yet. Then switch and give the pup a simple command while tellin your older dog wait your turn. . You's be suprised how fast the little one will pick up on how to behave as well as the older dog getting to show off what he already knows. You may have to give the pup a "time out" if he gets just too rambunchous with the older dog so he can have a break from the annoying antics. We adopted a Pom-Snow dog mix when our golden retriver was about 3 yrs old. She still had a bit pup of in her and played with the little dog just fine but when she got tired we had to restrain the pup so she could get some rest. The goldie would get up on the sofa or bed to get away from her but if she let her tail hang over the pup would soon tug on it till she pulled her of on the floor lol. Cookie, the goldie could easily dominate the pup but soon figured out if she won the "fight" each time by just pinning her down that the fun was over too soon. I would also tell her "that's not fair give Ginger, the pom, a chance". She learned to pretend the pom had her pinned to the floor. Now there 6 and 9 yrs old and seldom play their games. And still just like kids have to be reminded sometimes who's turn it is for a walk, food etc.
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@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
31 Aug 09
That makes sense and we are doing our best to do this. Today they actually played together for the first time and that was really good to see. From what we can see the older dog needed our reassurance that he was doing the right thing when disciplining her. Now that he can see that she is not going to displace him and that we will not interfere when he tells her off for being too frisky, he is starting to relax around her more. We have a place where he can go to get away from her and he will use it when he needs to get away. He does not get enough exercise from his walks alone and we hope they will play together.
@taztheone (1726)
• India
30 Aug 09
Dogs is an animal which I love the most, now not to mention that people always love puppies & babies. Unfortunately I don't have a dog at home currently, hopefully I'll get one soon! Happy Lotting
@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
10 Sep 09
Dogs are my favourite animal as well.
@Archie0 (4676)
29 Aug 09
Introducing a dog to a puppy can be a bit difficult in the start, because i have always seen that pups are most of the time a bit scared of the adult dogs and they will never see them, but the dogs will always dominate the puppies and will growl over them, but i have seen one thing that the adult dogs always care for the pups a lot may be they take some time but they do care for them from the start of the day.
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@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
30 Aug 09
The older dog does seem to care for the puppy as he only ever growls and never threatens. It is always a warning to the pup to settle down. I do not think he would ever harm her but sometimes she pushes far too much. Still we have made a place where he can go and get away from her when he wants some peace.
@ZephyrSun (7399)
• United States
29 Aug 09
I experienced this with my puppy last year and he was so pushy it drove my other dog crazy. My older dog took the pushy puppy for a while and then they began to fight so I ended up having to get rid of the puppy. My brother took the puppy about 6 months after we got the puppy and even now when the "puppy" and my dog get together they get to fighting over the pushiness of the "puppy". I hope it works out well for you. We had to males so maybe yours will be better.
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@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
29 Aug 09
Hmmm that does sound like a problem. I hope she grows out of it and we do have a place the older dog can go to get away and have some peace. I know that two of the same gender is trouble as I have had two females before and they fought all the time. We were told that if they were different genders they would be ok. I just hope that this trouble is just a young puppy being active and that she grows out of it. If she doesn't then we will have problems and will have to decide what to do about it.
@JenInTN (27568)
• United States
29 Aug 09
Sounds like you have quite the hand full sharra! It's great you found one you at last. I think it just takes a little time. Your adult dog will learn her name. Just be sure not to look at him when you call it. He'll get the picture. Go to another room with your adult dog and have your hubby hold the puppy..because she may want to follow. Call for the puppy..then have your hubby let it go..not looking at your male during this time. After a bit..he will learn her name. Good luck.
1 person likes this
@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
29 Aug 09
Yes she is definitely a handful and I hope she quietens down as she gets older. We are being careful about teaching her and him about her name and letting him know that he is a good boy. He is being remarkably tolerant and I hope they learn to get on together in time.
@James72 (26833)
• Australia
29 Aug 09
Heya Sharra! I'm cdertainly no expert on dogs, but we intorduiced a new dog to our house many years ago when I lived back in Australia and although the new dog wasn't a puppy, we still had similar issues. All we could do was be patient until such time as the pack mentality/pecking order dynamic fell into place. It can't be easy for an existing dog to suddenly have their master add a new member to the pack! At first I thought it might be wise to try and discipline the new puppy away from your current dog, but I think this would only drag the problem out for a longer period of time. All the different behaviours by you and Lash that are witnessed by both dogs are vital in teaching each of them their place, it just takes time. The frisky puppy behaviour and your current dog's reaction to it must be funny as heck too!
1 person likes this
@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
29 Aug 09
Hi James, I think you are right but it is so frustrating having to live through it. I am beginning to suspect that the puppy is hero worshipping the dog but he gets so frustrated at her constant jumping up to his nose. Of course part of that is size as she does not come up to the top of his leg yet so she has to jump to look him in the eye. He just keeps turning his head away and when she gets too annoying he growls and she backs off for all of 3 seconds. Still we are trying to learn from him how to put her in her place. It seems that turning away and ignoring her works best so we are working on that. Plus I make sure she knows her place in the hierarchy by feeding her last etc. So maybe it just takes time. I have removed almost everything she could damage until she stops chewing everything in sight. I am getting too old to be running after a puppy all the time.
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@k_petev (37)
• Bulgaria
29 Aug 09
I have German shepherd and it is 7 years old and i do not think to have another dog untill i have this.
@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
1 Sep 09
German shepherds are very nice dogs