Will you trust an ex-convict to work for you?

Philippines
August 29, 2009 9:52pm CST
Supposing you have a carpentry business near your home with your family. Then, a very highly skilled carpenter applied for a job and his credentials are among the best which means he can be a good asset for your business. However, you learned that he is an ex-convict who has 5 counts of murder and was only given a parole due to his good deeds in prison after serving 15 years. Assuming that he is much bigger, younger and stronger than you, will you trust him to work for you? If yes, on what conditions and agreements will you give him? Thanks!
4 people like this
11 responses
@tammytwo (4305)
• United States
31 Aug 09
It would depend on all of the circumstances. But five counts of murder means it wasn't a crime of passion, where he may have caught a wife cheating or something and just snapped and killed the person. Five murders is a lot to explain. Just because he is on parole doesn't mean he has learned his lesson. Many people are paroled just to end up doing the same thing they were previously convicted for. I just don't really know if I could trust him to work for me or not, especially if the business were close to my home and he could find out where my family was.
@tammytwo (4305)
• United States
31 Aug 09
If I did agree to let him work for me I would allow no contact with my family. And if any signs of aggression began to surface I would have to fire him immediately.
@williamjisir (22905)
• China
31 Aug 09
Hello friend. I think that I will give him the job based on his attitude and sincerity. Anyone makes mistakes in life, but so long as he realizes it and is happy to change himself to a better man, why not give him a chance if we could? If all of us discriminate him, we are not helping him, but pushing him back to his behaviour once again. So I will surely give him another chance for doing the work since he is a very highly skilled carpenter as well.
@kun2349 (23475)
• Singapore
31 Aug 09
I will be a little scared initially, but i will still give him a chance.. Because since he has already served his time, and that he's released deu to good deeds, it proves that he's changed for the better.. I wont trust him that much for the initial stages but let time prove that he's a totally different person.. If anything goes wrong, dun pinpoint to him as culprit, rather let him explain, and clear himself.. With better communication and trust, things will always turn out good ^_^ hehe
@lynnemg (4539)
• United States
31 Aug 09
First of all, the question arises, is this company insured? If it is, the felony convictions may immediately disqualify him from the job. Many insurers will not insure a convicted felon. Other than that, there are many personal questions that need answered. Do you, as an employer feel comfortable with the thought of a convictede murdered working for you. If not, trust your first instincts and do not hire him. Next, has the man been upfront and honest or have you had to search for the informaation? If you had to search for the information, I'd be wondering why the guy felt the need to hide it in the first place. If it were me, and insurance pretty well left it in my hands, I would really pay attention to my own instincts. If my gut told me to bewarem I would not hire the guy. In general, whether in business or any aspect of life, our gut insticts guide us in the right direction.
• Philippines
31 Aug 09
Every person has his good and bad sides. There is always a second chance. In our agency, we rehabilitate prisoners and we are seeing good results, although not all of them do, I admit. We are, in fact, recommending parolees and probationers to various institutions for work and we are getting success stories therefrom. Having known himself to be on parole, of course, you have your apprehensions but this doesn't mean you cannot try hiring him. On your side, having known this fact, I know you would be extra sensitive with all things around him while you employ him. Maybe, you can talk to his parole officer beforehand and maintain regular contact with him as you hire him.
@Mge3dme (29)
• United States
30 Aug 09
I believe in forgiving people and giving them second chances. However, a convicted murderer can not be trusted. Especially a convict who has five counts of it. Also, more than likely the 15 years in prison that he did actually made his carpentry skills diminish to say the least. His credentials also can not be that good if they are 15+ years old. Also, considering the poor state of the economy, you or anybody else for that matter could find a skilled carpenter no problem who would literally beg for a job from you.
@mrbranan (1012)
• United States
30 Aug 09
The answer is no. There is no way I would want a murderer in the same place as my children or the rest of my family for that matter. I am responsible for the welfare of my family and would choose not to put them in harms way.
@dodo19 (31917)
• Beaconsfield, Quebec
30 Aug 09
This is a difficult question, but I think that part of me might be tempted to give this person a chance. It wouldn't be easy, but there is still a part of me that might be able to believe that this person might have changed a bit. I know that not criminal changes, but I do believe that some do.
@vandana7 (62278)
• India
30 Aug 09
I would. U said he served 15 years. So he is most certainly not willing to waste another 15 years in there by killing me. But having said that, I would like to know what drove him to those murders, whether they were personal vendetta's, or any act of the murdered individuals. If it was some behavior of the murdered individuals, then if I have those characteristics, then I would avoid the ex-convict. If not, then I would have no issues what so ever.
@Lakota12 (42684)
• United States
30 Aug 09
That would be very hard to hire this person . But then they can prove themselves by doing a good job and live across town!
@jillmalitz (5132)
• United States
30 Aug 09
I might. If he had served his time in prison well I would be willing to give him a second chance. True he committed murder. What were the circumstances? Was he always a criminal or was this an unfortunate turn of events in his life? I would have to talk seriously to him about his past and what he wants for his future. Of course I would have to give his a probationary period as do most companies. But I will say that in the construction business there are frequently people who have hot tempers. It is the nature of the business. So I would have to be on guard. But I would at let him try.