Why are Filipino FM stations speak English?

Philippines
September 3, 2009 10:31am CST
We are in the Philippines, how come FM radio stations don't speak their native language? Who are their real audience?
1 person likes this
5 responses
@ruperto (1552)
• Philippines
5 Sep 09
I had the same observation ... until It became known that many Filipinos are not comfortable with Pilipino / Tagalog... While a security guard at a mall tried to advise people not to cross the street yet, a few people crossed any way. My conclusion is that most of them speak a different dialect... There is a saying: "We are a country united by a foreign language :) " Agree?
• Philippines
6 Sep 09
Agree. It seems English language has been perceived as the language of the rich and educated. If you compare two tv commercials of same product type, one speaks tagalog and the other english, people had the impression that the one who introduces his product in english are reputable and can be trusted. They have the impression "this is a rich company with top notch employees". In FM stations here in PH, they have no sense of patriotism when it comes to Filipino language. It seems they want to sound like the American DJs. Japan and other asian countries, use their primary language in every aspect of communication. It seems we priority too much english so foreigners will feel home. But isn't it too much?
@ruperto (1552)
• Philippines
6 Sep 09
thanks Steve. I remember back in school :) we learned that a part of the atom called an electron was, in Pilipino: "dagisik". That electronics was "dagisikan". Everyone was excited because it was new and different... is it really for teachers to say: "the electron is a part of the atom." or say: "ang dagisik ang isang bahagi ng mulpik." I feel patriotic my self. But I think teaching technical terms in Pilipino was very good in the patriotic sense. But then again if it is not effective enough for some reason (subjective) then perhaps it is not really patriotic. Or is it still?
• China
23 Oct 09
Almost all of the pepole can speak English in the Philippines. English is their offical language, so FM radio statins speak English.
@KaraKATAD (246)
• Philippines
7 Sep 09
Well there are a lot of people here in the Philippines that don't completely understand Tagalog/Filipino. Their audience is the general public, and in order to get through to them, it's important to speak both Filipino and English. It's not so much that they don't speak Filipino, it's just that they speak a lot of English as well. I rarely here completely english radio show hosts, a lot of them speak mixed Filipino and English / Taglish. I live in the Visayas and I know a lot of radio stations that only speak Bisaya/Cebuano.
@Simon1223 (905)
• China
6 Sep 09
In the history Philippines used to be a colony of US, and nowadays English is still one of the two official languages of Philippines, so it's not strange that Filipinos could speak good English, though with some accent. Even in the countries where English is not an official language, there're still some English channels, their audiences are foreigners and those young people who want to improve their English. I believe there are more radio stations or channels speak their native languages.
@ashbelx (92)
• Philippines
6 Sep 09
Two months ago I went to my hometown 8 hours by bus from where I currently reside. The radio of the bus I was taking was tuned in to this local FM station and listening to the DJ handling the program at that time was like one of the most trying thing to do. I was embarrassed for her sake because I knew hundreds of other people are listening out there (if they ever have considering the way that particular DJ handles the program).She was trying hard to speak in English,sound like a natural-born English or American,but doing exactly the opposite. She was so full of irrelevant idiomatic expressions which made me wonder if she had a book of idioms right beside her. I know that we have to learn the language in order to be globally competitive but not to the extent that we shame ourselves by doing so. FM station management should handle this issue accordingly or face the risk of losing their audience.