Why are Europe and Asia considered different continents?

@cambiste (1245)
India
September 11, 2009 11:58am CST
This has been running around in my head ever since my first geography class, so i thought i'll put it up in mylot... Why are Europe and Asia not considered the same continent? And why is Antarctica not considered a continent?
5 responses
@williamjisir (22903)
• China
12 Sep 09
Hello cambiste. When I was in the high school, I was very interested in geography. So far as I know, the Ural Mountain is considered to be the dividing line of Europe and Asia while Antarctica is considered to be a continent. Antarctica is a continent where it is too cold for people to live on, except some researchers there. My knowledge on this is very superficial. I wish you to get to know more from some other responses. Good luck to you, friend.
2 people like this
@cambiste (1245)
• India
13 Sep 09
Thanks william. Yes, Antartica is a mystery. Some people told me its made of ice and therefore its not a continent but a giant floating ice block. I think they were joking. Happy mylotting.
13 Sep 09
Speaking of continental drift, a long time ago, Antarctica, Australia, Africa, North and South America and Europe together with India all were part of a single continent which geologists have called Gondwanaland. Over a period of several hundred million years, this "Super continent" broke up and drifted apart to make up our present continents. The present Asian continent is made up of several smaller continental masses that came together again over a period of several million years to form the present Asian land mass. India was originally joined to Africa, but broke away and drifted northwards until it met the Asian continental mass. The Himalayan mountains are the result of this collision. India is still moving northwards and the Himalayans are still being pushed up higher. This is not theory, scientists have been able to directly measure both the rate at which India is moving northwards and the rate at which the Himalayas are being driven higher.
1 person likes this
• China
13 Sep 09
Hello jw... I read your response with keen interest. I am glad to know some more knowledge about it from your response. Thank you so much for it.
1 person likes this
@breepeace (3027)
• Canada
11 Sep 09
I've always been taught that Antarctica was a single continent. In fact, I don't think I've ever heard that it was disputed as one, even while some people considered Europe and Asia to be Eurasia, or combined with Africa to become Eurafrasia.
@cambiste (1245)
• India
13 Sep 09
Eurafrasia? That is strange. No matter where you look, you'll find that there are 7 continents. So in reality, this is just for the sake of naming that it was decided; similar to the conventional direction of current? Honestly, Eurasia makes a lot of sense. It was real confusing to know that they are separate and Antarctica doesn't exist as well. Thanks for replying. It was helpful. Happy mylotting.
@breepeace (3027)
• Canada
14 Sep 09
I've heard anywhere from 5 to 7 continents, depending on who you ask. Africa - America - Antarctica - Eurasia - Oceania or Africa - America - Antarctica - Asia - Europe - Oceania or Africa - Antarctica - Eurasia - Oceania - North America - South America or Africa - Antarctica - Asia - Europe - North America - South America - Oceania And yes, some purists do believe a continent to be a single landmass so they would refer to the continents as Eurafrasia, America, Antarctica and Oceania.
1 person likes this
@cambiste (1245)
• India
14 Sep 09
Oceania? Is that the same as Australia?
@maximax8 (28558)
• United Kingdom
11 Sep 09
Turkey has 3% in Europe and 97% in Asia. Europe is the continent that I live in. Egypt is in Africa but is more similar to Israel and Jordan that are in the Middle East and Asia. The Far East is a different part of Asia. We have to believe what the atlas tells us. Sometimes names of places change like Leningrad to St Petersburg. I have traveled in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australasia and The Americas. I don't know much about Antarctica.
1 person likes this
@cambiste (1245)
• India
13 Sep 09
Thanks for the information share. I heard people do live in Antarctica. However, even if there is no country or people in Antarctica, that should be of little concern in terms of continent. I feel Since Antarctica is a mass of land (or ice), it should be considered a continent. Happy mylotting.
1 person likes this
@breepeace (3027)
• Canada
14 Sep 09
Actually Antarctica has NO permanent population. There are around 1000 to 4000 researchers and scientists who live there, though. A good friend of mine is there right now working for the South African weather service.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Sep 09
i feel like we go to the same school. haha just because were learning about that to in world history. and my teacher so doesn't believe in europe and asia. he calls it euroasia but it says for the sake of the matter and becomes it might be on the test like act or something he says just make the state happy and call it a continent. he's a weird teacher alright. i don't understand why their not together its weird....so i couldn't tell you
1 person likes this
@cambiste (1245)
• India
13 Sep 09
Thanks lol. Our teachers have a lot in similar then. Our Chem prof used to say that everything in the text was junk, but learn it for the exams sake lol. True, many people refer to the two continents as one: Eurasia. Happy mylotting.
@jwfarrimond (4474)
11 Sep 09
Europe and Asia have been regarded as separate from ancient times and the reason for the distiction has been lost in the mists of antiquity. Those ancient geographers placed the boundary of Asia and Africa at the Red Sea and the boundary between Europe and Asia at the Ural mountains. Although these boundaries were fixed on long before scientists learned about the geological distinctions between the continents, the ancient boundaries have been confirmed by geological research that shows that Africa and Asia are divided by the spreading rift of the Red Sea and that the Urals, which mark the boundary between Europe and Asia, represent a joining of two continents that were quite separate in the geological past.
1 person likes this
@cambiste (1245)
• India
13 Sep 09
Thanks a lot! I see. I had a feeling it had something to do with the time when the exact geological features were unknown. I've heard of theories stating that the continents had rifted apart due to tectonic movements millions of years ago. Its not strange to think Europe and Asia were separate at the time either.