The natural end of life has changed.

@marguicha (81880)
Chile
September 17, 2009 12:10am CST
Due to the use of so many machines, people can be kept alive in circunstances that they cannot breath by themselves or their heart or brain will nor ever work anymore. What do you think it should be done in those cases? Turn off the machines after a certain time? Keep them on? I have an aunt that I love that had a brain tumor. The doctors said she could have surgery in spite of her being over 80 years old. She has been through all kinds of tortures and now, after eleven days, the doctors say there´s no use and they will take her out of the ICU while the family looks for a home that can have her until she dies. She hasn´t regained concience but as her insurance didn´t cover all this, my cousins will have to sell the apartment where she lived. I am not a believer but I think that sometimes science wants to play God. I feel that it is very comforting for the dying person and for his loved ones if the sick can die in their homes, surrounded by their loved ones. Would you prefer a machine that kept you alive or a shorter life?
4 people like this
11 responses
@malpoa (1218)
• India
17 Sep 09
I would like to be alive if I am healthy and kicking. I do not want to disturb anybody. Keeping the heart beat alive by life support machines or by artifical ways is good only if the doctors are sure about reviving the person back to normanlcy. And doctors are never 100% sure about anything, even if they are, it turns out to be one such dissappointing case!! Being alive in vegetative state for what??? I do not understand the need of it. When a person is not even able to open his eyes or even communicate with others, there is no point in keeping him alive on machines. I certainly would nt like to be one such case. I think when the organs or body deteriorate to a level where normalcy can never be attained, people should let the person rest in peace.
2 people like this
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
17 Sep 09
It is a torture for the sick but also for the family.Because, while the doctors give false hopes, they want to believe it. And in some cases it is also an economic ruin.
1 person likes this
@malpoa (1218)
• India
18 Sep 09
Oh yes, I was suddenly reminded of a case which happened in UK which was the hot topic a few months ago. It was regarding a father and daughter, the daughter being on the life support for 32 years!!! Imagine 32 years of ordeal for both the father and the daughter. Finally he seeked permission from court to remove the life support. It was a huge controversy then...And the term mostly seen on paper was mercy killing...
1 person likes this
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
21 Sep 09
I think that shouln´t be done. PERIOD! The money they use in stretching a life that it´s not there anymorew could be used to save people who stand chances of survival
1 person likes this
@lelin1123 (15645)
• Puerto Rico
17 Sep 09
A machine keeping you alive is not living. So I would go for the shorter life. It doesn't make sense to have hospital bills going up day by day when a person is just not going to come out of it. Especially an elderly person. It just doesn't make a bit of sense to me. Why prolong the inevitable. I agree with you on dying at home among your loved ones. That is the way to leave this world. Its more meaningful and loving then being hooked up to so many machines in a hospital.
@daeckardt (6245)
• United States
17 Sep 09
I think if it came to a point where a machine was the only thing keeping me alive, I would rather be allowed to die. Sometimes, that can be the hardest decision for a loved one to make, but it is really not fair to anyone to keep a piece of meat on a breathing machine if there is no way they can become productive again. When a person is 80 years old, they have had a long life already and it doesn't make sense to keep them on a breathing machine if it is just going to prolong the inevitable. It is just spending money that will make the hospital more money and push up our insurance rates. we should stop playing god and accept that we are all mortal. BTW, I had to make this decision with my mother. It was not easy, but it wasn't fair to anyone to keep her on a breathing machine when her blood was septic and she had less than 10% chance of survival if she had been in good health. After a week in ICU and two episodes of difibrillation, we told them to let her go.
1 person likes this
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
21 Sep 09
Life has an end and we shouldn´t make ist horrible because of science. It´s better to die with our loved ones holding our hands that to die at a hospital room full of machines.
1 person likes this
@drakkar (50)
• Philippines
17 Sep 09
No, I would not prefer machine to kept my love ones alive especially when they in age. There are cases when I observe people in age who are dying but because their family wont let go, they were being save my the machine. If I were to ask, Id let go, because it could only hurt me more seeing my love ones suffering from pain just because family members wont let go. Besides it is not ours to hold. If its Gods will we have nothing to do with.
1 person likes this
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
18 Sep 09
I feel the same way you do and after this happened, I talked to my both daughters that I would not want that if I were in the same case.
1 person likes this
@inedible (773)
• Singapore
17 Sep 09
I can't do much while hooked up to a machine, so unless there's a chance of recovery, I'd much rather just quit. Not much point in being alive if I don't get to do anything.
1 person likes this
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
18 Sep 09
They took the machines away today. She will not regain conciousness so there´s no point in having her there.
@prinzcy (5082)
• Malaysia
17 Sep 09
The machine can keep a person alive but also giving hope to the family that one day that person may wake up and recover. However, it also prolonging the torture to the patient. It's a hard decision to make and we are not to judge as we are not in the situation. If something like that happen to me, I do not wish to be bind by the machine. It's god enough to be surrounded by my love ones.
1 person likes this
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
17 Sep 09
After what has happened to my aunt, I talked to my both daughters and told them I did not want that kind of end.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (9411)
• Philippines
18 Sep 09
Science had been of so much help, definitely. But as to the case you've mentioned, I think it is the prerogative of your aunt to go into surgery. She had wanted to live more years. If I were 80, I'd never want to see any doctor nor hospital anymore. But since she made the option to go into the operating table, your cousins had no choice but to grant that. Euthanasia is out of the question. She is in a coma but she is alive. But, there is always a but, I don't think it is essential anymore to do everything in their power to keep her alive. She might go, the moment they take her away from the ICU. It is just a matter of little time. Keep praying.
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
18 Sep 09
I think that my aunt (who had a brain tumor) was not capable of fully understanding what they would do to her. The last time I saw her, she called me by three different names (other cousins of mine) and her discourse was impaired. Now, loving her, I only hope that all this ends quickly. For her and for us.
• Philippines
20 Sep 09
The medical field had taken advantage of your aunt and cousins. They made them believe that something could still be done. I do hope your cousins recover from the financial trauma. Taking care of a loved one is already physically straining. Add the money matters, that is devastating. My prayers for your family, especially your beloved aunt.
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
21 Sep 09
Thank you eileen. Yes, there´s also the financial issues. I wouln´t want that for me. I´d rather leavce my hard worked for belongings to my girls than to a hospital and doctors so they can have mansions
@ANTIQUELADY (36491)
• United States
17 Sep 09
I do not believe in prolonging the inevitable. I do not want to be hooked up to any machines. I really think it is cruel what they did to youyr aunt. i'm sorry they put her through all that.
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
18 Sep 09
I think like you do, friend. But it was the doctors who told my cousin that my aunt had very good chances of being well again. It was AFTER the surgery that the doctor told my cousin of the risks, then, now and in the future. So my cousin did what the doctor said it should be done. And I have seen that cruelty in doctors in other circumstances. It seems that they see the patients as animals to experiment.
1 person likes this
@ANTIQUELADY (36491)
• United States
18 Sep 09
I think all the doctor's see aroung here are dollor signs. I think they are very greedy.
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
21 Sep 09
I agree to that!!!
@EliteUser (3971)
• Australia
19 Sep 09
Hey, To tell you the truth, I don't think that I would want a machine keeping me alive, because you almost can't even think for yourself, I think that I would probably rather die than do nothing for myself, being kept a live with a machine. Make sure you have a good day, Happy Lotting!!
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
19 Sep 09
In this case it´s worse because she´s unconcious and, according to one of the doctors, she won´t regain conciousness.
• United States
18 Sep 09
Isn't the purpose of a "living will" so that each and every individual can make that decision for themselves rather than have it made for them?
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
18 Sep 09
I don´t know if we have that in our countrey. We can express our desire to donate our organs, but I don´t know about this.
• United States
17 Sep 09
I really think it depends on the situation. I would not want to be hooked to machines per say, but, I did have a cousin who was paralyzed at 18 years old. He could not move from his neck down and was only living by machines. They were a complete part of his live. He recently passed away at age 33. We were able to spend a lot of time with him that would hav ebeen cut short if not for the science! Mark was amazing, he went to and finished college and became an architect. He had a computer that was voice activated and was just a remarkable person. I would say, he was living. He had nurses with him most of his time. They stretched him, put him to bed, fed him, washed him, but he was living! He created some beautiful houses for his father to build for people. I am grateful to science for allowing him to live what he could for his life!
@marguicha (81880)
• Chile
18 Sep 09
In the case of my aunt she is over 80 and it was her brain that did not work properly. It´s a completly different situation. Your cousin could have a meaninful life in spite of his limitations. You can also think of Hawkins, the physics genious. He can do his work in spite of his body.