Expensive toys and commercial hype

By Amy
Abernathy, Texas
October 25, 2009 1:41am CST
Do you fall for wanting to buy the most expensive, well known toys for your child - with all the bells and whistles? I know, since my little one likes to help me in the kitchen and love my nieces play kitchen - I really want a Step2 kitchen for him! With all the bells and whistles and a Handy Mandy work bench. I love the array of toys out these days they have and try to choose ones that encourage development and imagination - with the minimum of bells and whistles so he can figure out things, use his imagination - I believe its not otys but interaction/participation of parents that are most important. When they can be afforded. I think we should remember though, before we fall for the hype (half to late for me) that we need to get these very expensive toys that drain their batteries quickly, that there were many genuises, artists and other great contributers to society born in times when toys were few or they were too poor to have them...and al the electronic toys they have nowadays were nonexistant once upon a time. I think we need to remember that encouraging imagination and using your mind doesn't take a lot of toys or expensive toys. I encourage things like Melissa and Doug toys. For those reading this discussion who don't have a lot of money to spend on toys - don't feel discouraged - or that you're failing because you're working hard to put food on the table and can't afford a lot of toys or a selection of toys despite the asserttion of having such an important role. Providing a well balanced diet and excercise will ensure that your child's mind and body develops as it should. Proper food and excercise prepares a child for learning each day. And remember, engage your child everyday in activities that develop their mind, pretend games, going outdoors and exploring, going to the store and other public places and visiting with other children. Fun songs with participation. If you can't afford toys, you can make them as well. And most importantly -READ to your child everyday - at least once a day as this is proven to help children develop iq's and learn more efficiently later in life. Turn off the tv, get off the computer and play with your child - YOU are the most instrumental - have the most impact on a child's development not toys with all the bells and wistles. This is my view, my ideas and my suggestions. What are yours? And yes, I still want the Step2 - anything - and covet toys I didn't have when I was young! But I know, logically its alright I can't get them for my snoogs on his birthday in November, as long as I interact with him at home, and take him outside and to the park, he'll get through just fine without the fur real animal or the big dinasaur he can ride on! I read to him every night, and spend time and give cuddles and run around no matter how I feel! And sometimes that's just as good or better...soon though...I will get him a few of those toys that engage the imagination - so that he can play for hours and hours and I can get stuff done - or come on here, instead of losing sleep!
1 person likes this
1 response
• United States
25 Oct 09
Honestly, most children do not really care what toys they get. My nieces and nephews and cousins get so many toys, and it seems like the minute they get them they just get bored of them. They grow out of them so quickly. Most children are addicted to video games. My brother and I and most of my friends all grew up with Nintendo, Playstation, and the Sega systems. Honestly, I didn't know anyone who did not have a Gameboy. Guess what is so crazy, my friends and I grew out of that fast, graduated to laptops and Nintendo DS systems, and most of our Gameboys are in the hands of another child or person, or they are collecting dust in a large pile of electronic toys. I know parents who have gotten their children the best toys ever, my family was notorious for that, but how long did those toys last? Some of those toys were given to other children, broken, put on eBay, or sold to other people at Frank & Sons Collectibles. I have kept very few toys from my childhood, my Baby Lite Brite, and my collectible Barbie Dolls and Disney Princesses because I hear those are worth a fortune on eBay. I remember when my mother bought me a talking Ariel the Little Mermaid for Christmas, and she broke so many times, and my mother returned her so many times, that my mother just got fed up, and said, "Pumpkin, mommy is going to get you an Ariel doll with the changeable clothes. How does that sound?" I told her, "Okay, I will be happy with that." Well, my Ariel ended up going to some other girl, and I only kept my Belle doll from the "Beauty and the Beast" film. I always thought that Belle was the smarter of the princesses. My toys gave me memories. I loved some of my toys because of the memories I had from them. The happiness they did or did not give me. The things my brother did to some of those toys (Barbie Doll head in the refrigerator, classic), and how closely I held my Baby Lite Brite next to me after finding out that my favorite uncle passed away (my favorite uncle was a magician, and although he was not my biological uncle, I sure as heck thought of him as one). Toys...
• Abernathy, Texas
28 Apr 10
This is a really loaded and detailed response. You are good at those. I've missed it in my time away. Did your parents give you so many toys because of the abuse you had to suffer - not a very good replacement for an abuse free home. Hope things are well with you and yours. Amy
1 person likes this
• United States
29 Apr 10
No, they gave us toys to mostly keep us out of their hair. Parents back then, and even today think, "Well, I don't have enough time to spend with them, so I have to buy them everything that they want, so that they will not buy me while I am working my tail off." Was it healthy? Absolutely not! Toys did not satisfy the loneliness or the need for my mom and dad. I didn't really care about the toys, I wanted my parents.
• Abernathy, Texas
29 Apr 10
Very true. I think I've been out of the loop so long I got you confused with someone else or it was your boyfriend - taking abuse for an inheritance?
1 person likes this