Do you share the religious beliefs of your parents? Why so? Why not??

United States
November 15, 2009 3:29am CST
A survey in the US taken earlier this year shows that a large number (at least 28%) of the current adult population (18 years and older) has moved away from the church affiliation they grew up in. They either join and/or attend a church of another denomination or simply no longer take part in organized religion at all. The report goes on to say this decline in religious participation has long been a practice in Australia. Friends tell me this is true also in India, altho when I visited India, the temple doors were always open and the lines to enter nearly every temple were always long and winding with people standing shoulder to shoulder waiting to enter the temple to see God. And this was with temperatures over 90 degrees. Even with an appointment, we had to wait outside for over an hour to enter the Tirumala Venkateswara Temple and still we were in an unbelievably long line to get inside. I, personally am not affiliated with the denomination I grew up in. When I moved away to another town, I did not find the same warmth and sincerity of religious conviction. I also questioned whether the church was being hypocritical in demanding its parishioners follow rigid precepts under penalty of eternal condemnation to purgatory or hell, while covering up for clergy who commit criminal acts against children and young women and even placing these same men where they continued to abuse others and live a lie; failing to recognize women as equals; continuing to accumulate personal wealth for the church rather than extending more of a helping hand to its poorest and most devoted members. You can say, "Find another church. All of the clergy are not bad. True. But when you find that from the top down bad behavior is purposefully ignored, the perpetrators are shielded, and the victims are made to feel guilty where do you go? What do you do? So tell me, are yo disillusioned about the denomination you grew up in? Did you change? What was the trigger? If you have remained faithful, what sustains you? I am not just asking Americans. Please, I want a world view on this subject. Religion is universal.
7 people like this
20 responses
• Philippines
15 Nov 09
My family and I share same religious or beliefs. And I'm very thankful that they offered me to God through the true church of Christ (Iglesia Ni Cristo). I have heard different preachers but none of them convince me on how to serve God. I remain faithful because I believed that Iglesia Ni Cristo is true.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Nov 09
Great. It is very comforting when you have a good church home. God bless.
@Galena (9123)
15 Nov 09
my mum and her family line are Pagan, which I follow myself. my dad was an atheist that dabbled with spiritualism and I trained asa medium in my teens. so I suppose yes.
@hvedra (1623)
16 Nov 09
Wow, Starbright! How old are you? *grins*
• India
16 Nov 09
Yes StarBright are you from earth or an Alien from outer space.
• United States
16 Nov 09
. Oops...How about 1970? There are days I feel like I was born circa 1770 especialy as it get cold.
1 person likes this
@cannibal (650)
• India
15 Nov 09
Nice discussion. Although my parents and I belong to the same religion, I guess my preferences are poles apart from theirs. You must be knowing that Hinduism hosts almost all types of beliefs. That is why 'conversion' was never required for me. My mum is an agnostic; although during tough times she does take shelter under prayers and poojas. Dad can be said to be a staunch believer. He does follow Hindu rituals. My parents never forced me to believe anything. They were and are totally liberal in this aspect. I do not follow all rituals. I do take part in festivals though. Most of them are so enjoyable. The rituals I follow are the ones I can verify to have some scientific benefits. For instance, we have a festival here called Gudhi Padhwa wherein the tradition says you need to consume crushed neem leaves. Now obviously although neem is one of the most effective medicines we have, its taste makes us run for cover throughout the year. So the festival provides a reason to purify my body. I do not believe in a creator God or for that matter any dualistic god; and I'm an ardent fan of mysticism and the Advaita Vedanta branch of Hinduism. My parents never objected my likings and denial of the family traditions.
• India
15 Nov 09
Hello there cannibal, can you tell me more about this festival, Gudhi Padhwa, I have heard about this, but I have not seen it being celeberated here in south. Of course neem being a medicine it is good for the health. But when I think that you have to consume crushed neem leaves, I really pity you. So how do you take this, as a juice or powder. Do you add anything to make it more easily consumable.
@cannibal (650)
• India
15 Nov 09
Yea the neem Poor me! But we make up for the taste (to a minute extent only) by adding jaggery. And yes, the festival is only popular here in Maharashtra and may be a few scattered places. I only know that the day is considered highly auspicious and generally shopping involving higher amounts is done on the day. Also, since a majority of Maharashtrians are farmers, they welcome the spring season on this day. I mean, the day marks the arrival of spring. I reckon it is also our new year. These ones tell it: http://www.bharatonline.com/maharashtra/festivals/gudi-padwa.html http://www.panditjiusa.com/Gudhi_Padva.htm
@cannibal (650)
• India
15 Nov 09
And we take the leaves and stuff in their original paste format.
@rg0205 (2638)
• Hong Kong
16 Nov 09
I don't share the same beliefs as my mother does. First of all, I don't believe that you should stay with your spouse regardless of what god forsaken thing he/she does. That is something I will never, ever, for the life of me agree with. I believe that life is short and you only have one life to live. God didn't put you here to be beaten and abused and sit there while someone else does that to you. Another thing I don't agree with is homosexuality. I know I will get bashed for this but to me, since there are so many genetic differences, could it not be possible that this could also explain homosexuality too? That it isn't just influence or choice? I have a nephew that is around 6 and he thinks and acts like a girl and he knows that he is actually a boy. Nonetheless, he says he wants to be a woman and feels like he's in the wrong body. This, even if he has a complete family and brothers and sisters. He's the only one who turned out like that. I also do not get the holier than thou attitudes of people who are religious. They like to think they're going to heaven and their church or sect is the chosen one while everyone else should burn in hell. I don't get that. Talk about judging others, really. For me, I am not going to say that I am agnostic. I believe there is a good but as I grew up, I also realized that religion is the interpretation of man and thus, I believe that through the ages man has manipulated the scriptures to his benefit and could also be the reason why some religions think that the men are above women and the importance of a woman is equivalent to that of an animal.
@rg0205 (2638)
• Hong Kong
16 Nov 09
*there is a god - typo. Sorry.
• United States
16 Nov 09
Rg0205: We are on the same page. I could not stay with a spouse who beat or otherwise abused me. I think it would be better to leave him so I would not kill him. No joke. Like you, I have seen and met enough gay and lesbian individuals to know that they are as real and genuine as anyone else. I also know that there is nothing to fear because they have the same hopes and dreams and aspirations as anyone else. As humans, they deserve the same freedoms and rights as anyone else. A lot of crimes against humanity have been done in the name of the Lord. I keep saying I think we as humans got it all wrong. We preach a lot of stuff that doesn't make sensem but if we just half way followed what we preach, we could get it almost right. There have been books deliberately left out of the bible and the translation is questionable in some instances. But I think our biggest mistake is in how we interpret and apply those teachings. At the end of the day, each of us is responsible for our actions and that is how we will be judged. And yes, Rg0205, there is a God and He lives!
1 person likes this
@rg0205 (2638)
• Hong Kong
16 Nov 09
Wow, I love your response and I share the same beliefs. Religions have the power to bring people together but just the same, it is one of those age old things that have caused many wars since time immemorial. Couldn't have given a better response than you have. Thanks for making my day. I enjoyed reading your thoughts very much.
• India
15 Nov 09
I share the religious beliefs of my parents, because I am convinced about my religion. Even though people say that Hinduism is a way of life, and it is not a religion, I beg to disagree on this, and say that Hinduism is a true religion. Even though there are many things which are not right in my religion, I hope the younger generation will take care of it, and change it for the better.
• United States
15 Nov 09
Tirumala Venkateswara Temple - 50,000 to 100,000 pilgrims visit daily. The temple is the richest and the most visited place of worship in the world.[
I visited quite a few temples when I was in India. I spent a month there. What impressed me the most was how deeply devoted so many of the people were. It was awesome. The temples were open all of the time and busy with worshippers every minute. It was inspiring to see people, many with bare feet, making the climb up the mountain to the Tirumala Venkateswara Temple. It was awsome to see the family that was gracious enough to be our hosts enter their prayer room each day without regard for who was around. They never said anything. They just did it. When we visited her parents, their home was an apartment and much smaller. Their prayer alter was in the kitchen in a cabinet. As we sat there talking, without regard for us and with no shame, they went to the alter and offered up their prayers. When they rejoined us, the conversation went on as before. I also saw them practice their religion in their everyday lives. I also saw parades in the street. At first I thought there was a wedding, but I learned they were just giving glory to God.
• India
15 Nov 09
It is quite nice to learn that you have spent more than a month, in an Indian house, and also have visited temples other than Tirupathi and Tirumala.We Indians are like that, and we take our religion and gods very seriously. You must have known about the fasts which the Indian woman undergo as a part of their religious functions. Of course,there are some minus points, which I have mentioned, I would like to high light only one, that is untouchability is still practised in some remote villages. This has to go. For me all Indians and Hindus are the same, and if anybody wants to visit my temple, I will be very glad and happy to show them around so that they can know the true value of Hinduism.
• United States
16 Nov 09
rameshkumaar57: Yes, that is a serious fast - not even water!! Every group of people has something to be proud of and something to be ashamed of. I guess it's human nature. Someone in authority makes a bad decision and it becomes law. It takes forever to change it. The longer people follow those rules the harder it is to change. After many generations someone will look at the stupid rule and decide "enough is enough." They get enough people to rise up and say "No more". Just as the great man Ghandi finally said "Do or die.", India is a nation on the move. There have already been so many changes and so much progress. It is just a matter of time before the rule about the "untouchables" is eradicated and people realize how wrong it is. The US has certainly had its share of problems. Look what we went thru with slavery and segregation. Even with laws protecting our citizens, there are some hearts and minds that never give up and we see in the news that racism raises its ugly head from time to time. We have to take the good the bad and the ugly to make up the whole. I was indeed blessed on my trip to India. I met wonderful people. I was treated like royalty by the hosts and their entire family. I got to see India through the eyes of a native Indian rather than the surface stuff that tourists see. It was wonderful. You cannot help but come away with a new perspective on life after a trip like that. Your eyes are opened a little, to say the least.
@ckyera (17261)
• Philippines
15 Nov 09
hi there starbright! my parents & i as well as my husband and his family shares the same religion. i was born and raise with the religion i am with now and i'm thankful to my parents for this. when i was a kid, they always bring me into children worship services, and they guide me as i grow up and receive the doctrines till i receive the holy baptismal... i am still in this religion coz i understand and have faith in the doctrines that i received and i believe that i am on the right path to salvation come Judgment Day... have a nice day...blessings!
• Philippines
15 Nov 09
me too but trouble is when i was a kid i would roam around the church as if they can't keep me in one chair then i would cry as hell when ever i get lost in the church, specially after the mass.then, they would find me when they hear the cry, i get to sleep in the chair or sit on the pad where we kneel.
• United States
15 Nov 09
Letranknight, I can picture you sleeping in church. Bet you were a really cute kid. Everyone in church probably got a smile out of watching you. Ckyera, it is comforting to be grounded in your faith. I do not doubt my falth, altho I often doubt organized religion.
@ckyera (17261)
• Philippines
15 Nov 09
hehe ...hello letran! you are funny, so didn't your parents scolded you when you do that? haha, well how old are you then? coz on my part, that's not a problem coz e have our own children worship and the lesson are meant for kids and so its not boring at all and we are just like in the school... but i think when my mom starts to bring me in the regular worship services, there's also sometimes that i fell asleep. huh! starbright... good to know that you don't doubt your faith... as for me, just like you i never doubt my faith as well as my religion...
@sid556 (31005)
• United States
16 Nov 09
Hi there Starbright,Great discussion! I was raised Catholic and had friends from all sorts of various religions. I was born in 1956 and so grew up in the 60's and early 70's when all sorts of changes in society were taking place. I will say that as soon as I was able to crawl away from my parent's sheltering wings that I did stop attending church and I actually stopped really believing all that they were desperatly trying to teach me when I was just a young kid. When I was really young, the whole concept of Heaven & Hell and a God that saw all that you did and knew all your thoughts just scared the living crap out of me. As I got older, I began questioning things that just did not make sense to me and that seemed to just anger everyone. I got bored with it all and just wanted nothing to do with it. I guess the doubts and the questioning were a foundation to search for some truths. I've never come up with any concrete answers but I do believe that there could be something out there. I've never joined up with any other organized religions as I prefer to keep an open mind when it comes to these types of things. One thing they ALL have in common is no real proof to back up any of their beliefs. I did not baptize my kids as I feel that is a personal choice. I did talk to them often about various beliefs and it was always up to them. I worked for a medium when I was a teen and that goes totally against the Catholic religion. My parents supported me in that and it led me to search other not so "religious" areas of spirituality. No answers there either but it is all pretty interesting, I think. I will just keep my mind open to all possibilities.
• United States
17 Nov 09
Sid556: With a few minor adjustments, reading your post is like "Starbright, this is your life." I remember, in grade school, I often prayed that I would not die before I got the chance to go to confession and be absolved of my childish sins. I was born before you, so purgatory, that big empty hole, stared us down even more than hell. Especially on Mondays after the weekend, My friends and I often discussed our weekends in terms of the sins we believed we commited, As an adult, after I defected from the Catholic church, whenever I met a minister, I asked questions. I was met with that same resistance. As we talked, they got upset with me and I ended up walking away. I didn't need proof. I just wanted something practical and logical. All of them fell short even at that. They told me the bible said things I came to realize it did not. Well..certainly not in the context they meant. I, too, looked around at other religions as well as "not so religious" areas of spirituality. I bounced off the same brick wall. It was only when I read the bible for myself and finally met a couple of ministers who were true bible scholars and not afraid of my questions, that it started to come together for me. There are still things that have no logical or practical explanation. It is funny how there are people who still claim to know all of the answers. They have made it a for-profit business. I'm sure they will be reckoned with, if we got the "judgment day" part right. All of us should keep an open mind, regardless of our personal beliefs. An open mind is what allows us to grow, learn, embrace diversity, and exercise tolerance. Look how long it took us to figure out the world was round.
@sid556 (31005)
• United States
17 Nov 09
Oh I remember purgatory but I was not as afraid of that. I figured that was a holding place of sorts where I may possibly get a 2nd chance. I remember being extremely nervous about the whole confession thing.
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
20 Nov 09
I have stayed with the same congregation I grew up in. We don't worship the church. We worship God.
• United States
20 Nov 09
Hi, Bestboy19. That is as it should be. The church is merely an instrument. We should never forget why we are a part of a congregation - not for our glory, but for His.
@andy77e (5165)
• United States
17 Nov 09
Well I was lucky to not be in a church that was denominational. So there was no hostility for people coming from, or leaving to, any other denomination. From there, most of my youth, I simply followed what my parents believed because they were my parents, and when you are under their care, you do as they say. At some point, and I don't have a specific age, I started to question everything. This actually built my faith more, because I looked into why we believed somethings and not others, and for the vast majority, I found there was real empirical and scientific reasons for why people believe the Bible. Not everything though. For example, our church taught that we do not go to movies. Why? I have no idea, but it's clearly not in the Bible, and I could never, and still haven't, figured out why they believed that. Since then, that church has moved away from that stance. However, one of the biggest factors had to be my father who told me that he didn't grow up in the church, and originally wasn't a believer. He had questions about the Bible, and by investigating it himself, found it to be true. He told me about his struggles, and what he learned, and that made an impact on me. So in the long run I have pretty much ended up exactly like my parents, but for different reasons.
• United States
20 Nov 09
Andy77e, I like non-denominational churches. All denominations are welcome. Also, they don't seem to be bogged down in rules and regulations that make you scratch your head and ask "Where did that come from?" I also visited churches that thought women wearing makeup or pants was bad, musical instruments were a no no, cremation was forbidden, dancing was not allowed, and men were well within their right to discipline (even strike) their wife if she did not "behave." All of these believers told me the justification for these restrictions were in the bible. For the life of me, I never arrived at that conclusion based on what I read. It was good that your father shared his experience with you. Children are more likely to listen when you speak from personal experience. It makes you more credible. Matter of fact, the case can always be made for learning from someone with hands-on experience .
• Philippines
16 Nov 09
Sharing the belief of your parents may be good up to a certain point. When you are not yet searching for the truth about the real, true church founded by Christ in the New Testament, then stick to the religion of your parents. It would be better if you are convinced of the religion you have chosen, and not just follow the "crowd". You may begin searching for the true religion by reading the Holy Book, especially the New Testament and then follow its teachings.
• United States
20 Nov 09
Rosahito351, whether you follow in your parents' footsteps or not, it is imperative that you research and study for yourself. That way, you are not only going on what you have been told by your parents, but what you personally know to be true. When we pass your beliefs and values on to our children, we should be able to give them a reason rather than having to say "Because it has always been done that way." The New Testament gives us lessons taught by Jesus Christ, but we should not forget the Old Testament that give us the history. Remember, unless we learn from history, we are bound to repeat it.
• United States
16 Nov 09
I have never really believed the same as my parents. I grew up with pagan declinations in a more or less christian household. I can not truly understand the christiam mindset even though i've been exposed to it all my life. As to where to go when your religion seems filled with hypocrits and corrupt people.. i'd go back to the beginning and relearn the original lessons of your faith.. and then become the voice of a new generation speaking the truth without the fallacies of the old corrupt hypocrisies. In short.. this is WHY there are so many denominations of some religions. Some religious denominations or religons in general may proclaim you an outcast or excommunicate you.. but honestly do you want to be a part of a corrupt organization that can only send you in a downward spiral into the deepest pits of acceptable depravity? Which is more holy.. listening to a pedophile or rapist preach about love and acceptance, or cutting off the hand that offends thee and starting anew.
• United States
20 Nov 09
Pagans tend to be of two minds. One believes there are several gods. The other believes thsi is no God. Which mindset is yours? Your recommendation is exactly what I have done. I am constantly delving into the history of religion and what it means. I am reading the bible for the third time (much slower this time). I have study guides. I seek advice from bible scholars to help me understand what I am reading so I have it in context for the times and the events that were taking place. It is an ongoing process - actually a lifetime mission. You are right on point with regard to what some members of some denominations may choose to do if you do not follow their rules and regulations to the letter. I also agree with you that it is better to leave situations that you know are a farce and counter-productive to your Christian health. I will add that most of us deserve a second chance. Should those who lead change their life for the good and sincerely ask for forgivenness, we should forgive them. Sometimes they can draw on their past experience and use it to teach others so they do not fall into the same traps. On the other hand, people who commit crimes against children and women (or anyone, for that matter) should not be placed in a position to be able to commit those same crimes again. People who are violent and abusive have issues that must be dealt with in a professional manner. Pedophilia is an incurable disease and should be treated as such.
@hvedra (1623)
16 Nov 09
No. My parents were what you would call "nomial christian" but they never went to church or taught me about Christianity. I attended a Methodist Sunday school for a short while but that was because the church was very near and the people who ran it were nice. My parents used it as a babysitting thing but I stopped going because I didn't believe what they did - although they were good and kind people to be around I thought it was hypocritical to keep going. Strangely, I am the ONLY member of my family who holds any religious conviction and practices any kind of belief. These are not Christian but as I wasn't actually raised in a belief I haven't abandoned anything. I was Baptised as an infant but that was just something people "did". My one sister briefly attended Catholic church (despite not being Catholic herself) to get her kids into a Catholic school. A lot of people in the UK do that kind of thing - pretend to get their kids into a particular school.
• United States
19 Nov 09
Regardless of their reason, sounds like your parents did OK to let you associate with the nice church people. It is fine that you did not accept the package. At least you got the exposure. I can't blame your sister. Many Catholic schools have a wonderful school program. The unfortunate thing is they miss the golden opportunity to influence young hearts and minds to their way of thinking. I had that opportunity as a child. Neither of my parents were Catholic when I started Catholic school. The nuns were so good, they completely won me over. Guess what, the next thing you knew, my whole family was baptized Catholic. I defected when I failed to find that same thing when I moved away. it was only then that I began to question the whole concept and saw irreconcilable differences.
• Philippines
16 Nov 09
I personally do not have any affiliations with any religious services. As i am free and never will i shove any form of faith down anyone's throat as many families do to thier own children.
• United States
17 Nov 09
I never looked at it as "shoving faith down anyone's throat." I always considered religious teachings as part of what you do for your children. You feed them and clothe them and send them to school for an education. You pass your values down to them. You teach them right from wrong. You also teach them to think for themselves and stand on their own feet. What they choose to do with that education and upbringing is up to them. I suppose there are some dominating parents who intimidate their children and scare them into submission. There are parents who are extremely strict and limit the amount of free thinking and open discussions their children have. I can see where those children may feel like they had their whole life "shoved down their throat." It is too bad when that happens, because the children usually resent it and rebel. They sometimes throw out the good and the bad. Parents then wring their hands and cry "What happened? We didn't raise them like that."
@KrauseHome (35522)
• United States
16 Nov 09
Well, I grew up Mormon and even though all of my Moms side of the family, or most of them still are, I left the Church when I was around 20. I personally always felt there was more to God than what this church could ever offer and then I also did not appreciate the way that my Mom was being treated at the time as well. My Step Father was very abusive and when you tried to complain about this they said he was the head of the household, and you needed to obey him even if what he was doing was wrong. They even told my Mom that their Church does not divorce people so even after she divorced my Step Dad they still said they were still married even though he got remarried again. I did move on to another Church and was baptized in it over 22 1/2 yrs. ago and for me, it was the Best choice I could ever make. I now attend the UPC church or know known as Apostolic as well, and for me this is what I was truly looking for, but I can understand why many as adults choose to leave the Church they grew up in and that is a personal choice for sure. But I too cannot understand someone saying they are Athiest, because how can they really say they do not believe in something? It just might not be what they believed in when they were younger.
• United States
17 Nov 09
Hi KrauseHome: It always breaks my heart when I hear of spousal abuse. I was a volunteer counselor in a shelter for abused women for a while. I know how difficult it can be for the entire family. I am glad your mother got away from it. If I am right, the Mormon belief is that you follow the lead of the husband, no matter what. If he is wrong, then God will take care of him. It may sound sacrilegious, but that is where I apply the non-biblical verse that says "The Lord helps them that help themselves." The fact that you have been with the same churh for over 20 years says a lot for that church. It is hard to believe that atheists exist. On the other hand, without faith, it is hard to understand Christianity. Look at the definition of faith: Faith - belief or trust: belief in, devotion to, or trust in somebody or something, especially without logical proof Some people are just too pragmatic. They need the facts. They have to see the proof. Blessings.
@Harley009 (1420)
• India
16 Nov 09
Good discussion I was born in a traditional Muslim family. And the village also mostly traditionally practicing Muslims only. They think that what they have been doing as they see from their fore fathers is the only truth and that is Islam. I used to talk about the faith with parents and my family members and tried to distill the truth. When I grew up I began to study about Islam from several books, and medias, I understood what real Islam is, thankful to God, I abolished all the bad mixes happened in the traditional Islamic practiced in our area and I adhered only to the true teaching of Islam which agrees with the Guidance of God and Practical demonstration of the prophet. Later I tried to study about other religion like Christianity, Jewish, Hinduism, from their followers, and put forward the questions them, there was no solid answer. Later I was inspired by Ahammad Deedat and Zakir Naik's speaches. Now I am more confident in My belief in Islam, and We have the Clear proof "Quran" Peace.
• United States
17 Nov 09
Harley009, I am glad to hear you say you found the truth in your studies. It is also good to hear that you adhere to the true teachings of Islam. It is a great when you can find comfort in your beliefs. I think Muslims suffer the same problem Christians do in that sometimes the teachings in the "Good Book" lose something when individuals try to interpret and understand. Blame it on human nature. I have read just a little on other religions, but I cannot I say I have looked closely enough to draw any conclusions. The first chapter of the Quran makes reference to Pharoah and Moses and his trek thru the desert. There is even mention of the manna from heaven. The similarities to our Christian Bible are fascinating!! Salaam Alaikum
• United States
16 Nov 09
no,i do not.my brother and i are both of a different faith than my mother. my father was more or less "undecided".i won't say he was an athiest,because that's not accurate,but he never professed a particular belief,at least to me. i won't get into why the division,but let's just say i don't like particulars of the history of her beliefs.
• United States
16 Nov 09
Thank you Scarlet_Woman. I respect your privacy. I think you said more than enough. If you read some of the posts in this discussion, you can see you are not alone. A lot of us defected from our childhood church affiliations.
1 person likes this
@mikeysmom (2092)
• United States
15 Nov 09
i was raised catholic and sent to catholic schools from 1st to 9th grade. i am christian but no denomination. i do not follow the doctrines of any church in particular and choose to interpret and believe what i feel is valid.
• United States
15 Nov 09
So was I. But the Catholic church I see today is not the same Catholic church I grew up in. Had I met the same kind of people as an adult as I did as a kid, I might never have taken a good long look at what I had been taught.
• Philippines
15 Nov 09
well, we share the same catholic beliefs but we don't talked about it often. sometimes my mom talks about it with my cousin but i don't often wanna hear it because it's been told before, I've just been trying my best to do my part and do the right thing by applying the things i learned in this religion but it's not easy with what happening with the World today. but knowing others have successfully done it doesn't wanna make me stop.
• United States
15 Nov 09
It's probably the age difference between you and your Mom, We "more mature types" like to talk about the news and religion and boring stuff like that. We look at all of the little things that happen and pick it apart. About all we can do is try to live the best life we can and follow the teachings we got on how to treat others and take care of ourselves. Just do the right thing.
@syankee525 (6294)
• United States
15 Nov 09
yeah i dont because me and my dad have different veiws on this and it just because a big agrument most of the time. my thing is we all worship God in our own ways
• United States
15 Nov 09
Syankee, there are more people than not that absolutely cannot talk about religion or politics without getting upset. I guess that is why they say you shouldn't discuss those two subjects on the job or with people you don't know well. I extend that to mean don't discuss religion or politics with people who don't think as you do unless you are prepared to walk away. My Mother went a different way from my grandparents, but they were all right with it. My grandmother was really ahead of her time. She thought nothing of visiting other churches. We have a really large family of aunts, uncles, cousins (about 5 living generations) and my grandmother felt it her duty to see as many as she could. We loved to go with her, so I also visited those churches with her. It was fun. Only after I grew up and started looking beyond the music and the church festivities did I start to think differently about my religion.
@chinthit (70)
• United States
15 Nov 09
I think that in most of the "western" world, the tendency to join a different religion is higher than in, say, Asia. I think there are two reasons for this: 1) there is more of a tendency for young people to "rebel" against their parents, and 2) there may be more of an independence in thinking. Having lived in the US and in Asia, I see a real difference in that aspect. Personally, I think you are right to question any church, and not follow each ideology blindly. The idea of god or a supreme being is a very personal thing, and each individual must decide how they believe. Any church or religion that demands someone believe something is wrong. I broke away from my parents' religion and it took them a while to get over that, but eventually, once I had my own family, they had to come to grips with it. On a side note, I have found that most organised religions, particularly from the Judeo-Christian-Islam triumvirate are very rigid. You might want to explore other religions outside of that group. Good luck.
• United States
15 Nov 09
I think it is the independence in thinking that causes the break from tradition. No matter how you slice it, so many things do not make sense after a while. There are wonderful teachings and life lessons to be learned in most religions. If properly interpreted and applied, Christianity works. Somehow so many get it wrong. They read or misread and apply their own meaning to the bible. I have looked at some other religions, but not in depth. What do you suggest? I really enjoy learning about religions and cultures other than my own. The knowledge gives you a greater respect for all people.