Do You Ever Make Up Words?

@Maggiepie (7821)
United States
November 27, 2009 3:24pm CST
[b]Hello! Writer, here! I have a ginormous vocabulary, but now & then, I run into a situation in which I need a word, but simply don't know one which fits. When that happens, until I do find a proper term (if one exists), I create what someone once called "wheelbarrow" words, which "carry me across the gap." These words are a sort of place holder. Here are 2 examples, with definitions & uses given: GNURR- (The G is silent) The action a cat makes when it has smelled something it either finds peculiar or otherwise interesting. After sniffing carefully & intently, the cat's mouth opens, & he lifts his head, & the mouth remains opened--often quite widely--for a number of seconds. Sometimes, if the smell is very interesting, the cat will go in for seconds, even thirds, before closing its jaws. (I discovered later that gnurring does have a proper term: "SNEERING." But to sneer has negative associations, so I've continued to use "gnurr," & some of my friends have long since adopted it.) Ex: "Look at Patches! She's gnurring your shoe! What have you stepped in?" SNEEZLE- The tingling sensation in the nostrils felt just prior to a sneeze, but it subsides rather culminates in an actual sneeze. eX. "Wai--wait a second, I...I...ah...hmmm...never mind. Thought I was going to sneeze, but it turned out to be just a sneezle. Now, what did you want to tell me?" So! Anyone else here? If you do this, you're in great company; think of the many words Lewis Carroll coined (which we use every day, not thinking of their clever & uncommon, "artificial" origins!). Maggiepie STALKERS WILL BE EATEN...^..^
1 person likes this
3 responses
@thea09 (18324)
• Greece
29 Nov 09
Has 'spendicious' been done Mags as that is how I feel today, most splendid and delicious rolled into one and even combined.
1 person likes this
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
29 Nov 09
[b] Nope! Glad to hear it, since it means you're in the pink! A friend of mine named Robin, who was in the process of becoming a nun--& thus was trying to break her habit of swearing--would make up swear words. My favorite was "frabblesnatch." Ex: "Now where did I leave my frabblesnatching glasses, anyway?!" I use it to this day! Maggiepie STALKERS WILL BE EATEN BY AN ATTACK CAT!___^..^
@thea09 (18324)
• Greece
29 Nov 09
Ha, can you believe I invented a new word with a typo? Should have read splendicious. Frabble could work as it could turn into those frabbling tourist drivers but I think it lacks a certain to the pointness which comes with a real expletive.
1 person likes this
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
30 Nov 09
[b]Re your typo: De nada. I figured you meant splendiscious (fabulous word! One I shall now steal). I collect really great typos, by the way, my own included! (That also goes for goofs in films) Frabblesnatch was fun, but for a word which really did sound terrible--but wasn't--I liked her "expletive": "Supravaditch!" (suh-PRAY-vah-ditch) (Used when very angry & often, when anger is combined with surprise) " A fun word, indeed. And another I use a lot! Maggiepie WORD MAVEN & FU FIGHTER ;o) [/b]
@vandana7 (62447)
• India
28 Nov 09
Hi Maggiepie, my father has a million names by now, because of my invetiveness or creativeness whatever you would like to call it. Examples tuchka, poochy, bowbow, paapu, baabushka, ... Even my computer has a name. :) We do
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
28 Nov 09
[b]Hi, Vandana--did part of your post get chopped off? Those are cute names, but "Babushka" is Russian" for "grandmother." How did he end up with that? But I'm really not talking of nicknames, here. Instead, I'm talking about coming up with a substitute word for things for which you have no word! I created the word "gnurr" for what I later found was the action called by feline experts, "sneering." The way gnurr is pronounced comes from the cat's mouth looks, if it actually spoke. The tongue is held high against his palette, & held there for long moments. I finally found out why they do this. It seems there is an extra scenting (or maybe tasting) organ high in the back of their throats, & the odd motion & pose they hold enables them to really examine the scent much more closely. That's what I figured they were doing, so it's nice to have my theory confirmed! The other word I made up, "sneezle," was a sort of compromise between "sneeze" & "teasel." I'll let you look that last up, if it's unknown to you. It's an old British term, & when you read the definition, you'll understand why I chose it. But I know of no word that fits the condition (preceding a sneeze) I described. If you know one, please share it here! If I like it as much or more than sneezle, I'll use it! This whole thing began with a recent discussion in which someone (Epicure?) made up a term ("drillion") for a whole number above "trillion." There are already such words as "quadrillion" (4 trillion), but the next level up, though it may have an official term, is as yet unknown to us! I'm not math savvy, so I don't even know where to ask! Do the terms you call your dad mean particular things, or are they just endearments..."sweet nothings," as we refer to them? Maggiepie "WHERE'S THE BIRTH CERTIFICATE?"[/b]
@vandana7 (62447)
• India
28 Nov 09
Yeah, I dont know what I pressed but suddenly the thing was at tag page. And I resigned to my fate. :) Oh! Its nice to know I call dad something in Russian. LOL. Actually I keep making these sounds and I ask dad what am I saying. If you are my real father you should be able to understand what I am saying. Poor chweet old man he tries to make some sense out of my gibberish. Mostly it is sweet nothings. :)
1 person likes this
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
29 Nov 09
[b]Awww...you make me miss all my dads. I had three, who all had a hand in rearing me: my maternal grandfather, Thomas Price, my birth dad, Doyle Crouch, & my step-dad, Norman Jennings. I miss them all, so much. I love it that you have such a sweet relationship! Maggiepie STALKERS WILL BE EATEN BY AN ATTACK CAT!___^..^
@blackbriar (9080)
• United States
28 Nov 09
-giggling- Thanks for the giggles, Maggiepie. Never heard either of these words before now. Glad my vocabulary isn't as ginormous as yours is or I would be leaving a ton of people scratching their heads wondering what something means. lol
1 person likes this
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
28 Nov 09
[b]Hi, Blackbriar! You never heard of gnurr & sneezle because I made 'em up! Yeah, I confess, I'm a word maven. You know, a lot of dictionaries don't even have the word "maven" in them?! Of ALL the words to omit!! Shocking literary deficiency! Anyway, unless I'm conversing with another word buff, I'm sure I do leave a lot of heads shaking! Sorry, but words are my favorite toys! Maggiepie "WHERE'S THE BIRTH CERTIFICATE?"[/b]