Tomamto is a Fruit or Vegetable????

@neha_khan (1803)
Pakistan
November 14, 2006 11:47pm CST
Eat Tomamto
6 people like this
90 responses
• Philippines
22 Jan 07
In the strict sense of the word, fruit is the produce of a tree. But fruits may mean many things. Fruit of the womb, fruit of the lips, etc. Therefore, tomato may be referred to as fruit, fruit of the tomato vegetable.
• Philippines
22 Jan 07
And so tomatoes are still vegetables because they came from vegetables LOL!
• Australia
15 Nov 06
Tomatoes are technically a fruit. A fruit is defined by having seeds. Fruit have seeds, Vegetables don't.
1 person likes this
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
15 Nov 06
i think it tomato is a vegetable
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
15 Nov 06
by UK LAW it is a vegetable ,,
1 person likes this
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
15 Nov 06
what can i say ,,, who is wrong UK or US
1 person likes this
@swarn47 (1707)
• India
15 Nov 06
To really figure out if a tomato is a fruit or vegetable, you need to know what makes a fruit a fruit, and a vegetable a vegetable. The big question to ask is, DOES IT HAVE SEEDS? If the answer is yes, then technically, you have a FRUIT. This, of course, makes your tomato a fruit. It also makes cucumbers, squash, green beans and walnuts all fruits as well. VEGETABLES such as, radishes, celery, carrots, and lettuce do NOT have seeds (that are part of what we eat) and so they are grouped as vegetables. Now don't go looking for tomatoes next to the oranges in your grocery stores. Certain fruits like tomatoes and green beans will probably always be mostly referred to as "vegetables" in today's society. Source: http://www.sciencebob.com/lab/q-tomato.html The confusion about 'fruit' and 'vegetable' arises because of the differences in usage between scientists and cooks. Scientifically speaking, a tomato is definitely a fruit. True fruits are developed from the ovary in the base of the flower, and contain the seeds of the plant (though cultivated forms may be seedless). Blueberries, raspberries, and oranges are true fruits, and so are many kinds of nut. Some plants have a soft part which supports the seeds and is also called a 'fruit', though it is not developed from the ovary: the strawberry is an example. As far as cooking is concerned, some things which are strictly fruits may be called 'vegetables' because they are used in savoury rather than sweet cooking. The tomato, though technically a fruit, is often used as a vegetable, and a bean pod is also technically a fruit. The term 'vegetable' is more generally used of other edible parts of plants, such as cabbage leaves, celery stalks, and potato tubers, which are not strictly the fruit of the plant from which they come. Occasionally the term 'fruit' may be used to refer to a part of a plant which is not a fruit, but which is used in sweet cooking: rhubarb, for example. So a tomato is the fruit of the tomato plant, but can be used as a vegetable in cooking. Source: http://www.askoxford.com/asktheexperts/faq/aboutother/tomato Botanically speaking, a tomato is the ovary, together with its seeds, of a flowering plant, that is a fruit or, more precisely, a berry. However, from a culinary perspective, the tomato is not as sweet as those foodstuffs usually called fruits and it is typically served as part of a main course of a meal, as are other vegetables, rather than at dessert. As noted above, the term "vegetable" has no botanical meaning and is purely a culinary term. This argument has led to actual legal implications in the United States, Australia and China. In 1887, U.S. tariff laws that imposed a duty on vegetables but not on fruits caused the tomato's status to become a matter of legal importance. The U.S. Supreme Court settled this controversy in 1893, declaring that the tomato is a vegetable, using the popular definition which classifies vegetable by use, that they are generally served with dinner and not dessert. The case is known as Nix v. Hedden (149 U.S. 304). While the Tomato can be classified as a fruit, it is officially categorized as a definite vegetable in the United States. The USDA also considers the tomato a vegetable. Strictly speaking, the holding of the case applies only to the interpretation of the Tariff Act of March 3, 1883, and not much else. The court does not purport to reclassify tomato for botanical or for any other purpose other than paying a tax under a tariff act. In concordance with this classification, the tomato has been proposed as the state fruit of New Jersey. Arkansas takes both sides by declaring the "South Arkansas Vine Ripe Pink Tomato" to be both the state fruit and the state vegetable in the same law, citing both its botanical and culinary classifications. But due to the scientific definition of a fruit and a vegetable, the tomato still remains a fruit when not dealing with tariffs. Nor is it the only culinary vegetable that is a botanical fruit: eggplants, cucumbers, and squashes of all kinds (including zucchini and pumpkins) share the same ambiguity. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato
• India
15 Nov 06
tomatoes - fresh n tender tomatoes
good clarification and informative.
1 person likes this
@4277886 (138)
18 Nov 06
Well done! Good job!
• Malaysia
21 Nov 06
That is really complete definition and what ever it is I love tomatoes.
1 person likes this
• India
15 Nov 06
i think tomamto is a fruit.
1 person likes this
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
15 Nov 06
i m changing my mind
1 person likes this
@marthab (325)
• United States
15 Nov 06
tomatoes - these are tomatoes
A tomato is both a fruit and a vegetable. It depends on the usage. Scientifically, it is a fruit. Fruits contain the seed of the plant. A vegetable is any other edible part of the plant. When cooking however, a tomato is used as a vegetable. http://www.askoxford.com/asktheexperts/faq/aboutother/tomato
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
15 Nov 06
thnaks for good information
1 person likes this
• Pakistan
15 Nov 06
it's fruit.. i know it sounds crazy but that's what science tells us.
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
15 Nov 06
vegetable
1 person likes this
@seamonkey (1981)
• Ireland
14 Mar 07
Tomatoes are fruits!
1 person likes this
@raveena (1356)
• India
14 Mar 07
The confusion about 'fruit' and 'vegetable' arises because of the differences in usage between scientists and cooks. Scientifically speaking, a tomato is definitely a fruit. True fruits are developed from the ovary in the base of the flower, and contain the seeds of the plant (though cultivated forms may be seedless). Blueberries, raspberries, and oranges are true fruits, and so are many kinds of nut. Some plants have a soft part which supports the seeds and is also called a 'fruit', though it is not developed from the ovary: the strawberry is an example. As far as cooking is concerned, some things which are strictly fruits may be called 'vegetables' because they are used in savoury rather than sweet cooking. The tomato, though technically a fruit, is often used as a vegetable, and a bean pod is also technically a fruit. The term 'vegetable' is more generally used of other edible parts of plants, such as cabbage leaves, celery stalks, and potato tubers, which are not strictly the fruit of the plant from which they come. Occasionally the term 'fruit' may be used to refer to a part of a plant which is not a fruit, but which is used in sweet cooking: rhubarb, for example. So a tomato is the fruit of the tomato plant, but can be used as a vegetable in cooking.
1 person likes this
• India
9 Mar 07
It's a fruit but used as both fruit and vegetable.
1 person likes this
• Pakistan
9 Mar 07
its vegetable not a fruit
1 person likes this
• Pakistan
12 Feb 07
Tommato is afruit as far as I know I have read it in an Encyclopedia
1 person likes this
@dhigambaram (1133)
• India
29 Jan 07
Fruit ..
1 person likes this
@luckyjohn (169)
• Pakistan
13 Jan 07
well generally we use tomato as a vegetable. but some people says its a fruit... i think it is a fruit..
1 person likes this
• India
15 Nov 06
its a fruit // because its juicyy
1 person likes this
@Mehrotra (228)
• India
15 Nov 06
Huuuuuuuuuuuuuummmmmmmmm me think that its a Vegetable
1 person likes this
@stezieb (2185)
• United States
15 Nov 06
I love tomato's.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Nov 06
I believe that a tomato is a vegetable. I have always thought this, for some reason I just do not believe it could be a fruit.
1 person likes this
@k_varunus (698)
• India
15 Nov 06
vegetable.......
1 person likes this
@VKXY62 (1606)
• Australia
15 Nov 06
The person that made the big post is 100% correct, look at all the undeniable references. Just because some folks refuse to accept what something actually is, is their loss. They will only continue to make the same mistake over and over, never being correct, and never having learned anything. Pumpkin is alo considered a vegetable, but it is the fruit of the pumpkin vine. Have you ever grown potatoes? The potato is the vege part, and guess what, when a potato fruits, it makes little hard green tomato looking seed pods. I believe tomatoes and potatoes are in fact related. Someone else may be able to confirm that one. If you keep wanting to call a tomato a vegetable, you had better come up with some rules for what makes a vege a vege and why a fruit is a fruit. Don't rely on where things are piled up in the shop. Peanuts and cashews are both called nuts, but, peanuts grow under the ground (probably a vege) and cashews are a knob on the end of a tropical fruit, which most people have never eaten.
@VKXY62 (1606)
• Australia
15 Nov 06
TOMATOES ARE FRUIT !
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
15 Nov 06
i think vegetable
@VKXY62 (1606)
• Australia
15 Nov 06
The other person posted this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomato It is most interesting, especially this bit,Botanically speaking, a tomato is the ovary, together with its seeds, of a flowering plant, that is a fruit or, more precisely, a berry. However, from a culinary perspective, the tomato is not as sweet as those foodstuffs usually called fruits and it is typically served as part of a main course of a meal, as are other vegetables, rather than at dessert. As noted above, the term "vegetable" has no botanical meaning and is purely a culinary term. Can you tell us all, a link where it says a tomato in the UK is a vege?Some funny things get debated on this site, great question. How about this one I heard a while ago, In a European country, I think it may have been Germany, a cat is define as a feline that has retractable claws. Some people own cheetahs as pets. Cheetahs do not have retractable claws and therefore must be registered as a dog in Germany or whatever country that law applies in. Is that dumb or what? I know a Cheetah is a type of cat.
@verrohit (310)
• India
18 Nov 06
first of all its not tomamto its tomato.........and it is a vegetable not fruit.........
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
18 Nov 06
Thaanks for reply and spelling mistake.... jenious people often make spelling mistakes
• India
18 Nov 06
I must say Neha u r an excellent person in Hazir-Zawabi.
@neha_khan (1803)
• Pakistan
20 Nov 06
thanks shahid u r a good person...