Death to Animals

@p1kef1sh (45648)
January 5, 2010 11:53am CST
Those that we are about to eat anyway. This discussion is really aimed at the carnivores amongst us. I am a very happy meat eater and understand pretty well the process by which our burgers, T Bone steaks, Lamb cutlets, Chicken nuggets etc reach our plates. But if you had to watch an animal be slaughtered and then eat whatever product the carcass was turned into - could you?
14 people like this
40 responses
@uath13 (8227)
• United States
6 Jan 10
I do my own butchering & have absolutely no problem with eating it. Come spring we hope to have a new batch of chickens running around & Deer is always welcome on the table. No cattle yet but if we ever get the fencing some meat goats might even join the feast someday.
3 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
I would love to be in that position. But there's no easy way here these days. I'd have to buy a lot more land too.
2 people like this
@uath13 (8227)
• United States
6 Jan 10
I have about 6 acres myself & I kinda claim the 2 vacant lots beside me ( who's going to challenge the guy with the axe? ). So there's decent room out here.
1 person likes this
@MrKennedy (1996)
6 Jan 10
I believe I could, and reckon I would actually enjoy it more knowing that I hunted for the meat and prepared it myself I am an avid meat-eater and could never even fathom becoming a vegetarian. However, I would never actually cause unessecary harm onto animals, such as kicking a dog for sick amusement
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
That's a view that I share. I abhor cruelty to animals.
1 person likes this
• Canada
6 Jan 10
I share that view. I love my sheep. I provide every possible comfort for them. In exchange for my diligent care and concern for their health and welfare, they give me meat that I can eat and share with others. They would have a much tougher existence out in the wild. Freedom has it's price. Predators, parasites, and lack of food and shelter are some. The predators are not as humane in killing them as we are. At least we stun them first, so they don't know what is happening. The predators go for the jugular and it takes many minutes to suffocate them, before they pass out and are eaten alive.
@blackbriar (9095)
• United States
6 Jan 10
I have and always will, p1ke. I didn't actually witness the kill but I saw, touched (small prayer of thanks), took pics and even helped gut and butcher the 12-point buck my neighbor brought down on our property just over a year ago. He was one delicious animal...
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
I've never eaten neighbor. Are they tasty! LOL.
• United States
6 Jan 10
Very! You should try it some time...
@dragon54u (29014)
• United States
5 Jan 10
No, I would not like that. Sometimes I will go a few days without meat because of the inhumane ways that my country raises and slaughters meat. I will not buy ordinary eggs, either, as those chickens are never allowed to move around but kept in tiny cages their entire adult lives. I will only buy free range eggs. And who's to know whether they really are treated well? In the summer I buy eggs from the farmers around here. I like meat but I've cut way back on it in the past few years because of the way the animals are raised and slaughtered.
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
5 Jan 10
Over here there has been a massive backlash against factory farming - but it still goes on of course. I understand that in some states in the US people can be prosecuted for NOT spraying chemicals on their crops! Now that's madness to me.
2 people like this
@dragon54u (29014)
• United States
5 Jan 10
It's a mad, mad, mad, mad, mad, mad world.
1 person likes this
@anklesmash (1417)
6 Jan 10
it probably would not put me off as i have a very strong stomach.I have watched documentaries about abatoirs showing the slaughter of animals and i am still a commited carnivore.
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
I've seen those too. I think that it's important that we know where our food comes from.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jan 10
I live in the foothills of the Appalachian mountains, in north Georgia near Atlanta. There are more F-150s, 30.06s, and hunting dogs than sense around here. Yes, I've watched a deer hunted down (for food, not sport) and killed, helped to clean & dress it, and cooked it myself before eating it. My mother splits the cost of a cow that she picks out while it's still alive every year from the 4-H fair, pays 1/2 the butcher fee, and stores the meat in her deep freezer. In the fall, my husband's buddies hunt for sport & bring us the carcasses (they only want the heads for trophies, they know we'll use the rest). We dress them, eat them, and freeze what's left. Winters would be much harder otherwise. Is hunting less pursued over there than here? It just seems to be an odd question for anyone who's ever been around hunting, whether they would eat what they'd killed. Why else kill an animal, if not to eat it?
2 people like this
@Sandra1952 (6052)
• Spain
5 Jan 10
Hello, Pikey. I'm afraid I'd have to turn vegetarian in that case! I do like meat, but I couldn't watch it being slaughtered and then eat it. Some years ago, we went to a local farm to buy a goose for Christmas. The farmer's wife asked if we wanted to pick out the one we wanted. My husband liked the idea, but I headed for the car and left him to it. I could never have eaten the goose if I'd seen it running around. It was delicious though. My husband and his friend are keen fishermen, and recently they caught an enormous sea bass. I was happy to cook it for the 4 of us, but he had to do all the necessary first - out of my sight.
1 person likes this
• Spain
5 Jan 10
I'm not sure I'd agree with your term 'sacrificed.' As I understand it, the animals we eat owe their continued existence to our need for food. I certainly don't agree with killing animals for the fun of it, but cows, pigs, sheep and poultry are primarily reared for food. I'd like to think they have a good life before they're slaughtered, but how can we really know?
1 person likes this
@Galena (9124)
5 Jan 10
the term sacrifice means to make sacred. I think it is a good term for what we do for the sake of eating. we take life and then take that life into our own. if only more people sore it as sacrifice, something to be revered and appreciated, we'd have a better world
1 person likes this
@royal52gens (5366)
• United States
5 Jan 10
We raised and processed our own turkeys and chickens. We raised other animals for food but we had those processed by a professional butcher shop. The good side of doing this was we knew what the animals had been fed and how they were cared for. There never a question of whether the meat was suitable for consumption or not. The freezer was always full. We never went hungry. We were involved in the actual process of preparing the meat for the freezer. We learned about keeping sanitary conditions. This experience as a kid taught us all life lessons for our futures. By the way, our turkeys and chickens had very little fat under the skin. The birds I see in the grocery store have too much fat under the skin and they don't taste fresh as homegrown birds.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
5 Jan 10
I will not eat any poultry that is not at least free range. Battery conditions simply force the bird to gain weight unnaturally and be pumped full of anti-biotics etc. Things that they don't do in the wild.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Jan 10
They don't pump poultry full of antibiotics--it's illegal to do it. Beef and pork can receive antibiotics, but not poultry.
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
Not in England it's not.
@GreenMoo (11842)
15 Jan 10
I kill, prepare and cook our dinner fairly regularly. It´s not so bad once you get used to it, but it took gritted teeth the first time and it´s not something I look forward to. In answer to your question though, watching an animal be slaughtered in a standard meat processing facility then eating the product is not something I´d welcome. Avoidance of such facilities, the rather barbaric practices and questionable food values, is exactly why I´d rather do it myself.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
15 Jan 10
I think that it all depends on your mindset. If you understand that you need to kill the animal to live yourself then it is somehow easier. Personally I've killed fish and seen chickens, cattle and lambs killed. Tasty they were too! Happy New Year.
2 people like this
@GreenMoo (11842)
17 Jan 10
I don´t NEED to kill to eat as I could go to the supermarket or just eat vegetables. However, I PREFER to as I feel my animals have had a better life than mass produced meat and I personally believe that my body was designed to eat a small amount of meat.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Jan 10
Sure, because I grew up on a farm. That's just normal life, getting ready for the year by calling the neighbors in to slaughter and dress the meat. We also shared the proceeds with the neighbors as payment for their help. Although when I was young, we had a gorgeous yearling named Samson, who my sister rode, that nobody could eat once we discovered the roast for that night was part of him. He used to lay down and put his head in my lap to have his ears scratched! Even Daddy couldn't eat the meat and we gave it away to families who didn't have a lot.
1 person likes this
• Canada
6 Jan 10
Yes, I also have a few horses and they are my pets. I could never consider eating them and it upsets me that others can regularly eat horse meat. But, some people eat cats and dogs, too. Some, cook and eat insects, ants, spiders and such. I don't think I could do that either, in this society we live in. BUT.....If we were starving and there was nothing else, it would have to be, unsettling as it might be. Or it could be traded or a cow.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
I don't associate the US with eating horse meat but I don't see why not. Here in the UK we view horses as pets and so there'd be an outcry, but really they are just as nutritious as other animals.
1 person likes this
• Canada
6 Jan 10
Well, sometimes. I can see a lamb or a pig or a cow killed and still eat it afterwards. But when you kill chickens, it smells with the hot water you use to pluck the feathers off, so them I don't want to eat afterwards. To me, it is just a necessity of life. If we were back in the pioneer days, if you wanted to eat, you had to kill something once in awhile or you went hungry. Vegetables don't last very long in your tummy and you pretty much have to be eating 24/7. Meat gives you the strength to actually do some work. And there is plenty of work to be done in this world. These people that are against killing animals to eat them, and try to say that vegetarianism is the only way, can't be working physically for a living. They just wouldn't have the energy to do it. Or they would have to have a break every 20 mins to eat another carrot. lol I find it extremely interesting when people try to say that humans are naturally vegetarians and not meat eaters, when science proves them wrong. We are omnivores and eat everything. Our digestive tract is designed for it. So are our teeth. If some people are appalled at killing an animal and prefer to only eat vegetables, that is fine, but similar to Religious groups that try and 'convert' everyone to their way of worshipping, I don't feel it is right of them to condemn us majority that are only doing what we were designed to do.
• United States
6 Jan 10
Well said, Annie!
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
I agree entirely Annie. I saw a programme recently where a vegan, braver than most, watched the process from birth of calf to burger from it on the plate (which he didn't eat). But his argument was that we don't NEED to eat meat. But that doesn't mean that we have to refrain from doing so. The argument that in the 21st century we have enough choice to permit abstention from meat eating doesn't wash with me. It's fine if you want animals to die out, farmland to become dustbowls and wildlife to become mariginalised not to mention the effect on employment. Nut cutlet anyone?
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18279)
• Greece
6 Jan 10
Hi Pikey, I used to feed the ducks and say I would never eat one, and I wouldn't eat venison as I used to think they were very beautiful, but nothing yet has put me off lamb chops, even when I spot them gambolling around just before Easter sunday when they are destined for the spit. I've eaten fish after seeing it die when caught but I'd prefer not to watch my lamb chops get the chop all the same.
1 person likes this
• Canada
6 Jan 10
Yes, I raise hundreds of lambs every year for people (me included) to eat. It is a very desireable meat. Very tender young lamb. We usually have them sent to slaughter around 4 - 6 mos of age, because we feed them grain instead of grass, so they gain much faster and are very tender and succulent. Mmmmmmm. But, I personally, have never killed one, except for humane reasons, and that is still difficult, but necessary. I just drive them to the butcher and pick them up in a box, all cut and wrapped, nice and cleanly done, ready to eat. Yummmm. But, if I was in the pioneer days, someone on the farm, or a neighbour, would be designated as the murderer for us all to be able to eat. Six of one, half a dozen of the other. Somehow, I don't have the slightest problem killing the fish and filleting it and eating it immediately afterwards. Of course, I caught it, too, so there is some pride involved, as well.
1 person likes this
@weasel81 (2502)
• Australia
5 Jan 10
yeah we do it, home kills to put in the frezzer. that is what happened to my heifer i'd raised a few yrs back. (she ran away from home, and i decided to put her in the frezzer instead free beef) we normally don't do it to those who we know were pet lambs. dad and a friend do the killing then our friend, acts as the butcher and i will help pack the meat. save a lot of money having it done that way if you can get it done. got one great big beef steer there to get round to killing at some stage.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
There are few people licensed to home kill in this country - at least for animals like cattle or sheep and pigs. But if you can then why not?
• Canada
6 Jan 10
In Canada, the regulation is that if you are only killing it for your own consumption, you are legally allowed to kill, dress and butcher it on your private property. But you are not legally allowed to sell the meat unless you have it killed at a licensed, inspected abbatoir, unless you have gotten a special circumstance certificate for a home kill because it would not be humane to transport the animal to the abbatoir.
• Estonia
5 Jan 10
I don't usually bother myself with such questions. It brings no positive effect for me, I still have to eat meat to stay healthy, so it's not good for me to think about such things. Anyway, I've worked at meat factory to earn some extra cash one summer. I know, that meat factory is far from slaughterhouse, there are carcasses but not living animals. Still, there were some pretty gross scenes every day and awful smell in some rooms. During the time I've worked there I haven't lost my appetite for meat. But still, I don't know how would seeing slaughtering of animal result on my interest to meat.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
6 Jan 10
I am sure that working in a meat factory is extremely unpleasant at times. But it's a necessary work.
• Estonia
7 Jan 10
Yea, but someone has to do this job too.
@nannacroc (4049)
5 Jan 10
No. But I could forget it and go somewhere else to eat one of its family.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
5 Jan 10
You kill mine and I'll kill yours?
@nannacroc (4049)
5 Jan 10
Fairy Nuff.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jan 10
One time someone gave us some chickens. They were raised for eating so, either my mom or my dad, can't remember which, killed them and we had to help pluck the feathers. Ever smelled wet chicken feathers? YUCK! But, once Mom fried it up and put it on the table, it was a different story. So, yeah, I guess I could.
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@p1kef1sh (45648)
5 Jan 10
I have smelled wet chicken feathers and plucked many pheasants in my time Bo. But they dry out in the oven and taste so good. NOT the feathers. LOL.
1 person likes this
• Canada
6 Jan 10
Yes, that bloody hot, wet feather smell that turns me off. But I don't have to kill my own anymore. I raise 50 - 100 at a time each summer, and I have to take them all to an abbatoir that is gov't inspected, or else they are not legal for me to sell any. And that suits me fine.
1 person likes this
@dawnald (84125)
• Shingle Springs, California
5 Jan 10
I'm pretty squeamish. But I suspect that I could if it were a matter of eating vs. not eating. Once I almost fainted when Dearra gave Cary a really bad bloody nose, so it would take me a while to get used to.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
5 Jan 10
Did the nose taste good? It's all a matter of personal taste.
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@dawnald (84125)
• Shingle Springs, California
5 Jan 10
I was too busy lying on the floor trying not to pass out to get a taste.
@nonersays (2422)
• United States
16 Jan 10
When I was a little girl my dad brought home a little black and white piglet. I named it "Princess" and thought of her as a pet. I would sit and rub her head and talk to her all the time. Then the time came to take Princess to be slaughtered. I didn't see THAT of course, but my dad did let me know that it was Princess who had been made into sausage and bacon and other yummy meaty things. I have caught, cleaned and cooked my own fish. I've watched a deer be dressed, and ate it too. It is sad that the conditions many meat farmed animals live in and are killed in are so horrible when they dont HAVE to be horrible, but I have eaten an animal I've "known" before.
@p1kef1sh (45648)
21 Jan 10
I think that I could eat an animal that I had known too. But I guess that it isn't always easy. I absolutely agree about some methods of meat rearing. Beyond disgusting.
@mzz663 (2776)
• United States
7 Jan 10
I come from a big family and most everyone hunts. I've been out in the woods when the animals get killed and yes, have helped skin and cook the animals. As far as hunted animals go, no I don't have a problem with it. I figure if meat was good enough for a caveman to survive on, it's good enough for me.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
7 Jan 10
I believe that we were designed to eat meat and that to do so is entirely natural.
1 person likes this
@MsTickle (24732)
• Australia
7 Jan 10
No, I could not. I have to be completely disassociated with the process and view the end product as something totally removed from the creature it was. When I first began fishing I found I was a bit squeamish when it came to cooking and eating my hubby's catch. If he would gut, scale, clean, prepare, cook and serve it I could maybe eat it but otherwise...get it away from me. What I do now is put anything I catch in a bucket then I release it when I pack up to go home.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45648)
7 Jan 10
I have never had any problems with catching and killing fish, especially trout. I have seen cattle, pigs and sheep killed and the only time that I really felt bad was for the ones that were penned up at night to be the first the following day. That was quite unusual apparently.
1 person likes this