Where do you get your water from?

@writersedge (22579)
United States
January 8, 2010 4:19pm CST
So many places to get water from now. Of course it depends on where you are, too. If you get your water bottled, what brand is it, and do you know where the source of the water is? If you get yours from a well, is it hand dug, drilled, electric powered, alt. energy powered, hand pumped up, etc. If it's from a city plant or aquafer, what do you know about the plant or aquafer?
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8 responses
@ElicBxn (59694)
• United States
9 Jan 10
we get our water from the city and they get it from either Lake Austin or Town Lake - excuse me - Lady Bird Lake...
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@writersedge (22579)
• United States
9 Jan 10
So are you hinting that the Lake name has changed? Thanks to 911, a lot of our roads have been renamed up here. Causes some confusion since people knew the old names and now they have to learn the new ones. After the movie, Broke Back Moutain, a mountain in VT was changed to that, I don't know what it was before, but I don't think people lived there, just hiked it.
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@writersedge (22579)
• United States
9 Jan 10
No I was a little kid when Kennedy was assacinated. First politician I personally remember. But I remember reading about her in history books. She was quite the woman.
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@ElicBxn (59694)
• United States
10 Jan 10
I turned 10 the day after JFK was assassinated - but since LBJ was a "local" we heard more about him than you might've - Lady Bird owned the main TV station in town and when they were forced to allow another station in town, they developed one of the first cable companies in the U.S. Granted, we only had the stations on the "rotation of the dial" but we went from 1 TV station to 11 very suddenly. We got KTBC (then CBS mostly) and a UHF station that was mostly NBC - and we got 4, 5, 12 and another one out of San Antonio (12 was ABC) and the 2 out of Temple & the PBS station that we were supposed to be getting ANYWAY from San Antonio but didn't very well. The number 7 was useless because that's where KTBC was broadcasting and it was a really powerful signal (its the one then owned by the Johnson's.) Seems there were a few more, but I may be wrong... - oh - #6 was a display of the dials of a temp reading - really boring, but sometimes they played some okay radio station on it...
@carolbee (16244)
• United States
9 Jan 10
Our water comes from a plant that is powered by electricity. The water is good but full of chlorene. We are use to it since we've always lived in Missouri and grew up on this kind of water. We also drink bottled water when at home. I often drink 3/4 ths of the bottle, add tap water and freeze it. The next time I want it the water is frozen so I add more tap water and have ice water in an instant. I reuse the bottle a few times since it is safe. I do like to have water all the time that is cold and ready to drink. Don't like messing around with ice cubes. Our fridge doesn't have an ice maker, on purpose.
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@writersedge (22579)
• United States
9 Jan 10
Chlorine ruins the taste for me, esp. in a restraurant, can't taste the food, only the chlorine. A guy, my husband works with, said the ice maker house broke while he and his family were on vacation. Flooded the kitchen, ruined the floor, overheated the water pump and cost them lots of money. Until then, I thought an ice maker might be nice, but now I don't. So I can see why you don't have an ice maker, your way is safer for your house. I not only mess with ice cubes, I make freezer pops.
@carolbee (16244)
• United States
9 Jan 10
I have heard plenty of other horror stories about ice makers which is why the last fridge we bought doesn't have one. I think the flooding is fairly common.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
10 Jan 10
They have to replace their floor and their water pump will probably die soon if it hasn't already.
@MrKennedy (1996)
14 Jan 10
When I was younger (about 6 or 7 years old), my aunt and uncle used to live up in a mountainous area of Canada, where they had their own spring. When I went to visit them, the water there is the best I've ever had in my life, and I even used to take with me some bottles so I could enjoy it when I returned home I only drink water and tea. Soda and milk (on its own) makes me feel kinda sick, so I just avoid them. Water is always good for me.
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@writersedge (22579)
• United States
14 Jan 10
Yeah, pure mountain spring water is the best tasting. Nothing beats it, no wonder you wanted to take some home. Your aunt and uncle probably could have started a bottling plant! Thanks for responding and take care
@barehugs (8992)
• Canada
9 Jan 10
This Post is different and astute! We get our water from two very interesting sources, depending on where we are. At our summer home in Canada the water comes from a shallow well (12 feet deep)situated in a ravine behind the house. A shallow-well electric pump supplies the house with all the pure drinking water we can use. When we are at our winter home in Alamo, South Texas, our water comes directly out of the Rio Grande River via the Alamo Filtration System. .75 cents fills our 5 gallon jug which lasts most of a week. The water is purified by several complicated methods, and it makes good tea. I would not be able to differentiate between Texas Tea, and the Tea we drink in Ontario Canada.
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@writersedge (22579)
• United States
9 Jan 10
Wow, Canada and Texas. Pretty neat. 12 feet is extremely shallow. There must be a mountain source or something for it to still be pure. Alamo must have a pretty big population. Thanks and take care.
@GardenGerty (84145)
• Marion, Kansas
8 Jan 10
Our water is the city water. It is frequently tested. It tastes good to me and I find it to be satisfactory. We have reports from the Board of Public Utilities about it probably four times a year. Other people feel like it is too mineral tasting, but I think it makes for strong bones.
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@writersedge (22579)
• United States
8 Jan 10
Sounds like they're taking good care of you. Our nearest city has water that tastes like chlorine pool water. Not sure when it's tested. Funny thing that many other places have had "boil water" orders, but they haven't. I hope it's bested often. Of course with that much chlorine, should kill anything, maybe even people.
@Fulltank (2896)
• Philippines
8 Jan 10
Here in our place, there are two sources. The first one is a dam built in the the mountain ranges and had to be re-routed to reach the city. The second one is a spring nearby which was pump to a filtration and distillation plant.
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@writersedge (22579)
• United States
8 Jan 10
That's really good that you have two sources of water and that you know about them. Many people turn on their taps and don't know. Thanks for responding and take care.
@smileonstar (4014)
• United States
8 Jan 10
HI, I always get them at the water store... I dont really drink bottle water cuz they are the same where I get it. so why wasting money on something that you can get it cheap
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@writersedge (22579)
• United States
8 Jan 10
Not sure I understand. You get large containers at the bottle store so you don't have to buy some bottles or what? I'm lost.
@celticeagle (104019)
• Boise, Idaho
9 Jan 10
I get my water right out of the tap. I don't know about the plant or aquafer except that it is close and it obviously works. If I don't like the smell or taste of my water I get a filter and use it. I used to have a friend whose water was from a well and it was wonderful. Not too many of them left around here anymore.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
9 Jan 10
It's a good idea to know these things. After 911, some places have security in place so terrorists can't get to most cities water supplies. Not all wells are created equal. One well I had was fantastic. Then it went dry, the new one I dug, the disolved iron in it is horrible and we have one area where the disolved sulfer in it is horrible. Iron ruins clothes and appliances. Suffer doesn't do much except smell like rotten eggs and make everything else smell like it. Glad your experience with a well was a wonderful one. Thanks for responding and take care.
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@celticeagle (104019)
• Boise, Idaho
11 Jan 10
My experence with wells was many years ago before any 911 situation was an issue I am happy to say. Take care.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
11 Jan 10
Unless terrorists polute mountains, wells should be fine. It's aquafers for cities that are on full alert since 911. That's why it's a good idea for city people to know who is guarding their water supply. Iron and sulpher water come from minerals disolved in the water. If the water is going through mostly sand, it's very clean. If it's going through ore deposits, it's dirty. That's why when my well dried up, the next place we drilled had iron water, it's going through Potsdam soil (iron soil). People who live near our lakes tend to have sulpher water. We have lots of iron mines here. I don't know why sulpher water, but there must be layers of it near the water.
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