What's the difference between an attorney & a lawyer?

@maezee (32304)
United States
January 8, 2010 5:10pm CST
Is there any? Just curious. There's this guy (customer) who comes into my job and I know he's an attorney. But I honestly don't know the difference between an attorney and a lawyer, even though I plan on going to law school somewhere along the line.. I always thought they were the same; just different ways to say the same thing, but now I'm not so sure. Is there any difference between an attorney & a lawyer?
1 person likes this
5 responses
• United States
9 Jan 10
You are correct. They are both the same, just use two different names but they both handle court cases and such. Good for you going to law school, what a great profession to get into. Good luck!
@maezee (32304)
• United States
9 Jan 10
Thank ya! I know it's seriously expensive..But I'll figure that out as soon as I get to that point in my life.
• United States
9 Jan 10
Yes, it is expensive but you'll have a great career for the rest of your life! And probably get to retire early if you use your money wisely. And you will hear some really fascinating stories from all kinds of people! Sounds great to me and I hope you do this, I think it's an excellent choice! And geesh, everyone needs a lawyer at some time in their life, that's job security right there.
• United States
8 Jan 10
I thought attorney was a fancy name for a lawyer. Like physician and doctor. or teacher and educator. Hmmm? I hope i'm right?
• United States
9 Jan 10
good enough!
• United States
9 Jan 10
Hi Maezee, Just to ease your curiosity There is no difference in the two. A lawyer and an Attorney are exacly the same thing. The term Attorney is the proper title to call a lawyer. That's why when you go to an Attorney's office it will usually always say the name of the person followed by the phrase Attorney at Law. Some countries do use the term Lawyer more than others, but generally an Attorney is referred as a Lawyer because they have a degree in and practice in the study and interpretation of the Law.
@Janey1966 (24127)
• Carlisle, England
9 Jan 10
Attorney tends to be an American term, Lawyer is British as far as I know. The same applies to autopsy as opposed to post mortem...or homicide as opposed to murder. I could go on forever lol!
@olisaur (1932)
• United States
8 Jan 10
I've always wondered that, too, lol. I've never really been enlightened about how the judicial system works- for a long time I thought the jury was the "jewelry." w