Would you eat wild foods to cut down the cost of your food bill?

@writersedge (22579)
United States
January 17, 2010 2:02pm CST
If you go to youtube and type in winter wild food, you will get different videos that you can watch right now for this season. But there are videos for every season and to help you identify specific foods. Some videos are better than others. But if you watch about three videos, the picture of at least one of them should be good. Usually there is someone in every area that has some kind of wild food class. Cities have less of that (but not all) and usually somewhere nearby the cities, there are classes in the country or the suburbs. So would you go to a wild food class? Would you watch wild food videos? Do you already eat a wild food? Have you been taught how to identify trees or plants that you would know when you see them on a video?
1 person likes this
11 responses
• United States
17 Jan 10
Hi, Edge! I would love to do this! It's not only a money saver, it provides a challenge and fun!
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
How are you feeling cobra, any better? Check out some of the videos on youtube, there are some great ones. Also there may be someone who has classes where you are. Yeah it is a challenge and fun. You have the right attitude about it. Thanks and take care.
• United States
17 Jan 10
Thanks. My voice has returned as of today, and the noises in my chest are just rattles now instead of fighting mean dogs! Pneumonia is the pits!!! I loved what I saw on youtube!
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
I'm so glad you're doing better. So what did you see, what did you see?
@celticeagle (114184)
• Boise, Idaho
18 Jan 10
When I was married my husband's dad was a hunter and he would bring home a deer, elk, antelope, etc. we would cut it up and package it and then we shared in it for our endeavors. So we always had wild meat to eat. It was great and I really miss the flavor and nutrition. We also went to the mountains after the fires we had here and picked delicious mushrooms. Yum! Very good for us.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
18 Jan 10
What mushrooms were after the fires? Didn't you worry about gathering the wrong ones? Only puffballs do I know for sure and know I won't get poisoned. My Father and Uncle used to hunt deer and rabbit. I'm thinking about wild turkey in the near future. There were two one year, that wasn't enough to go hunting. Them 8 that I saw. Getting tempting. But now it's normal to see 10, 12, and 20 quite often. So before they get to the point where I'm hitting them with a car because they can't cross in time and splat doesn't make for very good food, I might hunt them. I'll have to look into it.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (114184)
• Boise, Idaho
19 Jan 10
I have several books with very good pictures. Also have friends in the area who have been doing it for many years. I have picked some that were huge. The Cherelles are expensive and the restaurants buy them by the pound. They are the ones that flurish after a fire. Are delicious too!
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
19 Jan 10
Great! Sounds like you're really positioned to take advantage of some great wild-fooding. Hope you're able to get many great tasting chanterels. There's a website with some wonderful pictures of them and all kinds of neat stuff. Thanks for responding and take care.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60050)
• United States
17 Jan 10
didn't you say you were trying to get together a class on gathering? I'm happy to pick up cans walking around
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
For soap plants, I was interested in getting a class together. I'd like to someday have a bunch of gatherers get together, forage and put on a meal for people. That's another goal. I have all kinds of ideas and goals, but who knows if they'll ever happen. Thanks and take care.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60050)
• United States
17 Jan 10
we used to have a guy that would do classes on wild food, but with my bad feet and my food allergies, I couldn't do it now - when I was much much younger I would go and pick wild onions - they taste really good in thing - salad and soups and the flowers floating on top of the soup was really pretty
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
Wild onions sound sooo good. We have wild leaks here, when we can find them. Between the people that over pick them and the people who bulldoze them over and build houses where they used to be, getting to be really rare to find now.
17 Jan 10
Here in the UK there is a TV cookery show where the presenter often goes out foraging for wild food and I find it fascinating. I admire those people who are confident enough to go out collecing wild berries, leaves and mushrooms to cook later. I just wouldn't have complete faith in my own judgement when it comes to whether something would be safe or not to eat, even having watched the show or videos on you tube.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
Yeah, I went to classes, but not for mushrooms. I wouldn't have faith in mushroom collecting either. Some things anyone can collect and eat though. Like 99% of people know a dandelion when they see one. Not very many people could mess that up. So what's the name of the presenter in the UK? Some of the people on youtube were from the UK.
17 Jan 10
The presenter is a bloke called Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and has his own program on mainstream TV called River Cottage.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
That sounds cool. That's not the guy I saw on youtube. Seems there are many people in the UK and the States into wild food.
@maximax8 (27048)
17 Jan 10
I don't think that I would be able to eat wild foods in order to cut down my food bill. On television there was a program about a family that went to live with the 'Green Community' in Wales. One of the things they did was go out collecting wild foods. It was amazing all they managed to get. One of the people living there explained they could make their own goods like shampoo. I don't know the names of all trees but I like trees. I would only be able to eat in the summer if I ate wild foods I think. I love strawberries.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
In the USA, we have a lot of soap plants. Different ones in different areas. In my area, it's bouncing bet, also called soapwort. But other places have yuccas and so on. Most people collect food in the spring, summer and fall. Berrries are often the first plants that people collect, and they're quite happy to do so. Wild strawberries have way more taste than tame store bought, esp. in the USA where the tame ones are bred for shelf-life and taste almost like wet cardboard now. But there are some things that people usually don't collect unless it's winter. Also one video had a good point, if you're lost or your car breaks down or you're stranded because a plane has to make an emergency landing in winter, it might be a good idea to know some edible trees. The only trees we have that are all that poisonous are white or swamp sumac and cedar. The red sumacs, the red parts aren't poisonous. Pines, spruces, and hemlock trees aren't poisonous (hemlock plants or swamp hemlock plants are).
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
I think I would love that TV show about people who were collecting wild foods after moving to a green community in wales. Would love to do the same here.
• United States
18 Jan 10
I think I would have a hard time trusting the food to be safe. It is an interesting idea though and if there were classes I could take to have someone who knows how to do it then I think it is a great idea. My family used to go into the mountains and get pine nuts. I love them but I never learned how to get them so now I buy them and they are a small fortune! Great idea!
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
19 Jan 10
When the pine cones fall off the tree, I put them on a cookie sheet with aluminium foil on it and put my electric oven on 220. Eventually, some pine cone seeds fall out and they taste roasted. Delicious. Not sure how your family did it, but that's what I've been doing. Have you checked youtube or done a search? There might be other advice for you. If you have a cooperative extention, college, or Native Americans nearby, you might be able to get classes through any of them.
@cutepenguin (6458)
• Canada
18 Jan 10
We pick wild berries and freeze them. we use them in baking and in smoothies. I hadn't ever really thought about other wild food.
1 person likes this
• United States
18 Jan 10
I used to have a survivalist book and it was full of wildfoods,needless to say I lost that book and it is so ironic that I stumbled upon this discussion because I was just thinking about wild foods myself. Yes If I could find wild foods today I would get my eco friendly bag and go gather food.I will be watching youtube thanks so much buddy for that tip. I have eaten wild foods and I really do enjoy them they can be very tasty and enjoyable. People have ruined their taste buds by eating all these processed and fast foods. If people ate more wild foods we would have less obesity in the world.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
18 Jan 10
Exactly! There is a wonderful youtube from UK about chess nuts. They look like green tennis balls until you take them apart. That one is cool. Winter Edible Part 1 and part 2 as well as Winter Wild Edibles were interesting. Susun Weed's interview Part 2 was really cool, not so much about identifying wild foods, but letting plants tell you what medicine they are. If you get another book, try, "Peterson's Guide to Wild Edibles" that's a great one. My instructor said to try to have 3 books when IDing something for the first time. I have a local one, Adirondack, and a regional one. So I have my 3. You may want to check out my answers to others on this post for more tips. Thanks for responding and take care.
@rhino5 (32)
• United States
17 Jan 10
I would do this, But making sure the wild food was safe to eat and still good for the body. Also wild foods are mostly good for you unlike the food at local walmarts and resteraunts.
1 person likes this
@marguicha (80332)
• Chile
17 Jan 10
I would love to learn about wild food, not only as a food bill saver, but as more food to add to my cooking knowledge. When I went to Mexico I was very interested on how mexicans eat zucchinni flowers. I only eat zucchinnis, but I used to eat them only when they were cooked and now I know a lot of ways to prepare them raw. That goes for a lot of food and each this I learn helps me eat better. I have a lot of plants I eay in my garden that were not there before. I would be happy if someone taught me to pick non poisonous wild mushrooms. Happy posting!
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
17 Jan 10
Yeah, I'd like to learn how to find and prepare wild mushrooms, too. Not many people do that in this area. I just finished watching a youtube video about finding and preparing wild chestnuts. That was cool. Yeah, you can only eat so many of those zuchini flowers or you won't have any little chinis. There are hundreds of zuke recipes. I have only had cake, bread and casseroles. I'd like to try brownies and pickles. Maybe you'll find some people to take those classes from in your area. Try Cooperative extensions, colleges, and schools, also some tour guide people sometimes do wild food tours. You may be able to find some. In the meantime, wintertime we can watch some videos. Take care and have fun in your garden and maybe even in a class soon.
• Jakarta, Indonesia
18 Jan 10
I dont tink so
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
18 Jan 10
Hi New Person. How are you? Best to put at least 4 sentences in a responce. So, why would you not eat wild foods?