Why does you go with "are", and I is not compatible with "is"? :)

@vandana7 (62278)
India
January 29, 2010 1:06am CST
If you are going to movies, why I is not going there? Got it? :) And when do we use the word "the", or "a". I have plenty of such doubts in English. I really want to improve my communication skills. Any help in these doubts would be welcome. :)
6 responses
@ElicBxn (60762)
• United States
29 Jan 10
The is the definite article, means a specific object - a is more of a generic article, meaning a one of many. At most people's houses it would be "THE cat had a mouse" at my house "A cat had a mouse". Instead on the one and only cat, one of my many cats had a mouse. "am" is a form of "be" as a verb am v. First person singular present indicative of "be." is v. Third person singular present indicative of be. Also, while we have lost the second person "thee" and you have to consider "you" as a plural even when you use it as a singular second person. "I am..." "You are.." "He is..." (1st, 2nd & 3rd person singular) "We are..." "You are..." "They are..." plural "It" is considered singular "it is the right time..." for example I strongly recommend dictionaries online to check meanings, I'm a native English speaker and I use them!
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (62278)
• India
30 Jan 10
Wow, that is so simple now! I got it. By the way, is there any reason the articles disappear? For example, I have not added the in between for and example. I know this is laughable. :) But my grammar is terrible! Whatever little command I have is because of the English movies, and story books. :) So it is natural for me to question whether that highlighted the should be there or not, and if so, should it be there before story books as well? If not, why not. :) I have similar doubts on I will, and I'll, I am, I'm, don't and dont. he he. When do we spell them like that? May be I should be starting another discussion to get those things right. :) Hope you will be able to clarify on the doubt that I've mentioned here (here again I have put the apostrophe instinctively - I am not sure it is right). So it is always a shot in the dark as far as I am concerned. :)
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@ElicBxn (60762)
• United States
30 Jan 10
apostrophes have 2 usages... to abbreviate and to make a possessive... you had it right with the "I will" to "I'll" and "I'm" "Don't" is for "do not" "can't" is for "can not" "isn't" is for "is not". "Not" and "will" are two of the main words that are brought together, but "have" is going that way too "I've" Now, I'll spell a word that isn't correct - yet anyway - but since I say it, why can't I use it? "Shouldn't've" is the word - of course its for "should not have" "Won't" is for "would not" because English can just be contrary... Now, the British drop articles - and I don't know why - but it is a difference between the way American English and British English are evolving. In the States we would never say "go to hospital" but they do that all the time in Britain. The British also spell a lot of words the "French" way, as in "colour" "humour." Of course the English language will steal vocabulary from any land so you find a lot of strange spellings, and the closer you get to a place where the language isn't English (or they remain proud of their non-English roots) you find odd spellings - mostly French. New Orleans was settled by the French and you see a lot of French or French "knock off" coming out of the area. The Cajuns and the Creoles are especially proud of their French roots. And in Canada, Quebec isn't just proud of their French roots, they still actually speak the language there. In fact, the main places in the Western Hemisphere they are still speaking French are in Quebec, Haiti, the French West Indies... Probably a few other pocket colonies doing it, but probably not as stubbornly... I have a shirt that says: English doesn't borrow from other languages, English follows other languages down dark alleys, knocks them over and goes through their pockets for loose grammar.
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@vandana7 (62278)
• India
30 Jan 10
That was really amusing. Thanks for such a detailed response ElicBxn. It has given me a lot of confidence about my articles and "the"s, and "a"s. :) Hopefully, I will be able to follow the first person, second person and third person bit as well. I am a bit slow in catching up. :) But I think with such lucid explanation, this time it will stick. :)
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@vijayanths (7878)
• India
29 Jan 10
vandana I am also equally poor in my Grammar if not poorer. Let me explain you with whatever little knowledge I have on the subject. Let God save English from 2 v's (vijayanths and vandana) The suitable verb for I is am. Similarly for you it is are. Your question should be "why do you go---" . Only third person singular will have this s addition, I mean walks, sings, does etc.. If you are one of the many mylotters I can say a mylotter by name vandana is a good person. If you are the only person who I like most here, then I can say vandana is the only mylotter who I like most There is only one Sun, so let us say The Sun.... I have too many doubts in preposition especially( will you correct me now?
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@vandana7 (62278)
• India
29 Jan 10
Thanks vijayanths for the effort. :) I make it a point to go to the discussions of native English speaking friends to learn such things, at times I get confused about such things. I can't possibly ask them all the time, as it would dampen their jokes. But I wish there was a way I could learn. Yes, I understood some. I am confused about that third person singular stuff that you've written. What does it mean?
• India
29 Jan 10
You write excellent English and I have a doubt whether you are just kidding me with this discussion. Anyways let me seriously explain what I know now. I, we - first person: I first person singular. We- first person plural. You- 2nd person -both singular and plural same you. He, she, it- 3rd person -singular -so we say he sings, she dances, it runs etc..
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@vandana7 (62278)
• India
29 Jan 10
I dont think so. :) Till fifth standard, I studied in Hindi medium school, and thereafter I went to a convent. I missed the basics of grammar, and that will always be an area where I will not be sure of myself. So I am not kidding you. :) I thought by now you would have known when I was serious and when I was not. :) And very very honest - I could do with more explanation on this! "I, we - first person: I first person singular. We- first person plural. You- 2nd person -both singular and plural same you. He, she, it- 3rd person -singular -so we say he sings, she dances, it runs etc.. "
@bhanusb (5709)
• India
29 Jan 10
There are many peculiarities in English language. Perhaps in every language. In our Bangla (Bengali language) there is a joke ilke this: B U T But, C U T Cut. What wrong with P U T Put. But the pronunciation is Poot. Vandana don't make your brain puzzled.
@vandana7 (62278)
• India
31 Jan 10
Yeah, I remember criketer and commentator Geoffrey Boycott. Wonder how that old chap is. :) Thanks for putting my mind at ease. :) Have a nice day.
@yugasini (12816)
• Anantapur, India
29 Jan 10
hi vandana, i know very well that you know good English,why you have started this discussion in mylot,i think you may not find any subject to raise a discussion,actully i does not know using word the and a ,what ever comming to my mind i will post it to mylot,i will not see the mistakes and language,i know that mylot friends will accept all my grammer and knowledge mistakes,some of my friends may inform me that where i have commit mistakes,have a nice day
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@vandana7 (62278)
• India
30 Jan 10
Hi yugasini, in the seven months that I've known you, I have seen dramatic changes in your language and expressions. Coming to your first sentence, I'm afraid that is not true at all. Up until fifth standard, I was in Hindi medium school. By the time most of the grammar was already covered in schools at this end. Moreover, whatever was being taught didn't really enter my brain, because remember I was from Hindi medium, and therefore, I was just getting into groove. When rest of my friends were reading Nancy Drew, I was reading Jack and the Bean Stalk. :) That bad. This is the reason I am not confident about my command over the language. It is a different issue that I became a voracious reader afterwards. But it feels like having built this building without proper foundation. Get what I mean. :)
@Buchi_bulla (8299)
• India
29 Jan 10
There is a wonderful Grammar Book called Wren and Martin from which my father learnt English grammar, I learnt, my children learnt and now my grand daughter is learning. It is very easily explained in that book. All your doubts about grammar will be explained with examples.
@vandana7 (62278)
• India
29 Jan 10
Yeah Buchi_bulla, I had mine for a long time! :) But the problem is my primary education (till fifth standard) was in Hindi medium. Therefore my foundation is rather weak. :) I am never confident about my command over this language. :) And there are times when I read other people comments and wonder is that correct usage? :) And I really struggle when I have to write something. :) So I decided to get some simpler explanations. :) Lamb has done a good job above about the and a.
@allknowing (61498)
• India
29 Jan 10
It is as complicated as wanting to know why 'a' comes before 'b' and 'z' last in the alphabets list. You will notice that there is no set pattern and one can get the the hang of it by constantly speaking the language, and writing it.
@vandana7 (62278)
• India
29 Jan 10
Yes allknowing. I do need to practice writing and speaking. :) That is how I came this far. :) But after so many years, I am still uncomfortable about somethings. :) Thanks for guidance. :)
@vandana7 (62278)
• India
29 Jan 10
Lamb that surely can't be the reason!
@vandana7 (62278)
• India
29 Jan 10
Lamb forgot to add LOL.