Military recruitment in high schools

United States
February 9, 2010 10:53am CST
Do you think it is okay for the military to be doing recruitment in high schools? I think this is a little over the line. Half of the kids in high school are not quite sure what they want to do with their lives. I don't know if it is right for the military to come into a school and say come and join us, we will take care of you and take care of you family. But then again I would be hyprocrytical saying it would be okay for colleges and other carrer recruitment in highschools also. So I guess I am kind of in between on this subject. What do you think?
1 person likes this
12 responses
@MrKennedy (1994)
9 Feb 10
I personally think it is wrong, because at that age, kids usually don't have the slightest idea of what they want to do with their life and what career path to follow. It all seems like cunning propaganda to me, lure in recruits whilst they are young with all the talk about money, bonuses and such, yet hide the details about the actual conflict that takes place
1 person likes this
• Philippines
10 Feb 10
hide the details such as they could die out there or do some black ops that the media is not completely aware about and not to mention their mental capability to handle the killings and witnessing war itself. they should just look for those who are in college or graduating, unless they believe they couldn't persuade college people.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
9 Feb 10
My husband's family has been in the military since they got to these shores back in the 1700s. So when the military recruiters came, he wanted to hear what each one had to say and he chose the Air Force. His sister chose the Army. His other brothers and sisters chose regular work or to get married. My husband wanted all the military had to offer without actually going out and shooting anyone. He had a great career for 20 years. His sister wanted radio operations. Both got what they wanted. She only stayed in for a few years. They both received tons of training that worked well for them when they left the military. My Dad's family goes into the military in times of war. Otherwise, they're not crazy about it. The army came to my school, but no other branch. I would have liked the Coast Guard, but they never came. The army gave me the ASVAB test and I found out what I was good at and what I was not good at. They offered fixing jeeps. There is no way I would fix jeeps. But the ASVAB was useful. Had they offered office work, maybe I would have gone. If the Air Force had come and offered medical technology, I might have gone. Coast Guard or Navy, if they had come and offered search and rescue, I would have gone. I think if you have colleges there, you should also have the military, but you should have all the branches of the military. Not just one branch. Most students are 18 when they are in the 12th grade. They are about to graduate and need to decide what to do when they get out of school. College is an option, a job is an option, and the military is an option. Schools need to help students see all the options available. Denying 17 and 18 year olds the opportunity to see an option or choose something just because it would not be a choice some people would make is not right. Regular job recruiters, colleges, and military should all present what they have to offer. There is also paramilitary which would be police and correction officers. They also should present to them. Esp. since there are age limits on the military, police in many states and correction officers in some states. If a student doesn't think about it, then by the time the person decides he or she wanted to be a Deputy Sheriff, it might be too late or become a military radiologist. I've heard some people say they wish different things had been presented in their high school. By the time they realized they wanted to be a forest ranger (also like police, paramilitary), they were too old. I think that at 18, they can try a regular job, think about some of the other choices they were presented with, and maybe decide on another one that they really want before the time limit is up. Also, early 30s is not a good time for many people to try boot camp. A lot of health problems show up in the 30s. But after 4 years of track and field, the perfict time to go. My husband did track, field, and farming. He laughed at the whining whimps and felt sorry for people that decided later to go into the military. A person needs to be fit to manage boot camp. He was already getting up at 6 for the farming, already running, etc. He had decided on the military way before they came. If you wait until 18, then you need to make up for all the track, field, and other fitness that you need. My cousin runs a dojo and he has tons of people in their teens that want to do military or paramilitary jobs. They're doing martial arts now. Just because it's not a choice I would make, I wouldn't stop someone else from making it and I certainly am reaping the benefits of my husband's military career.
@abenitez (501)
• United States
9 Feb 10
I think it is just a tough reality. There practices can change because all they do is talk about the money you can make and how they take care of you. What they dont talk about is the reality of being in the military. But, they have to let them recruit in high schools since they let colleges and companies do the same.
• United States
10 Feb 10
Yes that is what I was thinking it is just like any other recruitment and then our kids get to make the choice from there.
@GardenGerty (96659)
• Marion, Kansas
21 Feb 10
I think it is fine to have recruiters come to the school. I had all kinds of college recruiters come to me, and I still had to make my own choice. My son aced the Navy exam but then said he was not interested. It is an option that gets an income, and is a transition, and it teaches discipline. There is health care, and housing. There is training and travel. Yes, there is war. In many big cities there is war on the streets and you do not know who the enemy is. I liked writersedge post, it was very complete.
@dorannmwin (36698)
• United States
12 Feb 10
I feel that it is perfectly acceptable for the military to recruit to high school students. I believe that these young adults should be presented with all of the different opportunities that they could face after high school. There are constantly colleges that are recruiting to high school students, but in all honesty that is only one of the different avenues that a person can choose to take after high school. By allowing military to recruit in the high schools, they are showing another option that people have after high school.
• India
10 Feb 10
I justified the military recruitment at this stage we can mould the young mind easily . We can utilize fresh mind and enthusiasm for our nation. As passing of time they can understand the importance of military rquirement and deep knowledge of the military.
• Philippines
10 Feb 10
It is fine I guess. There is nothing really wrong with it, but it should not be mandatory thou. Sometimes its just better to introduce that to let people search for their careers, and besides, the military imposes very good trainings which molds the children to be more disciplined in life, plus it develops a person holistically.
• Canada
10 Feb 10
i think its inappropriate to have military recruits in high schools, if its something that a young teenager wants to pursue then that should be on their own initative. As a mother myself, i wouldnt want anyone influencing my son to go into the army. now if he comes to me one day wanting to join then thats a different story.
• Philippines
10 Feb 10
Hello natnick, i thought there's already a program for highschool and college which regards to military training, and that is the ROTC? i know that in my country only a few schools still has rotc but the rest had become a civilian civil service or something. maybe it still has something to do with the current wars in other countries.
@grammasnook (1877)
• United States
9 Feb 10
As parents we fear the military talking to our children after all they are trying to take them away from us. That being said it is more important to explain to your children that you only think about joining the military for one reason. My Oldest son and my oldest daughter came home talking about they wanted to enlist. My response was I will support you if you do it for all the right reasons. That reason is that you are willing to die for your country. As for the schooling and the perks heck you can get help all over the place they are not the only ones that offer college.
@weasel81 (2502)
• Australia
9 Feb 10
it all falls down to what the indviduals wants, but they would have some idea if they want to go in to the millitary when they leave school. there is a number of local people that have gone in to the military after school, one of th guys i that i am friends with was in the army reserves when we were in the final yr of school. i did hear something out here in australia, of them making the kids take a yrs break before going to uni. which i think is bad, cause that when people get new careers and decide to do something else with their life.
• Estonia
9 Feb 10
Well, I don't know, how is the situation at your schools. I mean, I don't how actively does military perform recruitment there. In our school is the following situation: some military personnel from different military schools visit us every year and perform a lecture, where they explain the opportunities we have in case we want to choose military career. They introduce these military schools to us and inform about choice of specialties you can learn there. Then we also have another lecture where some military personnel from the recruitment office explain us the process of mandatory enlistment. It is a period of 11 months during which young men receive a basic military training. I think that these lectures are quite useful, because some young men just don't know what to do after school. They can choose serving our country instead of becoming thieves or drunkards, and they can also earn a decent amount of money for their efforts. These lectures are not aggressive, so I think it's okay to have such lectures. But I repeat, I don't know, how aggressive are lectures at your schools.