Egg omelets are made of. Can you give me an omelet recipe?

Turkey
February 10, 2010 8:53am CST
Breakfast is usually eaten in omelets. Omelets in the egg. Do you know the recipe omelet?
1 person likes this
2 responses
@owlwings (37883)
• Cambridge, England
10 Feb 10
An omelet is one of the easiest things to make. First you need a good, well seasoned preferably heavy pan with rounded edges and a flat bottom. The edges should be rounded so that the omelette can be easily slipped from the pan when done. This pan should ONLY ever be used for omelettes and should never be washed. Put a knob of butter in the pan and heat until the butter stops foaming. Do not let it turn brown. Next, break one or more eggs into a bowl and add one tablespoon (15ml) of water per egg. Add a pinch of salt and some freshly ground pepper to taste. A pinch of mixed dried herbs may be added, if liked. Mix the eggs with a fork until the yolks and whites are roughly blended. Pour the mixture (or part of it, depending on the size of the pan and the number of omelettes required) into the pan. It should immediately begin to form a skin at the bottom. With the fork (or a spatula), gently lift the skin around the edge and tip the pan so that the liquid egg can flow under it. Continue to do this until most of the liquid egg is used and cook until the top is still moist but not runny. The omelette should now be loose in the pan and will move when the pan is shaken. With a spatula, lift the edge of the omelette nearest the handle and fold it over the other half, so that you have a semicircle. Slide the omelette out of the pan and onto the plate. Serve immediately. Repeat the above as necessary. If you want a filled omelette, place the filling on the half of the omelette which is furthest from the handle before folding the other half over it.
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@owlwings (37883)
• Cambridge, England
10 Feb 10
To clean the pan after use, sprinkle a little salt in it and wipe round with kitchen paper. A good omelette pan is made of cast iron and should be seasoned before use by covering the inside with a thin coating of a good high temperature oil and heating until the oil smokes. Allow to cool and wipe dry with kitchen paper or a dry cloth. The longer it is used in this way, the more non-stick it becomes. If necessary, it may be lightly rinsed with clean water (never, ever use soap or detergent or it will have to be re-seasoned all over again) from time to time but only in order to remove any particles of food that have clung to it. This should really never be necessary.
• United States
13 Feb 10
very intersting owlwings on how to clean the pan. I haven't had an iron pan since I was a teenager.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (37883)
• Cambridge, England
13 Feb 10
The good thing about a properly seasoned iron pan is that you can use metal tools with it. If you use metal tools with one of the modern non-stick coatings, you are bound to damage it. A cast iron pan spreads and evens out the heat much better than a lighter aluminium pan, too. The disadvantages are that a cast iron pan is heavier and that the handle tends to get hot (but not so hot that you cannot use a cloth when handling it).
• United States
13 Feb 10
Usually my husband just mixes up 3-4 eggs in a bowl til smooth & a dash of milk + salt & pepper. Spray the pan with Pam or the alike. He usually leaves it in the pan til it is almost cooked then adds cheese, sausage (or any lefover meats or lunch meat) & canned mushrooms let cook til the cheese is melted and serves.