How is Reconciliation advancing Obama's goal of "bipartisanship?"

@Rollo1 (16686)
Boston, Massachusetts
February 22, 2010 9:21am CST
Obama has often said that he wants a bipartisan health care bill. The health care summit he has called for with Democrats and Republicans is supposedly so that he may listen to Republican ideas on health care reform. Yet, Obama has set forth his own plan AHEAD of this summit. Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi have announced their intention of passing the health care bill they have constructed using reconciliation - a process meant to be used to pass budget proposals - AHEAD of the health care summit and passing the bill without any Republican votes and without many votes from their own party? Why does the president speak of bipartisanship when both he and some members of Congress are determined to pass a health care bill that does not have the required majority support either in Congress or amongst the American people? Now, imagine that this is not a health care bill we are discussing, but some other legislation to which you are vehemently opposed. Imagine that the majority of Americans feel as you do, and do not support the passage of this legislation. Now imagine that despite these facts, the President and Congress are conspiring to use any technical loophole they can to pass a law that you and a majority of Americans oppose. Do you still think it's a good idea for the government to move in opposition to the will of the people? "Bush did it" will not be considered a proper response unless you can prove A. it was done in a move unrelated to the budget; B. that you approved of Bush doing it; and C. two wrongs make a right.
1 person likes this
2 responses
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
22 Feb 10
It is not about passing a Health Care Bill, it is telling the US people we will do what we want and you can't stop us. If you remember during the Bush Administration the Democrat minority in the Senate stressed the need for 60 votes to approve even presidential appointments and the Republican better never use the "nuclear option" (passing bills with 51 votes). If health care is such an important issue why could the Democrats not pass it. They had a large majority in the house, filibuster proof Senate and a Democrat President in the White House, nothing the Republicans can do about it so why did it not pass?
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@Rollo1 (16686)
• Boston, Massachusetts
22 Feb 10
It's a definite power play. They did mean to waltz in and announce their plans and have it all go very smoothly. It didn't work that way because the public got wise to their plans and protested. At that point, the moderate Democrats who were actually listening to their constituents couldn't go along. It is exactly because the health care bills proposed thus far go places the American public don't want to go and the agenda of the president is so far left, that they couldn't get the support. Democrat doesn't automatically mean "far left". Those moderate Democrats who stood up in opposition should be applauded for choosing conscience and duty over Party.
• United States
22 Feb 10
Amen to that Rollo :)
1 person likes this
@gewcew23 (8011)
• United States
22 Feb 10
Obama's version of bipartisanship is for any opposition to give up. So in away wanting to uses reconciliation does not violate his desire to be post partisan. I Obama's eye reconciliation is just forcing the opposition to do want they were suppose to do in the first place, grab their ankles and take it!
1 person likes this
@Rollo1 (16686)
• Boston, Massachusetts
22 Feb 10
Funny, I was watching the news a while ago and I said pretty much the same thing. Bipartisan means "we gave the Republicans the chance to change their minds and agree to everything we want and they wouldn't". Bipartisan means either you agree with them or they are going to just do it without you. They intend to do it and announced that they intend to do it, whether the people will it to be so or not. They just don't care. I hope someday, they will reap their rewards with a good old fashioned retirement from elected office.