Cheney Confesses to War Crimes!

@anniepa (27236)
United States
February 26, 2010 3:00pm CST
"I was a big supporter of waterboarding," boasted Cheney. That's right, he said it on ABC News recently. To many that's a confession to war crimes and should be prosecuted as such. Any comments? Annie
3 people like this
11 responses
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
27 Feb 10
Think he would be a big supporter if he had it done to him? I can't believe he was such an idiot to announce it like that!
2 people like this
@anniepa (27236)
• United States
27 Feb 10
Zeph, I'm glad you stopped by to weigh in on this! I'm feeling rather frustrated because it seems I'm WAY in the minority here, everyone else seems to have no problem whatsoever with it. Water-boarding is a CRIME for which our government has prosecuted several people through the years. Apparently since we'd all prefer to be water-boarded rather than have our heads chopped off that makes it OK! Annie
1 person likes this
@piasabird (1737)
• United States
27 Feb 10
Try again! He didn't confess to committing any war crimes. He said he supports it. You can support the right to choose but that doesn't mean that you had an abortion.
1 person likes this
@jb78000 (15173)
2 Mar 10
piasa - you are actually right. unless he said at some point he had allowed waterboarding to go ahead or been involved then all he is doing is stating his opinion, nasty as it is.
@jb78000 (15173)
2 Mar 10
actually no it isn't. if he said he had been involved in any way, or turned a blind eye, then it would be but that statement is just saying he approves of a practice classed as torture. you could equally say i think suspected terrorists should get their fingernails pulled out but unless you are involved that just means you have, a rather nasty, opinion on torture. by the way i think you are going to get six million responses saying waterboarding isn't torture but since it is classed as such under us and international law and everybody with experience in human rights says it is i think i'll go with them.
2 people like this
• Spain
2 Mar 10
Agreed, Judith. Whether you think it's torture or not - and I do - the fact remains that it is against the law. And no nation who considers itself a respected player on the world's stage should condone anything illegal.
1 person likes this
@matersfish (6311)
• United States
27 Feb 10
Go Cheney! I heard they used bottled water in the enhanced interrogations. So, to me, that makes them humanitarians.
1 person likes this
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
1 Mar 10
LOL! Go Maters, GO! I just dropped in to support those who frankly find water-boarding & such just fine, if it stops terrorist plots. Oh, & it does work. It's not torture, & it works. Grow up, Kool-ade drinkers. This is NOT an "ouchless" world! I promise you, if you knew terrorists were about to nuke the snot out of your home, & you had a person who could tell you when & where this was planned, you'd be holding the (censored) so-&-so down yourself & yelling "Pass me the water!" Yeesh. "Torture." Hmph. Ask anyone who's really been tortured if they agree that water-boarding is the same. If they say they do, I'm guessing they were tortured 'til they lost their minds. But frankly, the only one I've ever heard of that said that at all was McCain, who is always going to come down on the mushy middle, PC side. The man's a political marshmallow. As much as I hated to have to vote for him, though, he still wouldn't have been a full-bore thuggish Socialist, such as Obummerama is, had he had the stones to fight to win. I am sooo ready for the next election! Maggiepie "WHERE'S THE real BIRTH CERTIFICATE?"
@jb78000 (15173)
2 Mar 10
yay, matersfish has a crew too . unfortunately waterboarding under international and us law is classed as torture. there is a reason for this, although the views of people who have never been tortured,and never been at risk of being tortured and clearly know more than experts on human rights, or anybody else really, should of course be given way more consideration than international law. incidentally waterboarding was introduced by the spanish inquisition, but i imagine simply to allow the tortuees a little break.
• United States
2 Mar 10
Yeah, everybody's all for judging the sh1t out of everybody else when their azzes are safe in whatever little pillowy world they exist in. Take that away, it's surprising how attitudes change. Rightfully so? I think so. Reality is a bizznitch. No need for a long rant about how ridiculous and obviously wagon-ridingly political people are being. Suffice it to say that this guy will never turn terrorists into VICTIMS. What's next? A nationwide protest against our prisons because murderers, pedo scum and rapists are being raped and how that's just "wrong"? Nah, I suspect nobody cares enough to care about it unless it's brought to their attention daily and they're told who the victim should be in the scenario. But GITMO... JB, a "crew" would be if Maggie started going to your discussions where I posted and telling you a thing or few about a thing or few. Sometimes you seem okay. Most times you seem to be out of your clock.
@hofferp (4739)
• United States
28 Feb 10
I'm a supporter of waterboarding and any other enhanced interrogation technique that will keep my family safe.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27236)
• United States
28 Feb 10
That would be well and good except that TORTURE DOESN'T WORK! Annie
@jb78000 (15173)
2 Mar 10
even if it did the line has to be drawn somewhere. you stop at torture unless you want to be worse than the nastiest regimes we know. there is no excuse for torture under any circumstances whatsoever - and saying you don't think a practice is torture does not mean it actually isn't, if there is any question you do not do it.
• United States
26 Feb 10
You know me annie...I really don't like Cheney. I dislike most politicans...and am ticked off as hell at just about all of them right now....but only a few scare me. Cheney was one of them. I was glad to see him go. He is the "darth vader" of politics. I think there is a lot of bad things that he did that we don't know about...probly making "water boarding" looking like child's play. As for waterboarding...well to be honest I am a little confused on this one. Is it torture? I know it is not comfortable...not even pleasant..probly not fun at all...but is it really torture? I am still out on that one. I am not convienced it is really torture. As for Cheney...well it depends on how he actually worded it. Did he say he "ordered" the water boarding done? Or that he personally told the army they could do it? Is there something with his name on it that says he was the one that got to make that decision? Is anyone saying he was the one who made that decision? Just because you support or approve of something does not mean you are the one responsible for it being done or even have the power to make it happen. The real question is who got to make that decision. I would guess..but don't hold me to it..that it was Bush. Which would mean that HE would be the one responsible and not Cheney sence he was the one with the acutal power to make the decision. As for prosecution...don't hold your breath. Our government will never let ANY president get prosecuted on a world stage. They pardoned Nixon and that was just for a crime committed in this country. Do you honestly think our government will EVER turn a current or even former president over to the United Nations to be tried on war crimes? Heck NO. Hell will freeze over first.
1 person likes this
@TTCCWW (579)
• United States
27 Feb 10
Waterboarding is classified by our military and our state department as toture and that is constitutionally illegal. The last administration found themselves not looking at history when they made these decission's. They got around future prosecutions by having their lawyers tell them that it was alright to do it. Rumsfield won't traval abroad because he is afraid of prosecution for war crimes. When you give up freedoms for security, you have neither. Every organization around the world that deals with criminals and terroist will tell you that no torture works what does work, every time, is taking them out of their element and befriending them. They becamoe lonly and are soon spilling everything they know to someone acting as a friend. They got all kinds of information out of Sadam Hussain and never laid a hand on him. The information you get when you torture is almost always wrong. Why is it that this generation cannot follow the rules or thinks that they should be above them. We fought all the previous wars that were huge in comparrison to this one and our parents and grandparents were able to follow the rules. I think that when we do this we spit on the generations that came before us and fought for our freedoms.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27236)
• United States
27 Feb 10
Cheney has admitted on several occasions to having authorized and approved water-boarding and "enhanced interrogations methods". Annie http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/Story?id=6464697&page=1
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
26 Feb 10
Well Annie your title is a blatant lie. Are you aware that the majority in this country support waterboarding terrorists? Does that mean we are a nation of war criminals? First off I don't even consider waterboarding a crime, especially when used against terrorists who aren't covered by the U.S. Constitution or the Geneva Convention. Regardless, you have to actually COMMIT a crime to be guilty of a crime. There are people in this country, heck even a couple here on mylot, that have spoken out in support of terrorists. That doesn't make said morons war criminals, just idiots.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27236)
• United States
27 Feb 10
It IS a crime whether you think it should be or not. We prosecuted people for it decades ago. Annie
@Latrivia (2889)
• United States
1 Mar 10
Supporting "enhanced interrogation techniques" isn't illegal per se. This doesn't sound like he's admitting to a war crime, so much as admitting to liking the idea of water boarding. A lot of people support water boarding. Now if he ordered water boarding, that's another matter. They would actually need to prove he was somehow involved in the torture to try him as a criminal. You can't just arrest a guy for liking the idea of water boarding.
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Feb 10
Doesn't waterboarding affect the victim psychologically rather than physically, and isn't it believed that there's no lasting effect? While I wouldn't want to experience any type of "torture," real or imagined, waterboarding just doesn't seem that severe a procedure to me, certainly not like having parts of your body cut off, being deprived of food and water, having electric probes used on a person, or having your skin or fingernails torn off, and who knows what other procedures might be used to exact information. Also, since there's no way Bush will ever be elected President again and Cheney doesn't seem to have any interest in the job, why give terrorist even a psychological victory by prosecuting Cheney?
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Feb 10
That is a good question, I would like to see these people held accountable for their actions. So many people like Cheney hide behind the presidency and do horrible things that we would denounce if some other government did this. But, we just kind of smile and say that it must be OK to do this because it was OUR government that did it.
1 person likes this
@Qaeyious (2362)
• United States
2 Mar 10
That's not torture. They were washing him.
• United States
2 Mar 10
@urbandekay (18312)
4 Mar 10
Being a supporter of a crime is not in and of itself a crime. I may support all manner of crimes but only if I take action, including inciting others to commit those crimes should I be prosecuted. Such is freedom of speech and belief. If Cheney took action then he should be punished and his punishment should be most severe, those afforded greater privileges by society deserve greater punishment when they err all the best urban