how do you pick your politicians?

@jb78000 (15178)
March 4, 2010 1:57am CST
does anybody else find it vaguely suspicious that the two most talked about and voted in politicians in us politics (palin and obama) are both reasonably attractive and in early middle age rather than decaying goblins? this confusion between celebtrities and politicians has not just been happening over there, in the uk the leader of the opposition has been playing up his relative youth with a very shiny, clearly airbrushed poster campaign featuring him, and no strategies whatsoever. so, would you be tempted to vote for somebody based more on their looks than their policies?
5 people like this
29 responses
@owlwings (38055)
• Cambridge, England
4 Mar 10
I tend to vote for my local representative, not for the 'party leader'. In the UK we don't get to directly choose the leader of our country: it depends which party gets into power and who they have chosen as their leader. Our elections are specifically to choose who will be our Member of Parliament (National or European). I therefore always try to choose the person who I feel: 1) Best demonstrates in his/her policies the values which seem to me to be most important. 2) Is most active and available to his/her constituents and therefore the most suitable candidate as a real and effective representative. 3) Whether or not I think that the leader of the party to which he/she is affiliated is worthy of leading the country (if the party even stands a chance of getting into power). Looks (if they are a factor at all) come way down my list of priorities. To a certain extent, whether someone looks trustworthy, smarmy, caring, doddery, too young or whatever might be a final deciding factor - and it's always good to put a face to a name - but the two points I mention above (approximately in that order) are how I decide who I will vote for.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (38055)
• Cambridge, England
4 Mar 10
I should add that I consider it my well-won right to vote and that I owe it to myself as a member of my community to cast my vote. Those who don't vote do not deserve representation.
1 person likes this
• Canada
5 Mar 10
Hello Owlwings. What if you knew for a fact that voting is fixed? Maybe youd think differently!! Im saying this because I know for a fact that its fixed. I was there, I saw it happen and I was escorted out the door and told that even if I told the whole world, nobody would believe me.......they were right!
@owlwings (38055)
• Cambridge, England
6 Mar 10
Magical, you may have evidence that it's fixed in your country. I don't see any evidence of any malpractice in ours (though the whole system is not truly 'representative').
• Canada
4 Mar 10
Happy to be Canadian - We're happy to be Canadian and dont you wonder why we smile so much? haha
Mmmm very interesting subject. Id vote for the one who looks stoned!! Thats what we have now. He looks like he's just finished smoking some weed and he did in the Royal Bathroom and was late to have his picture taken too. I must say with honesty that I dont vote anymore since I found out its fixed. AND that way I cant be called to be a juror anymore YAY!! As for decaying goblins, those are Senators here, but we dont vote for them, the guy smoking too much appoints them when he's not closing the whole government for months!! Wow, we sure have a weird Government here in Canada....I keep saying that we're just a bunch of perpetual teenagers.....but we have fun eh!!
1 person likes this
• Canada
4 Mar 10
I forgot to say we should pick them with an ice pick!! They'd all look great in a huge glass filled with Vodka!!
1 person likes this
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
crushed politician is a great alternative to liquorice. although why you put liquorice in your drinks i have no idea anyway, it is for children...
@Torunn (2810)
• Norway
8 Mar 10
We don't usually give children drinks here ;-) Salty lquorice in drinks is very nice, not too fond of the tar liquorice though, it's quite disgusting. Maybe a bit like crushed politician?
1 person likes this
@Torunn (2810)
• Norway
4 Mar 10
I try to pick them based on politics, not looks, but there's a few here that are a bit too arrogant and behave like everyone else is there for them that I wouldn't have voted for even had I agreed with them. There has been quite a lot of discussion about why people comment on the weight of one particular female politician but not on the weight of her equally overweight male collegues. They should all loose some weight, but I don't really think that discussion has anything to do with politics. Not all news papers seem to agree with me. (stupid news papers, how can they not agree with me? I'm obviously always right! :-) ) I've met people who voted for Jörg Haider because he was such a handsome man. Slightly worrying, as was his politics.
1 person likes this
@jb78000 (15178)
9 Mar 10
what does that mean? remember rabbits are dense.
@Torunn (2810)
• Norway
9 Mar 10
"Verrückt" means crazy, but here it was a word-play on that it also can mean moved. Approximately. I don't think you'd use it as "moved" normally, but then in Carinthia not many things are normal ;-)
@epicure35 (2822)
• United States
7 Mar 10
While it seems increasingly difficult to chose a candidate based on truth, honor, and character, I try to hear honorable principles and truths spoken by those who are running. Looks do have a place in political decisions, and, in many cases you can tell a man's character, in part, from his countenance, at least in those who are genuine. Since many in politics lie, it is wise to develop discernment in that area. The sham and liar who has invaded our country was easily discernable as a liar from the first instant I saw him. I do not believe him to be particularly good looking, but that is neither here nor there. It is in his "lying eyes" that dishonor and hatred lie. Re Palin, again, she is prettier than the average female politician, but it is in her values and beliefs and genuine character that I see her value. I hope she doesn't sell out those values as she becomes a TV personality. The eyes are truly the window to the soul, and clear eyes are important; the imposter certainly doesn't have them. Add to that his actions and complete disdain for our citizenry, coupled with his lying need to keep his vital records sealed at taxpayer expense, and the ugly picture is complete. Nancy Pelosi is not bad looking, but you can see a stone cold witch in her eyes. Of course, we all like our politicians to be clean cut, but ugly is both in the eye of the beholder and in the insides of those who choose to be power-mongers rather than servants of the people they are charged with protecting.
1 person likes this
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
you do not like obama much do you? so i assume you pick people you think you can trust.
@epicure35 (2822)
• United States
8 Mar 10
Why, yes, I do not like O much; sarcastically: how did you guess? Your assumptions are correct and incisive; I chose those I hope I can trust to say what they mean and mean what they say. While I understand that, even in the best of circumstances the best of us are unable to keep SOME promises, the kind of corruption rampant today is not of that kind. Too many politicians are easily bought and sold. Obama is a "horse of another feather", because he is an outright traitor and America-hater whose intent is to destroy America. Somehow I can't find that likeable; he's just no ordinary liar.
@laglen (19783)
• United States
4 Mar 10
Heck no. I voted for Ron Paul in the primary. And I would gladly vote for Cheney. Looks do not matter a fig to me. But you do need a candidate that can lead which means they have to have some charisma.
@jb78000 (15178)
9 Mar 10
i remember being puzzled that your democrats ever put up john kerry. the man clearly has a charisma bypass - were they trying to throw the election or something?
1 person likes this
@Cutie18f (9564)
• Philippines
4 Mar 10
We can't deny the fact that people do have the tendency to judge people by how they look. We have that innate desire to choose the better-looking candidate because he or she looks pleasing to the eyes. Some people no longer want to have aging or old leaders and would easily vote for younger, more attractive candidates whose policies are not very clear.
@jb78000 (15178)
9 Mar 10
i know it is an inbuilt tendency, even if people don't realise they are doing it. why don't we just say sod it and get ALL candidates to be former models?. in fact you could have miss/mr world type contests to pick them. they'd probably do an equally erm good job and figureheads rarely have much real power anyway
@Ravenladyj (22992)
• United States
4 Mar 10
I dont do politics myself..I think they are ALL full of it...also since I can't vote here in the U.S (where I live) or in Canada (since I dont live there anymore) its a none issue for me BUT to answer your question, looks have NTHING to do with it..It would be solely on their political policies..
1 person likes this
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
that is commendable. you are not voting in the xfahctor winner after all.
@urbandekay (18314)
4 Mar 10
I would be more likely to vote against them were I influenced at all but I agree that the cult of celebrity is a corrosive agent in society. all the best urban
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@jb78000 (15178)
4 Mar 10
well speaking from my own experience i know there were a lot of people that voted for the blair creature partly because he was relatively young and presentable. and back when labour got in i remember lads discussing how cute or not cherie was. it is slightly disturbing when people describe a politician as 'endearing' or 'cute' - factors when choosing your next puppy maybe, for choosing a leader no.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
5 Mar 10
In our case, here in the Philippines, we pick politicians depending on their plans for the country. But usually, people vote a politician according to his political background and public service. During the campaign of President Obama, I feel that he will make a big change for America. The current status initially Mr. Obama faced was very difficult since your country was facing allot of problems on the time he was elected. People vote him in belief of his plans for America and the excellent political background he has in the past. I'm looking forward that America will stand-up from being down with your current president. Just let us give him time. By the way, on electing a leader, sometimes people vote because a political candidate was a star. The popularity of this people really help them to have a spot on the government. But somehow, we can't judge them badly if they feel they can serve the country (without self-centered interest). All people has the right to lead but the things they need to posses are good leadership and plans for the country. Its only a plus factor for being a prominent people because f showbiz publicity. But the citizen has the choice if they want to elect this kind of people.
• United States
5 Mar 10
What political experience? His senatorship, where he voted here - not yea or nay, but here - through most of it. People voted him in because he was considered 'a rock star.' I like my rock stars at concerts, not in the White House. He doesn't have a clue what he's doing and it shows. His ratings are dropping like a rock people are seeing the results of his election.
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
well i am not arguing about somebody else's president, but are you sure obama was elected solely on the basis of image? i think at least some voters are more sensible that that...
• United States
8 Mar 10
It doesn't seem that way. After his being on the road and giving double the speeches about his healthcare plan that either Bush or Clinto gave about EVERYTHING during their double presidencies, he still thinks he hasn't explained it enough. He doesn't understand NOBODY wants it!
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
7 Mar 10
Since you asked... 1 Whether their record is consistent & faithful to their promises 2 If they share my opinions on the big issues 3 What experience they have 4 Whether they've been found honest & trustworthy 5 They must be ethical in all things 6 They must be a person of faith 7 They must be pro-life 8 They must never be arrogant & disdain their constituency (think Pelosi) 9 If married, they must be faithful to their spouse, & consider they're equals 10 They must be willing to go all out for America's freedom, & for decency. I don't care what a person running for office looks like. I've never bothered to look at most of them, & if they have a name such as Pat or Chris, I won't even know if they're female or male. Age, color, religious preference--none of that stuff matters (except for atheists & some really spooky cult types)--it's what he or she thinks & does that matters. Oh, & I do have Atheist friends, but I'd never vote for them, militant or not. Only someone who understands following God should be able to have power over Americans, who are motivated by love & obedience to God, for the most part. That's my position, & I'm sticking to it. That answer your question? Maggiepie "This is the day which the Lord hath made; let us rejoice & be glad in it."
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
surprise visit mags,so you are saying you want politicians to have similar standards to you? fair enough. when you say faith though do you mean ANY faith or christianity?
1 person likes this
@Maggiepie (7821)
• United States
8 Mar 10
As I said: "...religious preference--none of that stuff matters (except for atheists & some really spooky cult types)..." In short, most faiths would be agreeable to me. There are many Christian sects I don't agree with on dogma, & of course, non-Christian ones, too, so long as they hold the same standards & apply them to their lives. They could be anything from Jewish to Shinto, or some of the Native American (including some South American) faiths, if they have the same basic standards: honesty, holding God most high, not a thief or murderer, etc. There ya go. Happy now? Maggiepie "I have proudly affirmed that the Mexican nation extends beyond the territory enclosed by its borders & that Mexican migrants are an important, a very important part of it." ~ Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo, at a meeting of the National Council of La Raza ("The Race")
@bystander (2308)
• Philippines
6 Mar 10
in recent history, we see a lot of celebrities succeeding in politics. reagan started it all -- from governor to president of the united states. then schwarzenegger, now governor of california. clint eastwood was once a mayor of a small town. in the philippines, where i live, celebrities are now hogging the political limelight, with actors and actresses getting elected to various positions -- senators, congressmen, governors and mayors, even councilors and barangay chairman. while many do good in their new careers, others should stay being actors or actresses. for me, i will never vote for a trespasser.
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
although celebrities are decent enough politicians some are clueless and really should have kept to the talk show round
@bystander (2308)
• Philippines
8 Mar 10
thanks for the response, jb. have a nice day...
• Philippines
5 Mar 10
Well, looks is the first thing you see in a person, so I think thats a really big part of why a person chooses them. In our country, it's not much of the looks, but of the popularity, specially if you are from the entertainment business, then there's a big chance that you will win, because people know you, and they vote for the people who they know, even if they are not good in politics.
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
it is odd how many politicians come from the entertainment business. some end up being ok though
• Philippines
9 Mar 10
That's true. Some turns out really okay, and some have made changes to politics that are really good. But some of them are really just a headache. I mean, they would run, thinking that people would vote for them because they are popular. It just downright downplays the intelligence of the voting public.
@sunny68 (1327)
• India
4 Mar 10
in this part of the world, the politicians have lost their integrity. it is practically impossible to trust a politician for honesty. in fact the voting criteria here is as to who is least corrupt. i have never voted for any politician and it seems that i will not find one worthy to vote....(at least the current circumstances indicate so)...
@jb78000 (15178)
9 Mar 10
problem here is if you vote one bad lot out you get another bad lot in. often indistinguishable, except for some reason the new lot often seems just slightly worse. then they swap over again and same thing, new lot slightly worse.
@sunny68 (1327)
• India
9 Mar 10
....very true....and unfortunately there seems to be no alternative in sight. power corrupts (and perhaps innovates with time)....play safe and avoid politicians is perhaps the new mantra...
@RobtheRock (2485)
• United States
6 Mar 10
I vote for people based on their policies. They can be old and decaying, but if they're smart, wise, and say what I like or if I disagree and find they have a good point, I'll vote for them. Also, many people in the states supposedly don't like people who "flip flop." To me, a person who flip flops is a person who shows wisdom because he does what is best. For example, if Joe says he believes all homeless people can get jobs, then goes out and sees that they can't, and then says, "no, all homeless people cannot get jobs," this is a supposed flip flop. To me, Joe is doing the best thing, telling the truth and trying to do what's best. Sometimes politicians make statements before getting all the facts. I admire those who admit they made a mistake instead of lying because they don't want to be called "flip flops."
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
i suppose u-turns are acceptable in some circumstances but i would expect politicians to make informed choices most of the time so as this becomes unnecessary
@K46620 (1996)
• United States
5 Mar 10
I always vote based on policies and principle. Voting on looks is a waste and very dangerous.
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
best policy, after all you are not voting for a catelogue model
• United States
5 Mar 10
If I feel they are honest and not just going endlessly over talking points, they might get my vote. In the last election, I did not like or trust either presidential candidate. Although she might not have given the answers the 'handlers' wanted her to give everytime, I was happy to see that when the teleprompter was off, Ms. Palin didn't hem and haw, but filled the space quite nicely. I also felt she was honest when she wasn't being 'handled' and wish the fools running the campaign had left her alone. I don't care how a candidate looks, but I do care if they are flat out lying and I felt Obama and McCain did that very well.
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
what lies do you think obama and mccain told?
@hofferp (4739)
• United States
5 Mar 10
I vote on the individual's stances/views on the issues and on whether I believe them. Looks have nothing to do with it. He/she could have a wart on his/her nose and it wouldn't matter, as long as I agree with him/her on the priorities, policies, programs, plans, etc.
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
i am pretty much the same, looks come bottom of what i look for in a politician.
5 Mar 10
I'll definitely go for a politician with a reasonable political agenda...well obama has a good political will...and on my prospective he's good looking too...:)
@jb78000 (15178)
8 Mar 10
well looking presentable might help a politician with diplomacy so maybe it is not COMPLETELY irrelevant...
• India
5 Mar 10
well i would vote for those politicians who have good track record. he should be development man , he should have clean image , he should do something for society . i would like to vote for transparent and approachable man than a person who is non approachable . would prefer youngster to lead
@jb78000 (15178)
9 Mar 10
why would you prefer a younger politician? more approachable?
• Philippines
5 Mar 10
for me his/her experience is the best asset.Considering of God fearing,honest,trustworhty and willingness to help his/her fellow men
@jb78000 (15178)
9 Mar 10
so high standards and plenty of experience then? i suppose this is how you would pick just about any employee.