Do you have a favourite historical peoples or era? What do you like about them?

@pandaeyes (2068)
March 10, 2010 8:33am CST
I really like everything about the Roman era. We were conquered by the Romans way back and there are parts of the country with old ruins of roman buildings. I studied it with the kids for our homeschooling history for a while and it is very interesting. I really like how ingenious these people were. We have some Latin lessons on CD at home and it is quite nice to know a few words even though I never seem to get past the basics. One time on holiday ,we went to visit an Ancient Britain settlement(reconstructed of course) and it is hardly surprising that the Romans domineered when you compare the two cultures. Do you have a favourite era or interest in history?
4 people like this
7 responses
@jwfarrimond (4475)
10 Mar 10
I have to say Roman. It was one of the worlds great civilisations and at it's greatest extent under Hadrian, it was the only time that you could have travelled from the north western limit of the empire in Britannia all the way to the Persian Gulf without leaving the territory of Rome and needing only one or at the most two languages and one montetary system for the whole extent. It comes as something of a shock to people who have little knowlege of history to realise that it was not until the beginning of the 19th century the roads were built in England that were at least as good as the Roman roads, and not until the end of the 19th that some major English cities were provided with clean piped water and effective sewers - something that your average Roman urban dweller took for granted. It had a huge influence on our present civilisation in many different areas not least in architecture - witness the huge numbers of civic buildings in both Europe and America that are built to a classical model.
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@pandaeyes (2068)
11 Mar 10
Hooray another vote for the good old Romans. I think we unlearned a lot of technology which I suppose was why part of history is called the dark ages. It was the time when people ignored past endeavors and sadly lost old skills.
@pandaeyes (2068)
19 Mar 10
Some boffins just like to seem mysteriously better informed in my opinion. I would far rather have lived as a Roman than as a tudor . I suppose even in the roman times there were still those who could not take advantage of the modern conveniences of the day just as there are now though.
19 Mar 10
Most city dwellers did have access to fresh water piped in by an aqueduct from outside the city. Even in Britain, which was just as about as far from the center of classical civilisation that you could get, the inhabitants of the major cities had access to clean water and adequate sewage disposal. In Wroxeter for example, even though the water supply of the townhouses came from wells in the courtyard, the latrine was flushed by water that was supplied to the entire city by aqueduct and piped down each street. The same aqueduct supplied water was usually piped to public fountains where anyone could get clean water. Roman London, Lincoln and York all had well built sewers and aqueducts and it was not until the end of the 19th century, after a particularly bad cholera epidemic that Lincoln got clean piped water and built sewers. The Roman sewer systen was discovered during the sewer work - still in good condition as were the York sewers when they were investigated by archaeologists. Yes, I'd much sooner have lived in the Roman period than the medieval, clean running water, adequate sewage disposal, hot baths, properly glazed windows (with real glass) and central heating!
@megamatt (14333)
• United States
10 Mar 10
I love history so there are really too many for me to name. If I had to name everyone that I enjoyed for whatever reason, I think I would be here for a while. I find the Romans and the Greeks rather interesting. There is a lot of interesting people and advancements behind them. In fact, many of their advancements are being felt today and have enriched the life of generations to come. The Egyptians are another group. Studying those who have ruled throughout time and time again have been impressive for sure. Their beliefs, their cultures, their advancements, pretty much everything about them is quite fascinating. Of course, you could really play a similar game for pretty much every other historical group. Just so many fascinating people and a rich history involving an entire tapestry of culture throughout the annals of history.
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@pandaeyes (2068)
11 Mar 10
I think modern man has grown very arrogant in his think that is time is the most knowledgeable. I am sure if everything was set back a thousand years, we would be the clueless ones and have to finally admit that the man of the day was the technologically superior.
@p1kef1sh (45647)
10 Mar 10
I don't have one favourite period really. I love the Civil War and quite like the end of the 19th century. My current favourite is the mediaeval period between 1199 and 1272 covering the reigns of King John and his son Henry III. That's maybe because I guide in a 13th century cathedral where we work with one of the surviving copies of the 1215 Magna Carta. Also I shall shortly start working for some 13th century alms houses too. I am a bit of a history bore if I am allowed!
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@pandaeyes (2068)
10 Mar 10
Ooh lucky you. I love old buildings. Hubbys father was an Architect and knew quite a lot about oldy worldy buildings. I like all the stuff about the Battle of Hastings too. Lovely to look at pictures of the tapestry about it and pick out the latin . Where I used to work,we did exhibition pictures and panels for quite a lot of different historical venues. So often would see interesting pictures and of course we had to read all the bumph because it mustn't have any spelling mistakes in it.
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@derek_a (10903)
10 Mar 10
I like the Ancient Egyptian area as it was so filled with mystery and suspense. For instance, nobody seems to know where the pyramids came from and who built them to such an exact geometrical shape. Some archeologist say that they were build long before the Egyptians appeared. _Derek
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@pandaeyes (2068)
10 Mar 10
Oh yeah they are very intriguing aren't they? I love how they were building those massive structures so long ago. I think no one has actually really hit the nil on the head about how they managed it, it is all speculation. We went to see the Tutankhamen thing in London last year. Some beautiful old things. Really hard to understand how they could make such lovely stuff with such limits to their technology.
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11 Mar 10
I have always loved the medieval period, not just the fairy tale and romance of King Arthur and the Round Table but the history and the life and times of the people together with the wonderful mythology of the medieval time. I am facinated by the Isle of Avalon, of Morgaine le Fey and have many wonderful books. I love wearing medieval dresses too, I make them myself, usually from velvet
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@pandaeyes (2068)
11 Mar 10
Wow you have developed you interest to reach out into your life in other ways. I think that happens a lot. My daughter liked the Egyptians and would spend hours reading about them and then drawing them and looking at pictures. I like the books by Rosemary Sutcliffe which are children s historical novels but quite nicely written. They have excellent line drawings which are rather medieval looking. A bit like stained glass windows. There are stories that Arthur was from Wales and Really called Artos (the bear) and was descended from the remaining romans who didn't go home after the rest were recalled. We went to see the ruins at Tintagel in Cornwall years ago and there is a cave on the cliff called Merlin's cave.Sadly a lot of the area is commercialized,everything that can be is named King Arthur's or Camelots this or that.
@Sandra1952 (6052)
• Spain
11 Mar 10
Hello, Pandaeyes. For me, it's the Tudor period. I would have loved to have been alive when Shakespeare was writing his plays, and so much new learning was coming through as well. Then there was all the exploration, and things we take for granted today - like potatoes - being brought into the country for the first time. It must have been a very exciting time - unless you were one of Henry VIII's queens, of course!
@pandaeyes (2068)
11 Mar 10
They sound like much earthier days . Judging by the type of things that Shakespeare comments on. Fancy having the kings Army go around the country and 'recruit' . I like how apprenticeships were arranged in those days. At least the 'juniors' knew that at the end of their learning,they would be considered craftsmen and could get work anywhere. I wonder how much was charged for a Potato when they first were introduced?
@Hatley (161768)
• Garden Grove, California
11 Mar 10
hi pandaeyes I got interested in the Roman era back when I finished my last two years of college in my mid fifties as I had a minor in Roman and greek literature and history. I was intrigued by the many inventions by both the Greeks and the Romans too. I also took a year of Latin so it all helped to intrigue me and fascinate me to learn how they lived and what all they did. I had never been much of a history buff before but learning about the Romans was so much fun.
@pandaeyes (2068)
11 Mar 10
They certainly were remarkable. I don't know very much about the ancient Greeks. Apart from their philosophers we don't hear as much about them. I suppose the Romans did actually settle in England and that is why there is a lot more to see of their lives. We have a little museum in town with roman findings from the river area. Our town is built on a river with barracks for the soldiers as a major part of it and there was a roman barrack here long ago.