Would you?

@p1kef1sh (45642)
March 10, 2010 8:36am CST
The UK medical authorities have refused to allow all children to be immunised against chicken pox on the grounds of cost and the fear that it might induce shingles when the child is older. The real concern apparently is that they are worried about the concern that some parents may have about the safety of the inoculation. Medical experts say that this is the minority and that the serum is entirely safe now. Would you have your children inoculated (assume that it is a free inoculation). Or are you sceptical and would prefer to let them take their chance with the illness?
12 people like this
26 responses
@dawnald (84131)
• Shingle Springs, California
10 Mar 10
It wasn't free and I did. Chicken pox is far more dangerous than the vaccine and you get the shingles with that too...
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
We had our daughter inoculated as well. She still caught chicken pox though. On a train and as each mile passed up popped another spot! LOL.
3 people like this
@dawnald (84131)
• Shingle Springs, California
10 Mar 10
Wonderful... Did she catch it from the vaccine?
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
I don't think so. It was a long time ago but I think that she got it from a child at her nursery.
1 person likes this
@pandaeyes (2068)
10 Mar 10
Both my kids had chicken pox and it was a very mild illness. I had it myself when I was 22 and it was like a smack in the face, exhausting, debilitating and weakening. Much better to have it when you are little and can be taken care of by your parents and then have the immunity for the rest of your life. Hardly anyone gets complications from chicken pox but I suppose there are always going to be exceptions as with most illnesses.
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
My sister and I both had chicken pox at the same time. Then my Dad caught it, he'd have been about 40 and it nearly killed him. It got into his windpipe and laid him out for a fortnight - that's two weeks in bed - before he could then start to recover. He has asthma too and that caused complications as he struggled to breathe. Not a nice thing at all. We on the other hand were back to school in a couple of weeks.
2 people like this
@pandaeyes (2068)
10 Mar 10
Same here I had to have two weeks off work and then was very weedy for a while. Work were not happy because one of the other workers had caught it and came to work which was how I caught it (most likely from drying hands on the same kitchen towel at break). My son had it in the half term holiday (he was 5) and my daughter(3 and a half) got it about 2 weeks later and was just a bit bad tempered for a week.
• United States
10 Mar 10
well i have heard of everyone getting the chicken pox but maybe 2 people in my life that got shingles.. i think its worth the safety now not to mention adults getting chicken pox can be really serious.. but eh what do i know???
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
I'd have mine inoculated I think. Shingles is nasty though. Very painful apparently.
2 people like this
@Hatley (164672)
• Garden Grove, California
10 Mar 10
you do not get shingles from the vaccation, you get them from having had chickenpox as the virus then hides in your body and if you are badly stressed it can produce and will produce shingles at the drop of a hat, those who are innoculated do not have the virus in their body contrary to popular belief, my own doctor explained that to me when I had the shingles you do not want to chance them, they hurt, they sting, they zap you with a million little electric shocks, very very miserable.
@dragon54u (31605)
• United States
10 Mar 10
I remember when they came out with that vaccine and all the controversy surrounding it. I did not have my children inoculated and would not now if they hadn't had the chicken pox. The disease is not life threatening so I must assume that it is a natural part of life that kids go through. Polio and other life-changing diseases need vaccines, chicken pox doesn't. Now I hear there is a shingles vaccination for people who have had the chicken pox. I'm conflicted about that one. I don't want shingles but I don't trust the makers of vaccines.
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
It's tricky I know. Chicken pox is rarely fatal but is uncomfortable. The attitude of the medics is why put your child through any discomfort when the inoculation is safe and will avoid them catching the illness and the attendant time off school etc. There is a shingles vaccine too. How effective it is I don't know.
2 people like this
@zoey7879 (3104)
• United States
12 Mar 10
My little sister was given the chicken pox vaccination here in the US before it was available to most in the US... She was 3 days old when I came down with the chicken pox, which took me about two weeks to get rid of. My mother had not had it either, so my sister wouldn't have stood a chance. She's 23 now. Never had chicken pox, never had shingles. Im not particularly concerned either way if my daughter has this vaccination, as she's older and catching it really wouldn't have to adverse of an effect... it'd just be irritating and inconvenient.
@twoey68 (13651)
• United States
10 Mar 10
For the most part, chicken pox is a normal childhood illness along with measles and mumps. I'd probably just forget the shot and let them get it if their going to. I had them when I was a kid and I lived through it so it's not that huge of a deal. [b]~~AT PEACE WITHIN~~ **STAND STRONG IN YOUR BELIEFS**[/b]
2 people like this
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
I had them too. Thank goodness.
2 people like this
@royal52gens (5380)
• United States
10 Mar 10
I have had chicken pox. It was not fun. It does not matter if you have had chicken pox or if you have the immunization, your risk of shingles later in life is the same. Also, you can get shingles even if you have never had chicken pox. Shingles is a different form of chicken pox. The virus/germs that cause chicken pox is exactly the same as the one that causes shingles. It sounds to me that the people who are opposing the immunization have not researched the disease very well. Perhaps, they should research it better and then make a decision.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
Your view is pretty much the same as the doctors' opinion here. Better safe than sorry.
2 people like this
@Hatley (164672)
• Garden Grove, California
10 Mar 10
royal52gens you have to have the virus from chickenpox leftover in your body in order to have shingles later in life, both er doctor and my primary care doctor told me that, I spent months with them about a year or so ago, horrible horrible horrible.I took antiviral medication all that summer and fall. finally a diluted form of medication also used for people with seizures stopped the last pain of my shingle. its a pain like a thousand little electic shocks tingling through half your body.
• Canada
10 Mar 10
Hmmmm, and I always thought it was people that had NOT had chicken pox, thus NOT gotten immunity that were at risk for shingles, which was just chicken pox, later in life and very dangerous and painful.
• Canada
10 Mar 10
I have had the chicken pox and so have my children, none of us was vaccinated and we all turned out just fine. It was never a life threatening situation. I believe the best immunity comes from natural exposure. I don't see the issue, except that it should be up to the parents to decide for thier children, not the state. Here, if you haven't vaccinated your children for certain things, they will not admit them to school. And some have caused Autism.
• Philippines
11 Mar 10
you're right about it Annie! When you had The CP you could have a lifetime immunity against the virus when you let it go through its natural course. The only management one can give is symptomatic treatment like giving paracetamol for fever and headache. An anti itch lotion for the itch. Of course a warm sponge bath to keep the area clean and reduce the possibility of infection.
@p1kef1sh (45642)
11 Mar 10
I tend to agree Annie although I think that sometimes immunisation is best. I had chicken pox as a child, in fact my parents exposed us to any child that had the "regular" diseases just so that we would get a degree of immunity by catching them.
• Canada
11 Mar 10
I did the same thing with my kids because I didn't get them until in my teens. Actually our entire middle school (Gr.7/8) was closed for 2wks, because over half the population was out with the pox. But I was glad to have it over with then, as I thought at the time if I hadn't had them, I was at risk for shingles later in life. I vaccinate all my sheep, to prevent diseases and it works well for them. I have a large population base to work with for statistics, so I understand the gov't mentatlity, but I don't like being treated like a sheep!
• Bangladesh
9 Apr 10
If the serum is medically proven safe then what's the risk?
@Comagirl (146)
• Spain
7 Jun 10
I think MysticToms answered this one - nothing has been tested for lifetime effects, and all vaccines that have passed medical trials have NEVER been tested on infants (it is neither ethical nor legal to use babies in trials). What happens is they test on healthy adults, then extrapolate dosages for body weight downwards. No allowance is made for the maturity of the immune system, and no one has any clue about potential long term sequelae, as none of the vaccines have been around long enough for that!
1 person likes this
• Bangladesh
7 Jun 10
Let's hope that no babies are harmed for this medical application. Have a nice day.
@mrsl2008 (635)
10 Mar 10
Hi, I have to say I wouldn't bother. I too believe it is one of those childhood illness. Although uncomfortable, I had them, my eldest (12) had them & I also have a 2 year old, who I wouldn't get a jab for. I am facing the decision on another vaccination for the 2 year old that I am unsure of. The good though, far out ways the bad but it's still worrying. I say unless your child is high risk for any illness, don't get it, paid for or otherwise. But then I don't even take paracetamol for a headache so what do I know Have fun MrsL x x
@p1kef1sh (45642)
11 Mar 10
I think that there are valid arguments both ways. We tend to be sheep like and just have these things done! LOL.
@mrsl2008 (635)
11 Mar 10
Very true x
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
10 Mar 10
I would rather them take their chances with the illness. I was probably immunised against it as a kid, but I got chicken pox as a 21 year old adult. It was not a pleasant experience, but not half as bad as what I am led to believe that shingles can be. If the kids can grow up and get through without getting in contact with chicken pox, then that is great. Why worry about the chances of them getting it and open them up to the chances of shingles later in life by injecting it into them?
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
I had it as a child, gave it to my dad and nearly killed him! As for shingles - I hope never to lock horns with that beast!!
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
10 Mar 10
Yeah, shingles is nasty. I saw some photos of my grandmothers back when she had them. It was sickening. Apparently, she is still suffering slightly from it two years later! It has not disappeared 100% over that time!
@jakill (835)
10 Mar 10
It's too late for my children. They both had chicken pox when they were small with no lasting ill effects, and some of my grandchildren have had it too. If it had been available, I probably would have followed my doctor's/clinic's advice and had them done, poor souls. At that time of my life I was more likely to follow the herd than question things. Nowadays I think it's more common to be a questioner, but it certainly wasn't them.
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
My daughter was vaccinated and my sister and I both had chicken pox. We gave it to my Dad who was about 40 and it came close to killing him. That's no exaggeration!
1 person likes this
@jakill (835)
10 Mar 10
That's certainly a good enough reason to promote the inoculation. Very glad to hear he did actually survive it.
@deebomb (15323)
• United States
11 Mar 10
When my kids were little they didn't have immunization for chicken pox. They all had a mild case of them. When my grandchildren were 3 and 5 and the immunization first came out the nurse discouraged against them. I have since had the shingles so if to day i was given that choice I would have them immunized. The chance of getting the shingles is not worth it. I had them last summer and they still bother even though my Dr tells me mine was a mild case. I am told that there is an immunization for the shingles.
@p1kef1sh (45642)
12 Mar 10
There is an inoculation against shingles but I don't know how effective it is. People that I know who have had it say how painful it is.
@ronaldinu (12445)
• Malta
11 Mar 10
I can speak about the latest scare of swine flue jab that was so highly opposed in my country. The media made us scared about the swine flu as if it was going to be the end of the world last January. January has passed and I am still here typing on mylot. I did not bother to take the swine flu jab. When I asked the doctor about the vaccine he told me it is a bit risky to take it and unless you are at health risk which I am not it is better not to take it. I have followed his advice. A total of 90,366 persons have taken the H1N1 vaccine but another 242,000 doses remain available, Health Minister Joseph Cassar has said in Parliament. http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20100302/local/242-000-swine-flu-jabs-remain-unused
@p1kef1sh (45642)
11 Mar 10
The media got swine flu so hyped up that people could be forgiven for thinking that they'd catch it just by going outside! I didn't have one either.
@derek_a (10902)
11 Mar 10
I had chicken pox when I was about 8 years old, and although I remember feeling pretty ill with it, I think that was my best innoculation. I am not sure that I believe in these innoculation unless the disease is very life-threatening and never have them myself. I did have polio and other life-threatening disease innoculations when I was a kid, but I am of the opinion that we are weakening our immune systems by giving innoculations for everything. _Derek
@p1kef1sh (45642)
11 Mar 10
I was pretty much the same as you. I remember having my polio serum on a sugar lump. Very non-PC today!
@xazwa1 (23)
• United States
11 Mar 10
thanks for sharing, i was not aware of this
@p1kef1sh (45642)
11 Mar 10
Glad to have informed you.
• Philippines
11 Mar 10
Hi there, I would not have my kid (if I have one) be immunized against chicken pox, Why? (please don't think I'm mad) The reason is that if you allow them to catch the pox they would have a lifetime immunity against it. Unlike immunization they do not get a 100% immunity against the virus. Immunization is only there to prevent but it does not mean your children would not have it, because there is always the chance they could have it. That's one common misconception about immunization. If your child has the chicken pox they are protected against catching shingles. Because the virus that causes shingles is almost the same as the one that causes the small pox. Studies revealed that most children who had chicken pox were protected against shingles.
@p1kef1sh (45642)
11 Mar 10
They have an immunity against Chicken Pox but it does increase their chances of Shingles apparently. But then so does the vaccination. So who is right?! LOL.
@catdla1 (6005)
• United States
10 Mar 10
I'm sceptical about immunizations in that I believe they carry significant risk to those it is given to. Thankfully it was not an issue for me when my son was growing up. He had chicken pox when he was in 1st grade. Most members of my extended family have had chicken pox, but out of 100+ relatives spanning 4 generations, only 2 have gotten shingles.
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
I had the shot and caught chicken pox anyway. Not too seriously, but then my parents subscribed to the theory that I should be exposed to any sick child that had something that I hadn't just to get the illnesses out of the way!
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Mar 10
The shot is given to children here and has been for decades yet I still got the chicken pox when I was in 5th grade. My avatar has had the shot and a classmate got the pox last November and infected 3 other children in the class. But my baby wasn't one of them. So I think it doesn't matter if you have the shot or not, if you are exposed to someone infected you run a 50/50 chance of catching it. But even with that being said, I still insist my children get all shots the doctor prescribes.
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
We have it here but it's not compulsory... yet! We had p1kelet "done" and she caught it anyway! LOL.
10 Mar 10
Hi p1key, I always belive that let nature takes its course if its not life threatening, never did us any harm, but I cannot remember having chicken pox, only measles, and I do think its a waste of money to inoculate children for this, it only a little disformfort. Hugs. Tamara xxxx
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
I had all the childhood illnesses that you can think of Tamara. Look at me now! LOL. XXXX
@owlwings (39059)
• Cambridge, England
10 Mar 10
I am in two minds about this. I had chicken pox and so did all my children (in fact, we intentionally exposed them to it so that they would get it). It is uncomfortable while it lasts but not, I think, a serious disease though it can be slightly disfiguring which is sometimes a problem for girls, I suppose. If you have had chicken pox, the virus remains dormant in the body and can emerge as shingles later in life. My father had it and I know that it is very painful. If the inoculation can also induce shingles, then I don't really see the point of it but if I could be assured that the serum is really safer than having chicken pox, then perhaps I might consider it if it were offered. On the whole, since I have had the disease and my children did to, I would be inclined to say that the inoculation serves little purpose except, perhaps, to protect one from a mild inconvenience.
@p1kef1sh (45642)
10 Mar 10
I think that he aim of the inoculation is to give a straight run through life, although there is a chance of shingles in later life. Personally I'd probably inoculate, but you give a compelling reason for not doing so.