Have you seen any sign language videos? Each country's signs are different.

@writersedge (22579)
United States
March 29, 2010 8:12am CST
I went online to try to refresh my memory about sign language. If you don't type in American Sign Language (ASL)or Signing Exact English (SEE)(they aren't the same), you can get some really different signs from a variety of countries. On Youtube, there were two videos that I was very interested in. One is the 2010 Census one and the other is DrDongGCSUS explaining about the Census. The first one talks about why it's important and what it's about. The second one talks about the importance of writing ASL as your language if it is your language and how to avoid scammers. It's very interesting to watch different people sign similar and different words. Both videos have captions underneath so that you can understand the meaning of what they're signing. So did you know that different places have different signs? Have you watched any sign language videos on the internet? You can find both videos by searching 2010 Census and American Sign Language. You can try this, but I'm usually one letter off: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwK05DqDoc Do you do sign language? If you do, which type? If you don't, have you ever been interested in it? Have you seen it and where? Do you use speech, lip reading, writing, sign language, a communication board-picture or word or electronic, regular computer, modified computer, electronic laranx (spelling?), hearing, hearing aid, regular telephone, modified telephone, telephone relay service, or anything else to communicate? My husband uses residual hearing, hearing aids, lip reading, writing, and speech. He's hearing impaired. My brother uses residual hearing and lip reading. He is also hearing impaired. He refused to learn sign language. Then he went on a construction job and had to learn construction sign language. Otherwise, the equipment was too loud for anyone to hear directions. He is also hearing-impaired. I'm the only person with good hearing and the only person who learned some ASL and SEE (see above, I defined them). So with all the hearing impaired people in my family, I'm the only one that learned some sign and I keep forgetting it because no one signs with me. It would come in handy, sometimes, if the rest of them did.
1 person likes this
7 responses
@celticeagle (114478)
• Boise, Idaho
30 Mar 10
I didn't know this. How interesting. It does sound logical when you think of how different languages are. Maybe you should have whoever else knows sign do so with you one day a week or during a certain part of the day. If they care they should help him and you out by doing this.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
30 Mar 10
I have no friends or relatives that do sign language, that is my problem. If I had friends and/or relatives that did sign language, I wouldn't have the problem. The people that took it with me back in the 80s, who knows where and what they're doing in this economy. 1/3 of the people in my area left and almost all of my friends as well as many of my relatives.
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@celticeagle (114478)
• Boise, Idaho
30 Mar 10
Are there any schools or therapists that might use this near you? You could ask them about videos perhaps. And then practice that way.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
1 Apr 10
I think I'll just stick with the ones online. If I can get snayone else interested in sign up in my family or friend circle, then I'll worry about other sign videos. What I need are real people and real situations.
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (90290)
• Marion, Kansas
29 Mar 10
For a couple of years at Head Start we were working with boys with cochlear implants who were profoundly deaf. Because the goal was to have them develop speech we signed every word for them (SEE) and had a full time sign language interpreter in the room with them. Our district has been good about that. We also use SEE with some of our MR students. I think just for consistency we use the SEE all the way around. I knew that different languages had different sign language, that is something I asked the interpreter about as I was curious. The difference between SEE and ASL as explained to me is that ASL signs concepts or ideas, where as SEE signs every word.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
30 Mar 10
When I worked at our ARC, we had developmentally disabled adults who couldn't speak. We paired sound and signs. Eventually, people who had never spoken before could do initial sounds and elementary signs. It was wonderful. The would be so excited when someone understood them. We did ASL. Milk, want milk, milk good, only one word at first and then two by the time I left could we combine. Angry he meant that he made me angry or he did something to me. That was better than the person just clobbering another person. We really got somewhere with them. They could choose food, drinks, activities and start to add something to it. I learned SEE because they needed interpreters, but I was never fast enough. They trained 10 people and the fastest 2 or 3 received jobs. But one person was a teacher who taught Kindergarden and was going deaf. She simultaneously taught them sign and words so they could communicate better with her, she did read lips and have some residual hearing, but the kids really loved it and were pretty bilingual by the end of the year. Neat, huh?
@GardenGerty (90290)
• Marion, Kansas
30 Mar 10
Awesome all the way around. I do not know if I could ever be fast enough either. Our interpreter loved her job. She actually had a degree as a shop teacher, but found this more to her liking.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
30 Mar 10
Up here, it's more money and they're required to give you more breaks.
@carmelanirel (21108)
• United States
29 Mar 10
I didn't know that, but suspect that in other languages it would be, because of the ASL, the "A" sdtanding for American. As for lip reading or sign language, I have tried so many times and like braille and learning a foreign language, I am not very smart.. I tried really hard with the sign language becasue my fav aunt is deaf and though she can read lips and speak, (she lost her hearing as a child, so she can talk, though sometimes it is hard to understand her), I wanted to learn so I can talk to her fluently and clearly. :( Maybe I should try again, and make my son learn with me, that way we can practice on each other, for the best way to learn is to use it as much as possible.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
29 Mar 10
That was supposed to be "go to," not got to.
@GardenGerty (90290)
• Marion, Kansas
29 Mar 10
Teaching children sign helps them develop their expressive language as well. It is a good thing to do. Just simple signs if he is really young. Have fun. I think signing is beautiful.
@laglen (19783)
• United States
30 Mar 10
I just took a sign class, ASL. You are right, it is different in different languages. Did you know that in different states, they have different signs. Kind of like a dialect or slang! Our church has a sign language choir! It is awesome, check out signs of faith on you tube. I am going to take another class soon. 20 years ago I did a special ed sign, I worked in a school for developmental disabilities. That was interesting
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
30 Mar 10
Yeah, we had a deaf man from Hawaii, he had a sign for "hang loose" instead of good-bye. It was cute. I took one class from a church, the rest from our Voc. Tech school. The church one, we learned how to sign "Silent night".
@laglen (19783)
• United States
31 Mar 10
very cool! We sign all of our hymns. Very moving
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
2 Apr 10
I think signed religious songs are very beautiful.
@ElicBxn (60053)
• United States
30 Mar 10
Way, WAY back in the early 1980's I worked with some deaf ladies and learned some Signed English. I'd guess that's more of SEE than ASL, actually, kind of a combination of the two, since you leave out some words in the Signed English, but you don't have the total abbreviated sort of separate language of ASL. And yes, I do know a bit about ASL since I worked with a lady who started a signing school and after she retired from the state, was there full time. http://www.aslschool.org/our_story.htm
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
30 Mar 10
Yes, there are combinations of SEE and ASL. The exact English leaves out nothing and ASL not only leaves out words, it's more into making a picture of what you mean, the word order is often totally different, etc. Thanks for the link. Seems like an interesting place.
1 person likes this
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
30 Mar 10
An autistic school. We did well with people who stuttered at the place I was, but the severely autistic people, just getting them to pay attention to anything, we didn't do very well with them. But our area is way behind helping people with autism. It's only been since the 90s that people were very well trained and since then, I've met people who have milder forms of it. Now there is all kinds of training, but every time I asked to go to any, no money in the budget and you don't work directly with any (the problem with changing jobs as often as I do).
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@dhysanne (451)
• Philippines
30 Mar 10
I have seen few ASL videos. But I didn't know that there are different types of Sign Languages. Good to hear from you. I'll check to see the video link you shared.
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
30 Mar 10
I just checked the link. It's missing something. But it does get you to YouTube where you can type in sign language or American Sign Language (I don't know if they have SEE there or not), then get different videos. Thanks for dropping by and I hope you do check out some of the videos. Thanks and take care.
• India
30 Mar 10
i am not seen any sign language videos .
@writersedge (22579)
• United States
30 Mar 10
Well, then go to Youtube and check some out. If your computer can handle it. When I first was on the internet, I had a slow dial-up connection and my computer couldn't handle it. Just go to YouTube and then type in sign language. If your computer is fast enough, all kinds of sign language videos will come up. You might want to check out the music and sign language ones first. People who don't know sign language at all usually like those best. After that, if you're interested in learning more, you can go to the different sign language classes on youtube. Thanks for responding, welcome to Mylot, and take care.