Conversations Appear Inncocent..But Are They?

@Janey1966 (24127)
Carlisle, England
July 6, 2010 7:53am CST
I shall give you a good example of a conversation that means something totally innocent here in the UK but in the US (other countries too, who knows?) it means something entirely different. OK, the conversation goes like this, bearing in mind it was at 6.30am before John went to work:- Me: "You OK?" John: "Not really..still tired for some reason." Me: "Awww, I'll be worried about you falling asleep at the wheel now!" John: (Laughter) "Nah, I'll be OK once I get in the car." Me: "Have a few f@gs. That should wake you up!!" John: (Laughter) "OK!" Now, over in America the above conversation means something entirely different. F@gs aren't cigarettes but,er, gay men. So, in America do you say "cigarettes" all the time? I'm really confused! As for John; throughout this day he would have a f@g at the back door before going to work, another two f@gs in the car on his way to work and another f@g in the car park before getting into work..oh, and not forgetting the two f@gs he has for his dinner. So, if John DID have all those f@gs over in the US he would soon lose the use of his legs wouldn't he? Haha! I don't mean to upset any gay men with this, honestly, it's just a discussion about words and how they can mean something else in another country. Now, over to you my friends. How would the above conversation be interpreted in YOUR country and do you have any more examples? Thanks in advance.
2 people like this
5 responses
@ElicBxn (60762)
• United States
6 Jul 10
I guess that means your a f@g hag? I, too, wait up when I get behind the wheel, but can't credit those cancer sticks for that, I don't smoke. Now, some areas of the U.S. will say, "smokes" as it "why don't you have a few smokes to help you wake up." Or "Why don't you have a smoke before we go?" Probably goes back to the days when they would tell guys - I think in the military - "Smoke 'em if you got 'em." as a kind of break.
@Janey1966 (24127)
• Carlisle, England
6 Jul 10
Yes, I have heard the word "smokes" used here too. Mum uses a variety of words, such as that one, tubes (don't ask!), snout and John uses "Cancer stick" sometimes to wind me up because I don't like either of them smoking but there's not a lot I can do about it. Mum smokes the most though and she reckons she's addicted to the cups of tea she has with the f@gs. Yeh, right lol. Just thought of another one which is "tab." That's not used very often these days, I think it must be quite an old word.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60762)
• United States
7 Jul 10
back in the 70's, "tab" was also used for acid...
@JenInTN (27565)
• United States
8 Jul 10
Yes..that might be taken a bit out of context here but I have heard them called that before. Just not often and not by the younger crowd..lol...I have heard them called Stoagies and smokes. I have heard them called cigs and cancer sticks too. Sometimes people will just say I need a smoke.
@Janey1966 (24127)
• Carlisle, England
8 Jul 10
Haha! "Stoagies!" What a fabulous word, I've never seen that one before, thank you.
@hexeduser22 (5854)
• Philippines
6 Jul 10
I'm not from US but I certainly understand what f@g means. What I don't know is that the word f@g have a different meaning in UK and in US This is funny
@Janey1966 (24127)
• Carlisle, England
6 Jul 10
That's what I mean about our conversation being so innocent but over in the US people would be rolling around laughing lol.
• Indonesia
6 Jul 10
Haha, yeah I understand there's a difference betweeen American and British English, and the Brits always very proud of their language cause they said they use proper English instead of American who already absorbed many slangs in their language. Because I live at a country that is non-English speaking country that largely influenced by American TV show, when I want to London it's quite hard to understand what they are saying because of the thick English accent. I kinda like it though, somehow it just make people has more integrity when they are talking.
• United Arab Emirates
6 Jul 10
hahaha....well that was a great conversation...excellent.. Well in india we follow the british english...so we speak the same way you do. But there has been an impression of the US english through the movies and lot of people have been using the slangs the way they do in the US.
@Janey1966 (24127)
• Carlisle, England
6 Jul 10
Can you think of an example off the top of your head...and thanks for responding by the way.