I'm going to make my own dehumidifier!

@dragon54u (31637)
United States
July 8, 2010 7:19am CST
I just looked it up and I guess hanging a bunch of calcium chloride over a bucket is effective. Isn't that just rock salt? I was thinking of using a plastic colander instead of rigging up something to hang it with. The humidity in here is awful! The drier the air, the cooler it feels and I need to banish this humidity. I looked at buying one but decent dehumidifiers are nearly $100 for the small ones!! I have one of those in my basement but I bought it when the economy and my finances were much healthier. Has anyone made with own dehumidifier? Any suggestions?
2 people like this
6 responses
@Aussies2007 (5339)
• Australia
8 Jul 10
You cannot counter heavy humidity with home remedies. The best dehumidifier is an air conditionning. It sucks all the humidity out of the room in minutes. That's why air conditionnings need a pipe attached to them on the outside. The water they are dripping is the humidity taken out of the room.
1 person likes this
@dragon54u (31637)
• United States
8 Jul 10
Then mine isn't doing a very good job. I can see the dripping from the pipe into the drain in the basement but it's humid in here. I have to turn it way down on a humid day like today to be comfortable. When it is dry, I can crank it up higher and feel comfortable. I'll try it anyway, I have everything I need and I just washed out the bucket and am letting it dry--had salt already in the garage. Since it's a free experiment, I'll see if it makes any difference.
• Australia
8 Jul 10
When was the last time you cleaned the filter of your air conditionned? The filter gets cover with dust from the room over time. You will see it when you remove the front cover of the box, if it is mounted in your window.
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@dragon54u (31637)
• United States
9 Jul 10
I have central air with a big unit in the basement and one sitting outside the house. I change the filter once a month and there never seems to be much on the filter, it's pretty particle-free in here I guess. There is some moisture in the bottom of the bucket but nothing like what I expected because it feels so humid in here.
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
8 Jul 10
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_chloride never tried to make a dehumidifier, my acs take most of the moisture out of the air...
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@dragon54u (31637)
• United States
8 Jul 10
Yay!! I have some in my garage and I have a bucket and a colander. I'll rig it up in a few minutes and see if it makes any difference, thanks!
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@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
8 Jul 10
probably have to hang it in front of or behind a fan
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@dragon54u (31637)
• United States
8 Jul 10
I plan on putting it near the floor vent where the air comes out. It's a very old house so it doesn't have vents near the ceiling, which would be ideal as cold air falls down.
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@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 10
It sounds like a great idea when you're low on cash. I could use something in our garage to lower the humidity since it isn't air conditioned. Please let us know if it works! Actually, I might try that tomorrow myself. We have some rock salt left over from our horrendous winter, an extra bucket and cheese cloth so I won't have to go out to buy anything. Since I've taken over the electric bill, I'll do anything to be able to keep the setting on the AC up as high as I can. Even with it set at between 78 and 80 degrees, the bill is still outrageous!
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 10
Oh! One thing, I heard that if you keep a bowl of silica gel in your closet or under a sink, it will help to keep it drier. For years, I've saved those tiny packets of silica gel that some with new shoes, purses and other things I've ordered. Once they've absorbed all the moisture they're going to, you can put them in the oven for 15 minutes or so and dry them out, then reuse the silica gel over and over. I found a flower drying kit at Goodwill once and scooped it up. I used to dry flowers with silica gel way back when and, when I saw this kit, unused by the way, I had to have it to get back into drying flowers but now I just may try that in the garage to see if it helps along with the rock salt thing.
2 people like this
@GardenGerty (102552)
• United States
9 Jul 10
If you save those little packets you may find them handy for a few other things. I had a nice watch that I accidentally got wet. It got moisture behind the crystal and stopped working. I put it in a bag with two or three of those and left it for a day or two and it was like new.
1 person likes this
@dragon54u (31637)
• United States
9 Jul 10
Thanks, both of you, for the suggestion about the silica packs! I'll start saving them, they'll be great for little jobs. There is already some moisture in the bottom of the bucket but not much. I have central air and Aussie says it's supposed to remove moisture--it does, I can see it dripping from the pipe in the basement but it feels so humid in here!
@flowerchilde (12547)
• United States
9 Jul 10
Wow, this all sounds great, especially as dehumidifiers reaLLy suck up the energy.. makes my bill increase by about 40% if it's run!!
1 person likes this
@dragon54u (31637)
• United States
9 Jul 10
It's not very attractive but you could dress it up by decorating the plastic bucket. Try it for a few days--you can use leftover salt from winter and a plastic pail and plastic colander from the dollar store. It might end up saving you a lot of money and at such a cheap price you could put one in every room. I'll be using the salt water to pour on some weeds I never seem to be able to get rid of so that's double duty!
@GardenGerty (102552)
• United States
9 Jul 10
Thanks for the great idea. I went and looked online as well. One site recommended charcoal briquettes, and others did say calcium chloride, and said you can get it as a product called DampRid, but that it is the icemelt salt. I do not think that is the same as rock salt. I now understand why my ice melt that I tried to save in plastic buckets always had water standing around it, even with the lid on. I learned a lot today because of this discussion. I have at least one place I need one as well. Thanks again.
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@dragon54u (31637)
• United States
9 Jul 10
I'm so glad you found this useful! I had left a bucket of sidewalk salt on the porch last winter and couldn't figure out why it had melted but now I know. Charcoal? Good idea! I plan to use the water from this stuff to pour on weeds I don't want, I'll see it that gets rid of 'em!
@LadyMarissa (12161)
• United States
8 Jul 10
Yes, I think calcium chloride is the same thing as rock salt. I've never tried to make my own dehumidifier, so I did a little research. I found this interesting & relevant to your plans... I just did this in my basement: bought rock salt and put it in cheap plastic colanders that fit over plastic buckets. The air might not circulate around the salt as well as if it were hung in a bag, so I'll have to look into that and see how it's working. Also, a large bag (25lbs) of rock salt was only $4. Another said... Go to a hardware store like Lowes, or if you're in a rural area go to the farm store, and buy Calcium Chloride. Wrap a pile of it in cheesecloth, tie it off, and hang it from a string over a bucket. Works wonders. (Farms use it for lowering humidity in a barn to prevent mold of hay) I believe the commercial stuff is called DampRid that you can buy at the hardware store. Have you considered moving the dehumidifier out of the basement to the living area & hanging the calcium chloride in the basement??? I hope this helps & it works they way you need!!!