Regal homes, abandoned, maybe saved?

@ElicBxn (60884)
United States
July 26, 2010 5:17pm CST
Well, as my friends probably remember, I was talking about going to a class reunion over the weekend. I went. One of the most interesting things I learned is that they are talking about making our old campus into a hotel/spa. There's some worry because its listed as a historic place, and the neighborhood is kind of fighting it, but I think it would be an excellent use of the property. In fact, I dreamed last night about it being one and wandering around the grounds trying to remember where things like the pool used to be. In my sleep I couldn't remember, tho awake I can. Here is a place up around Philly that some residents are hoping might have something like that done there. As big as this place is, it would make a GREAT hotel! http://www.philly.com/philly/classifieds/real_estate/99219874.html?cmpid=15585797 So, what do you guys thing? I think converting those grand homes that have falling into disrepair, and don't have a foundation to save them, is a great way to save some bits of history and a way of life most will never even dream of ever getting close in this day and age.
4 people like this
11 responses
@scififan43 (2440)
• United States
2 Jan 11
That sounds like a good idea. I am all for restoreing old homes to preserve history. it is a shame that there is not enough money to save them. I wish I could by an old home and get it restored. but maybe if I win the lottery lol.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60884)
• United States
2 Jan 11
Me too. In fact, my old church was converted into a bed and breakfast spa
• United States
2 Jan 11
Yes I was thinking about that that too, but a resturant sounds good too.
• United States
31 Jul 10
they might as well.plus it provides badly needed housing when made into apartments instead. they're doing a lot of that here,only it's not affordable,as often they're made into condos. they've been trying to get my house for years to do such,only we're not selling. (hence my FB rant the other day)
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60884)
• United States
31 Jul 10
hold out to the end! don't let them do it!
1 person likes this
@Lakota12 (42684)
• United States
27 Jul 10
I hate it when no ne takes care of the old tings and yup if they can keep whats outside and rebuild the inside for hotel think that would be grad. BUt how do they replace the marble that has been sold off?
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60884)
• United States
27 Jul 10
they can either use marble veneer or plaster (depending on where the marble is)
@Lakota12 (42684)
• United States
28 Jul 10
to bad it cant be real like in the first place!
1 person likes this
@JenInTN (27565)
• United States
29 Jul 10
I think that would be a good idea versus letting homes ruin. There are so many beautiful and historic homes that have just wasted away. There is a neighborhood here of protected homes. The problem with these is if you buy one..you can't do anything to them if you wanted. There is special permissions that have to be gotten.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60884)
• United States
29 Jul 10
very true, I knew someone that was talking about historic zoning and then discovered he couldn't add anything if he did, and he was wanting to add another bed and bathroom to the place
• United States
26 Jul 10
People who drive past this magnificent palace and not see it are blind as far as I'm concerned. How oould anyone possibly miss it? It's breathtaking and so mysterious. I would love to walk through this just to see and feel how it was a long time ago. I simply adore Victorian era buildings and memorabilia, and can't even imagine razing something this prestigious and gorgeous. Hopefully, it will become SOMETHING, so its history can be kept secure. It reminds me of the haunted Stanley Hotel in Stephen King's movie "The Shining." You are so right in saying "it's a great way to save some bits of history and a way of life most will never even dream of ever getting close in this day and age." I simply deplore when they tear things down to make room for, um, progress? Why is the neighborhood fighting it? Do they want it torn down? Thanks for sharing...I love stuff like this.
@ElicBxn (60884)
• United States
27 Jul 10
The neighborhood here in Austin at our old campus say that the area is not zoned for commercial growth on that side of Red River (the street that runs between it and the shopping center across the street.) so what do they want to happen, no body can afford to fix the old Perry Mansion (the old school campus) and this way it won't detract from the area while re-purposing the land. The fact is that the schools can't keep up the property, as hard as they might try. It needs a big influx of cash to save it. Same for that place in Philly... I don't know what the hold up is on it, its still structurally sound according to the article..
@nanajanet (4436)
• United States
26 Jul 10
I think that is a wonderful way to preserve these buildings. I do not live far from Philly so I should go and see that building.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60884)
• United States
27 Jul 10
oh! if you go you MUST post pix! (might be easier to see in the winter, but what do I know...)
@GardenGerty (100324)
• United States
26 Jul 10
I strongly agree with you on this one. There is no point in letting good, useful, beautiful buildings fall into disrepair out of nostalgia for what they were. I think using them will do more to preserve their memory than boarding them up and letting them sit, waiting for the right buyer. They are beautiful parts of the community and they should be used and appreciated.
@ElicBxn (60884)
• United States
27 Jul 10
I totally agree. The Perry Mansion (the old school campus) is a beautiful place, but has gotten pretty run down. They had pictures at the reunion, it was really cool
@dawnald (84146)
• Shingle Springs, California
28 Jul 10
I think it's a great idea to save the ones that can be saved. This reminded me of a Los Angeles landmark, the Ambassador hotel, which was razed and will be used by the LA school district. Sad that they couldn't save it...
1 person likes this
@dragon54u (31615)
• United States
28 Jul 10
I think it makes a lot of sense if they can get the zoning for it. We have way too many fine old buildings falling into ruin when they could be somewhat preserved. It saves the business money, they don't have to build from the ground up and thus will profit more and be able to hire more people. The more they make, the more jobs there will be because of expansion and adding more services. I live in a small city that has some exquisite old houses that have fallen into disrepair. Some have had to be torn down because no one will buy them or zoning prohibits anyone turning them into businesses. Many were destroyed so a hospital could be built, it just broke my heart--they could have turned those houses into lodging for patients' families, interns or others that need to stay near the hospital for a short time or a longer stay.
1 person likes this
@ANTIQUELADY (36488)
• United States
27 Jul 10
Good morning Elic, I am a big lover of old things, buildings , homes etc. I think anytime they can turn anything like that into something productive it is wonderful. To me it sure beats them tearing it down like they do here. They just recently demolished a beautiful old church here to build a new bank. I was totally disgusted w/that.
1 person likes this
@cerebellum (3871)
• United States
27 Jul 10
I agree! There are so many older buildings that should be refurbished and used as something else. The older buildings are built better and with more quality materials. I can't see tearing them down and building something cheap in their place. One of my favorite memories is when we used to take vacations at a resort called Bedford Springs, in Pa. It was like the place in Philly. There were pools and all kinds of things that you could do as a guest. It was very luxurious. I don't think it was a mansion before, but I am not sure. All I know about it's history is that it was used to detain Japanese Americans during the world war.
1 person likes this