Disney's Dress Code

United States
August 23, 2010 5:24pm CST
Many people know that when you apply to work at any of the Disney establishments (the parks, restaurants, ocean liners, etc.) that you are going to be expected to follow the rules. They expect you to conduct yourself a certain way and to dress a particular way. Your piercings are limited, tattoos are supposed to be cover, no outlandish color in your hair, etc. However, a lady who has been hired and wants to work with customers have declared that Disney is being discriminative because of their rules. Disney says that her Muslim head scarf is not part of their dress code. Because she complained about this, Disney gave her an alternative to wear which she said was an embarrassment to wear. Now, I get that the scarf is part of her religion and culture and that's completely important to her. However, I also know that Disney is extremely particular about appearances. They want their employees to look a certain way to portray a certain image. Also, according to the article, this woman also refused to accept a job that was away from the customer (which I believe would have allowed her to wear the scarf). Now she has filed a complaint against Disney. What do you think? Who's side are you on? Link to story: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100823/ap_en_ot/us_disneyland_muslim_worker
2 people like this
9 responses
@owlwings (39371)
• Cambridge, England
23 Aug 10
I would tend to be with Disney on this one. From the story, it seems to me that this lady is trying to make an issue of it for political, not personal, reasons. This seems to be a very similar case to the one of the airline stewardess whose small crucifix pendant was classified as 'jewellery'. Disney have clearly stated rules about the way that their employees should look and that is quite legal (if apparently somewhat narrow-minded ... but they, presumably, have done their customer research well). They do not, I am certain, discriminate on the grounds of colour, race or creed, as required by the law of the land in which they operate. Perhaps it is right that individuals should, from time to time, 'test the system'. That is healthy for 'the system', sometimes justifiably embarrassing for the companies who think they are large enough to make their own rules but does tend to make the people who choose to be the 'activists' seem to be rather more important than they really are. I have to say that I do not like the Disney industry. There is a great deal that is very sick about it, even though Walt, himself, approved its beginnings. I like even less, however, people who try to pretend that a political point is a personal issue (even though I admit, as I said above, that the point sometimes has to be made in order to keep corporate power toeing the democratic (with a small 'd') line.
1 person likes this
• United States
25 Aug 10
She can file a complaint and even take Disney to court, but Disney will win the case. Now if it was Disney not offering her a job cause of her religion than that's a different story, but Disney did offer a job where she can wear scarf. If she didn't like the offer then she should look some other job then. I'm with Disney side on this. Disney is not discriminative in my opinion. I have worked there and you do have to follow the dress code. If you are going to work in the park area, each cast member have to follow the dress code. That means tattoos have to hidden, no outlandish color in your hair, you can't even wear jewelry except a watch and depends on what position you are working at (though you might be able to wear earrings, but very small ones), have your hair done very neatly, guys have to have fully shave on facial hair or have the mustache done like Disney want it, etc. It may seem discriminating, but it isn't. Many people come and visit Disney world from different countries. Do you want to see a guy with a full body tattoo and greeting your kids? Probably would scare your kids. The dress code is just to put each cast member in a Disney image. Disney is suppose to be a magical place and doesn't want anything connected to the real world. They want to make it like a far away place. Which is why they have this dress codes. I'm with Disney on this case.
@julsie (70)
25 Aug 10
it might not even make it to court, Disney will just pay her to go away which is probably what she wants at the end of the day.
• United States
26 Aug 10
Probably, cause Disney do pay when they want to keep someone quiet. And they pay big time which is usually one million dollars. Though if they do pay her, it probably be less than that.
@HansonFan (1659)
• United States
10 Jan 11
I am on Disney's side completely. They offered her two alternatives and its not their fault that she didn't accept either one of them. They tried to cooperate but she was too determined to get it her way. There are times when you can do that, but when it comes to a job its just not feasible. Especially with a job at a theme park where every detail matters.
@julsie (70)
24 Aug 10
you want to work for disney? then you gotta follow the 'disney code', and they did offer her another job so i dunno what she complaining about
• United States
24 Aug 10
There are certain standards we have to follow when it comes to being employed for someone other than yourself. The way I see it is this is allowed, now you open room for all other cultures and customs to also impose their rights as well. So I have to believe that rules are there for a reason.
@o0jopak0o (6407)
• Philippines
24 Aug 10
well im on disney's side
@sizzle3000 (3040)
• United States
24 Aug 10
I get that Disney has a dress code. All businesses have one. But certain ones should be taken into consideration when you have people of a different culture applying for the job. Why should she be punished for her culture? Disney of all places should be an equal opportunity business.
@sender621 (14956)
• United States
24 Aug 10
Disney has been an established and well respected company for many years. It is only common sense that such a fine company should earn a level of courtesy. Disney has been a family oriented company to look up to. Your appearance in employment of disney should be reflected with honor and pride.
• United States
24 Aug 10
Since I have had many friends and family that have worked for Disney, I can tell you how bad it truly is. It goes above and beyond just the dress code, but I will address the dress code first. Disney doesn't like it if women wear head dress, Berkas, lots of tattoos and piercings (I have seen employees get fired for this), no religious symbols (crosses are pushing it), hair and clothes should be worn appropriately (and people are often confused with this one). Now, lets get to be an employee of Disney. People don't often get promoted, you could be in the same position for a long time, and being a janitor is better than pushing the carts and playing the characters. The characters can have nasty attitudes, and those princesses can be real nasty behind stage. They think that they are entitled just because they are playing princesses. I refuse to ever sell my soul to Disney.