Can You Tell Me The Difference???

@LadyMarissa (12161)
United States
September 29, 2010 6:41pm CST
A person walks into a bank with a gun & robs it. They are captured on camera, but you can't see their face fully. That night on the evening news they always say that the person isn't a suspect...they're just a person of interest. Does anyone here know the difference between a suspect & a person of interest??? To me, they are one in the same...the cops think you either did it or you know who did!!!
2 people like this
6 responses
@chiyosan (30205)
• Philippines
30 Sep 10
i think what they were trying to say was that for one to become a suspect.. you have to know and are able to identify the person? and since they referred to this person as a subject of interest means, they can start their hunt for the "suspect". now that's hard to differentiate! ha ha geeshhhh
2 people like this
@LadyMarissa (12161)
• United States
30 Sep 10
In several cases they have said "we think this person did it...However, they are only a person of interest not a suspect". In my growing up a suspect was the person they thought did it, but they couldn't prove it.
1 person likes this
@Angelwriter (1956)
• United States
30 Sep 10
I could be wrong, since my only knowledge of the law comes from tv. But, I think a suspect is the person they suspect of committing the actual crime. A person of interest may not have committed the crime, but they may know info to lead to the capture of the real criminal. Committing a crime and knowing who committed it are not the same thing. Me robbing a bank isn't the same thing as my brother robbing it and me knowing about it. I don't know how it works that someone caught on camera robbing a bank isn't a suspect. But, I think possibly the police may say someone is a person of interest rather than a suspect (even if they think the person did it) because it doesn't sound as bad. A person may be more likely to come forward and talk to the police if they don't think they're a suspect. Or friends and family might be willing to talk if they hear "person of interest" rather than "suspect in a crime."
2 people like this
@LadyMarissa (12161)
• United States
30 Sep 10
You may be right. I think you'd have to be a fool to think that the cops have your pic albeit not a clear pic & not realize that you're a suspect instead a person of interest. One person of interest in South Carolina went in to prove that the pic they had of him wasn't really him. He was promptly arrested & put in jail. While in jail, there was a second bank robbery & his pic was again taken by the bank security camera. A few days later there was a third pic; but, by then, he was released from jail. Now he is a person of interest in #1 & #3 & a suspect in the #2 even though he was sitting in jail at the time. I agree ALL 3 pics look alike, but he has an air-tight alibi for #2!!! I really don't understand how he could just be a person of interest on the 2 he very possibly could have done & be a suspect in the one it was virtually impossible for him to do!!!
1 person likes this
@canaussie (223)
• Australia
29 Sep 10
Will that "person of interest" be summoned, interrogated etcetera? If that's the case, I don't see any difference with the word suspect, it's all the same, it is just mere description. A suspect is based on suspicion that the person has committed a crime, unless they have substantial evidence, the person remain a suspect and not a perpetrator.
2 people like this
@LadyMarissa (12161)
• United States
30 Sep 10
Yes, they are summoned, interrogated, etc!!! Even the cops go on the news saying "We are looking for... This person is NOT a suspect; however, they are a person of interest. Well, a suspect is a person of interest up & until they are charged. I just really don't understand why they go through the BS of saying they are NOT a suspect!!!
1 person likes this
@quita88 (3716)
• United States
1 Oct 10
Well, I am interesting..........I am not a suspect tho... Snap ! makes a big difference !
1 person likes this
@LadyMarissa (12161)
• United States
1 Oct 10
In that context...a BIG difference!!!!
@Monkeyrose (2850)
• Canada
30 Sep 10
I don't know the exact official difference and I think it may be different in different places. I checked online and found this which written by an American lawyer: "The term “person of interest” was coined to mean someone the police cannot currently charge with committing a certain crime but about whom they continue to diligently watch and investigate in order to access the proof they need to either charge them with the crime or at minimum require that they involuntarily answer questions related to the crime." http://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/resources/criminal-defense/criminal-defense-case/person-interest-vs-suspect%C3%A2%C2%97what%C3%A2%C2%92s-differ So according to this it means the same thing but just sounds nicer.
1 person likes this
@LadyMarissa (12161)
• United States
30 Sep 10
Thank you!!! I went to your link & found... A suspect or a “person of interest” is someone the police are likely pretty sure was involved in a crime but about whom they do not yet have the required probable cause to act in any way. I read this to mean that a suspect & a person of interest are the same thing. Maybe as was said above the authorities use the term person of interest to trick them into feeling more comfortable in turning themselves in. I guess that if they're dumb enough to commit the crime, they're dumb enough to fall for this!!!
@pandapig8 (362)
• Philippines
30 Sep 10
I think that a suspect s someone who the police thinks to be the culprit of the crime. I think that a person of interest is someone who could be incorporated into the crime as an accessory to it or as a mastermind, being a person that wasn't in the scene of the crime or wasn't near it at the time. Being a person of interest means you can still roam free but you will be investigated until you are a suspect or convicted if you were really involved. If you are a suspect, tight eyes are thrown at you and they give you boundaries such as you can only go as far as these premise allows and you cannot go anywhere except work and home and groceries. If you do decide to do something else then inform the police because if you do anything suspicious then you are taken into custody :D
1 person likes this
@LadyMarissa (12161)
• United States
30 Sep 10
The legal website listed below states... A suspect or a “person of interest” is someone the police are likely pretty sure was involved in a crime but about whom they do not yet have the required probable cause to act in any way. So, in my opinion, they mean the same thing & are being misrepresented by the local authorities.