Halloween - Coins instead of candy

@Porcospino (18396)
Denmark
November 1, 2010 5:35pm CST
In my country we have a festival called "Fastelavn" and that is similar to Halloween in many ways. The children dress up and they walk from house to house. When the owners of the house open the door the children sing a song (the words are similar to "Trick or treat?") but they don't get candy, they get coins. When I was a child I wasn't allowed to join my friends when they visited the houses in the neighbourhood. My mother always said that dressing up, singing and asking for coins was similar to begging and she didn't want me to participate in the activity. What do you think about this tradition (coins instead of candy)? Would you let your children participate in the activity or would you consider it begging?
8 responses
@BlueGoblin (1833)
• United States
1 Nov 10
Some people do give out coins on Halloween. Usually it is old people that didn't buy candy. Halloween used to be a fun day where you would go to neighbors homes( people that you knew) but now people drive their kids to rich neighborhoods to get more treats. I don't like Halloween to be based on greed. Let the kids dress up and get treats but don't drive them everywhere. Where is the fun in that anyway?
1 person likes this
@2004cqui (2823)
• United States
1 Nov 10
That's parents' greed!
1 person likes this
1 Nov 10
How cost effective is this method anyway? Assuming you live a few miles from the rich neighbourhood to which you'd travel it's going to cost you something not negligible in gasoline. How much extra candy would the kids have to get in the rich neighbourhood compared with what they would get in your own neighbourhood to make the trip worthwhile?
1 person likes this
@peavey (16866)
• United States
1 Nov 10
I don't see that there's any difference in begging for candy or begging for coins. I agree with your mother, by the way. I don't think it's a good thing to teach children. I did let my children go trick or treating on Halloween when they were young, but I've since changed my mind and if I were raising them today, we'd do something else, or nothing at all on that day.
1 person likes this
@Porcospino (18396)
• Denmark
1 Nov 10
When I was a child I was sad that I wasn't allowed to join my friends, but today I understand my mother's thoughts and I know that many people share the same idea. I don't have any children, but if I did I am not sure that I would let them participate. Dressing up and singing is fine, but I don't like the idea of getting paid for it.
@IsisGreen (555)
1 Nov 10
The solution: chocolate coins?
1 person likes this
@Porcospino (18396)
• Denmark
1 Nov 10
I will try that the next time the children show up in front of my door
• Philippines
2 Nov 10
Yeah chocolate coins would definitely do it. It wouldnt be the same with asking for real coins lol. And i think it would be a nice treat.
1 person likes this
@amg5009 (62)
• United States
2 Nov 10
I would allow my children to participate in the Holiday. It sounds like children would have fun and if a lot of children are allowed to do it, then I wouldn't consider it begging. That would be a fun and exciting way for children to make money and it wouldn't rot their teeth like Halloween candy would.
1 person likes this
@maezee (33317)
• United States
1 Nov 10
That's a good idea. Definitely different than the American standard I'm used to, but I'm open minded. I like what the first person said: chocolate coins! LOL!
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@2004cqui (2823)
• United States
1 Nov 10
I never kept my kids from doing a well known function. However, to me it doesn't seem like begging, it's more like bribery, or extortion. "Give me candy or else." Let's not forget the trick part.
1 person likes this
@IsisGreen (555)
1 Nov 10
And I'm surprised. I would have thought Denmark to be more of a 'gifts-in-kind' sort of country.
1 person likes this