I am a budgie!

@p1kef1sh (45640)
December 13, 2010 11:11pm CST
As my quest to eat more healthily continues I find myself investigating seeds whose culinary use has been hitherto unknown to me. Last night I discovered Millet. A seed that can often be found in the budgie's cage. I made up a salad based on cous cous and then added a handful of millet to it. By gum it was crunchy stuff. Only later did I discover that I am supposed to soak it in hot water for 20 minutes first! Have you ever eaten something without learning how to prepare it first?
5 people like this
13 responses
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
22 Dec 10
not me, I read and re-read directions because I'm so unsure about my cooking skills
1 person likes this
@MsTickle (24993)
• Australia
21 Dec 10
Probably. I would expect you to be twittering about now...emphasis on the "twit". (Loved your response to Dawny.)
1 person likes this
• Canada
14 Dec 10
Apparently Hemp seeds are highly nutritious but I don't know if they are low in cholesterol or any of that other stuff. I have heard it touted as an optimal food source, though. Yes, have screwed up many a meal, in learning culinary arts. And I'm sure I'll screw up some more in the future. It is just part of the learning experience. I've also been told that Pumpkin seeds help to prevent prostate cancer.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
14 Dec 10
I always thought that hemp seed was a hallucinogenic. But I'm probably wrong. I didn't know that about pumpkin seed and cancer. Presumably you remove the seed first. LOL.
1 person likes this
• Canada
14 Dec 10
No, hemp is what they use to make rope, clothing, baskets. It has no THC or hallucinogenic qualities whatsoever. Actually, it is also the cheapest, most environmentally friendly ways to grow pulp and paper. Since they grow 8 - 12 feet high, and it is an annual crop.
• Canada
15 Dec 10
I forgot to mention it takes somewhere from 10 - 20 yrs for the pine tree stands they plant and harvest to be big enough to produce enough pulp and paper to be harvested. They create, then destroy and entire ecosystem of animal life, and I think that is more harmful than just harvesting an annual crop. I know some would argue that the trees are environmental, but when you consider that they are only doing it to clear cut the lot in the space of a week, when they are big enough for their purposes, I would say to allow permanent regrowth on a certain percentage to retain the oxygen created by the trees, and replace some of the land with the Hemp plantings.
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
14 Dec 10
A Budgie! Well, if your are becoming an Australian bird, then you will have to start following the Aussies in the Ashes! We need all the support we can get at the moment! Don't let anyone smuggle you if you become a budgie! Do you know what 'Budgie Smugglers' are? Soaking nuts and seeds does make them easier to digest and they are also healthier if you soak them first. Soaking them starts the sprouting process, which releases enzymes which were locked inside the seed until the soaking process. I am not sure about soaking in hot water, this might harm the enzymes. I normally soak my nuts in cool water!
@p1kef1sh (45640)
14 Dec 10
I have no idea what a "Budgie Smuggler" is but I do know that Australia, or rather your cricket team needs some help. Maybe they could all try soaking their nuts too! LOL.
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
15 Dec 10
Budgie Smuggler - Any item of male bathing costume or underwear that encloses the wearer's genitalia in a manner that resembles the concealment of a budgerigar.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
15 Dec 10
I am now investigating a noise from my nether regions that sounds like "who's a pretty boy"!
@gabs8513 (48715)
• United Kingdom
18 Dec 10
Oh yes many a time lol but that is just me I never look before I cook lol
@p1kef1sh (45640)
18 Dec 10
I try to follow the recipe but sometimes I just don't see what's written on the page Gabs. LOL
@Hatley (164485)
• Garden Grove, California
23 Dec 10
oh speaking of not seeing whats written on the page did me in at9 when I was making a birthday cake for my mom. I should have put in three teaspoonfuls of baking powder but wind flipped he page to a different recipe. oh oh the taste. horrible so bitter. the adults all ate it ans said what a wonderful baker you are,I knew better, they were just trying to make me feel good.light as feather and bitter as wormwood. my dad did not eat any as he felt cakes should not be lavendar. he he
@Hatley (164485)
• Garden Grove, California
23 Dec 10
thats odd I wrote wind flipped the page to a different recipe and I added a half cup of baking powder. now why did that get cut off, second timed I have had a discussion come with a sentence left out?
@GreenMoo (11842)
15 Dec 10
Hee hee! I like serving barley to my guests, but I have to sneak it out of the bag in the chicken shed under cover of darkness. It´s hard to find barley in our local supermarkets, but the feed salesman sell it in 40kg bags :-)
@p1kef1sh (45640)
15 Dec 10
Your guests much like their barley if they manage 40kg of it! Big bowls too. LOL.
@GreenMoo (11842)
15 Dec 10
With a little help from the chickens!
@catdla1 (6005)
• United States
14 Dec 10
Do budgies actually eat the millet? Most bird seed mixes contain it, but most birds won't eat it. Mostly (at my feeders anyway) they push it up and over the edges so that they can reach the other various seeds and nuts in the mix. They seem to dislike the red millet more than the white. I get lots of millet seedlings in my flower garden, giving me plenty to weed out throughout the spring. Whenever I go to ethnic restaurants, I eat things that I wouldn't have a clue how to make. I like it that way, because if my husband gets a hankering for something like that, we have to go out to eat. In that respect, sometimes ignorance does pay...lol.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
15 Dec 10
I don't know if they eat it but I do know that my aunt bred budgerigars and canaries and bought tons of the stuff. I once ate something that looked and tasted like an old dish cloth on a Polynesian restaurant. I wonder if Poly was a budgie!
1 person likes this
@catdla1 (6005)
• United States
15 Dec 10
I'm not sure, but I bet she was surprised when she realized that she was scrubbing the pots with some one's dinner. And scratched her head wondering where the dish cloth went!
@jerzgirl (8030)
• Gloucester City, New Jersey
14 Dec 10
It wasn't preparation I didn't know, but how to eat what I learned about. We went to a Chinese restauant that served a bowl of edamame. I'd heard of it but had never seen them to know that you didn't eat them with the pod on, which is how they were served. I quickly learned the pods aren't edible. But, I also learned that edamame are very good!!
@p1kef1sh (45640)
14 Dec 10
LoL. I wonder if you can make soup from the pods? You can from pea pods.
@dawnald (84146)
• Shingle Springs, California
14 Dec 10
give peas a chance...
@dawnald (84146)
• Shingle Springs, California
14 Dec 10
Well there was the sausage the mother-in-law left. I tried to cook it and it pretty much disintegrated...
@p1kef1sh (45640)
14 Dec 10
Sounds like the wurst thing you did that day!
1 person likes this
@dawnald (84146)
• Shingle Springs, California
14 Dec 10
Dawn flips the budgie the bird, makes some comment about senses of humor going to seed, and flaps off to bed...
@Hatley (164485)
• Garden Grove, California
23 Dec 10
hi pikey just when I thought all the discussions were boring giggle giggle oh yes garbanza beans and I did cook them but had never used them before. My poor hubby was having problems with his fakse teetg abtwat and crunchy beans was not very welcomed.Soi next time I soaked them in warm water and they seemed better but still very frim. I think if you cooked those things for an hour theywould still be a very firm bean.They are very good for you and the taste is okay but they gave me a jawache from chewing.lol lol lol. oh and tilaphia fish,you cannot cook them but just a very few minutes otherwise you have a fish stew, the flesh falls to pieces like a fish paste.very delicate flavot. they were pretty expensive to have them dissolve when frying. wow. oh on the subject of seeds they are a no no to me along with nuts. I do eat nuts 'but am leery of seeds. I do not want to end up again in the ospital with bleeding diverticulitis. It took 4 blood transfusions before the bleeding stopped.all on account of a handful of ripe delicious blackberry,innocent little seeds clogged up a little diverticuliti and sliced an artery open, wow,
@Hatley (164485)
• Garden Grove, California
23 Dec 10
errors fakse is false teetg is teeth abtwat think it was supposed to be about then sorry forgot to proof it.
17 Dec 10
Hi P1key, Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha!!! aren't you tweet! poor P1key, I just experiment with food to see how it turns out but never cooked or ate a handful of millet, I thought you can't eat them, now there, I learnt something new. I hope you teeth are ok, lol! hugs. Tamara
@p1kef1sh (45640)
17 Dec 10
Teeth are fine but I haven't tried it again yet. XXXX
@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
14 Dec 10
I have always read the instructions on new foods first but I remember making some mush (polenta for the snobs! ) a couple of years ago. I kind of new how it was made but had never made it myself, just watched my mother and grandmother make it. Mush is corn meal mainly, and you fry it in bacon grease and serve it with syrup and it's yummy!! Of course, I didn't use bacon grease because we all know better these days and I used sugarless syrup. It wasn't as good as my mother's but nonetheless it was tasty and brought back nice memories of hot mush on cold winter mornings! I have also undercooked brown rice and decided I didn't like it before I recently found out I had not cooked it enough. I hope you try the millet again!
@p1kef1sh (45640)
14 Dec 10
I am not a polenta fan but can imagine the fun on making it. I shan't be making the mistake of eating it raw again!!
@veganbliss (3901)
• Adelaide, Australia
20 Dec 10
Bravo you! Either way you go, you can't do any lasting harm if it's vegan. Millet comes from South America, it's native to that region. The macrobiotic diet is very particular about eating grains that only come from the region you're living in. Let's see if I can remember them. Australians are best suited to eating wheat, Asians have rice, Buckwheat is meant for Russians, Corn for Americans, Barley if you come from Britain, Oats for the Irish & Rye for the Germans! Millet is very yin & is meant for much warmer climates. It has never really agreed with me. I go better on rice, like my Asian neighbours, & am gluten-intolerant, even before becoming veg*n. I've read that before boiling millet, one is supposed to brown it slightly in a frying pan (dry). I've read that all other grains should be soaked for a minimum of 12 hours to eliminate enzyme inhibitors (limits protein absorbtion)& phytic acid (limits vitamin & mineral absorbtion). Sprouting is even better & increases a grain's protein content by up to 300% & vitamin & mineral content by up to 1000%. Yes we all have our own stories of a shaky start & my story is little different. The important thing is to make that start & stick with it. Oh, if I might add, using a pressure cooker not only keeps all the nutrients in, but halves cooking time into the bargain. Also when boiling millet, one must be sure to keep the lid off (those gasses are actually poisonous!) & drain any scum or foam that forms on top. Hope this helps