Babies; too hot vs too cold

December 21, 2010 2:28pm CST
When my youngest was born in September, the pediatrician told me it was very important to keep her warm as she was a tiny baby. Then I read the cot death leaflets which all warn against letting babies get too hot. How do you know if you're getting the right temperature? And how to maintain it? Its freezing cold here at the moment (South-East England) so I have the heating on most of the time, but sometimes I check on the baby and she is sweating from the heat, while other times, particularly at night, she feels cold to the touch and I have to poke her to make sure she's alive!
4 responses
@Pitgull (1523)
• United States
21 Dec 10
The more information people come across, the more difficult it becomes to know which way is up or what we are supposed to do. For example, is it good to drink ginger tea? Well, yes...but more than a cup a day can damage your lungs. Life seems to demand a happy medium. When it comes to keeping your baby at the right temperature, I think it is important to remember we are all different and have different needs. My boyfriend runs hotter than I do, and needs it much cooler to regulate his body temperature--but it can freeze me up fast. From my experience as the eldest sibling, and a babysitter, I would suggest catering your environment to your baby. If her skin is too warm to the touch, then you should cool it down. Try montitoring the temperature--both at times she is sweating, and when she is cold. It would also help by including the times, too. This way, you know what time of day she needs it warmer--and when she needs it cooler. After a few weeks, you should be able to find the right temperature for her--based on her personal requirements. Good luck, and I hope you all stay warm--but not too hot!
21 Dec 10
Thanks for the response, I have found myself getting up in the night to turn the heating on or off, depending on how warm the baby feels. I think I may end up waking every hour just to check until she is big enough not to worry about it!
@dorannmwin (36695)
• United States
22 Dec 10
My main instinct is that a mother knows whether or not their child is comfortable. I remember when my children were little, I would layer them in clothes so that I could take a layer off of them if they felt like they were getting too warm while we were away from the house. Then, at night I would always put them in a blanket sleeper to sleep but nothing other than that unless it was particularly cold and then I would put a onesie on under their sleeper. Of course we didn't use blankets for them for the longest time.
@magrylouyu (1632)
• United States
22 Dec 10
My oldest daughter was born in Febuary. I was always wondering if she was too hot or too cold myself. I was told by many people to keep it comforable in the house. At night time keep the thermstat around 68-70 degrees. I would put a light weight sleeper on her and then swaddler her and put a recieving blanket over her. When she got too old to swaddle I would put a heavier sleeper on her with a blanket. Like another person said just trust you motherly insticts. You know your baby better then anybody else ever will. All anybody can do is offer advice. Just dress your baby as you would yourself to be comfortable or you could put on a onsie underneath her jammies as well.
@deedee328 (1127)
• United States
22 Dec 10
My oldest son was born in December and I had the same concern you have. The pediatrician told me that I should consider whether I was comfortable. If I was, then, so would the baby. It sounded a little crazy to me because we tend to think that babies are more delicate than we, but it worked for us. If it was cool enough for me to wear a sweater out, then I put one on my baby. If it were too hot in the house for me, he was sweating. My second son was born in April and he has asthma, so the pediatrician told me to keep him between 60 and 70 degrees all the time. It worked for him. I think in the end, you just have to trust your instincts. A mother's instincts are always better than anyone else's advice concerning your baby.