Pronunciation confusions with the English Language

Calgary, Alberta
January 5, 2011 4:43pm CST
I know many people here doesn't speak English as their first language, so here is a topic we people who have English as second language can talk and relate about. I didn't struggle much with speaking English but I do have issues with punctuation and spelling(sometimes its only typo though) But when it comes to speaking it, You will be thinking your talking to some dumb surfer dude from California, I know it sounds weird but it has something to do with my raspy voice, Call center background and exposure to American pop culture in my childhood. In my country people really struggle in pronunciations due to thick accent but it is still understandable. Most Filipinos confuses the letter "P" to letter "F" and the letter "V" and letter "B". There is also a struggle with a hard "T" and a "TH" I notice Japanese people sometimes confuse Letter R to Letter L. They also have tendencies to add U to some foreign words. Like I remember a guy named Douglas, In a Japanese gameshow and they called him Dog-Ra-su, Then they refer the Superhero Miss Marvel as Missu Mah-Vuh-ru. What are your usual pronunciation struggle when you speak in English.. hi bubblews admins -------------- If your American,British,Australian,Kiwi and Canadian, What are your common pronunciation struggle with Foreign language words?
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5 responses
@rage35 (344)
• Philippines
8 Jan 11
If the language you're trying to speak with isn't your native language, then it will be difficult for you to pronounce it well. Since the diction doesn't follow your mouth's diction. It is very difficult. I'm not an English speaker but I understand the language and can write in a good manner. I also experience having difficulties in pronunciation when I was facing a foreigner who's a native English speaker. It's is really hard to speak and communicate on other foreign languages.
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• Calgary, Alberta
8 Jan 11
It use to be my Job to talk to Americans on Phone, I can talk to them but yeah nothing beats speaking your own language. There is a freedom and ease. We dont need to worry on what we are about to say. What are the words you struggle to pronounce?
@rage35 (344)
• Philippines
8 Jan 11
Hmm. I don't know exactly what are those words I've struggle to pronounce.lol...but still practicing makes perfect.
• Calgary, Alberta
8 Jan 11
Uber long Englishwords were hard to pronounce, Like Anthropomorphic which is a term for animal characters that acts human (like the ones from fables)then there is a word called antidisestablishmentarianism, I cant pronounce that thing but I know what it means. Then the term useless have this synonym: floccinaucinihilipilification.. I think I can pronounce words that is not that long.
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• Philippines
7 Jan 11
As you know, I'm also a Filipino. I grew up watching American cartoons, movies, & TV shows. I'm not much of a speaker though. I just spoke the language when needed at school and I remember during English classes that we sometimes had an entire class dedicated to reading along with a tape. I don't know if you've used or heard of it, it's the "Spoken in English" book and we just read sets of drills throughout a class. I really disliked speaking English because I really love our own language. I remember in grade 6 when there was a Speak English policy. I was the "collector". For every Tagalog word spoken, I will charge them 1 peso. It was very contradictory because I dislike the policy as well. When there are no teachers around and we're in the canteen, I tell them to just go ahead and speak Filipino and I won't charge them, lol In 2009, I tried applying at a call center. I admit I wasn't really prepared when I was applying. I was asked by the interviewer to read a set of sentences. She said I had problems with p and f and I'm like hell no. I sing a lot of foreign songs for leisure and I encounter Fs a lot. She also told me my "th"e was hard. Does she not know that it's supposed to be pronounced that way? Anywho, I tried to apply for a free call center course later that year because it was free. The "assessor" told me I had no problems with p and f. It's just that I may not have enunciated it well/loud enough for the call center interviewer to hear. Speaking of foreign songs, my favorite would be Japanese songs. They have an F and that's why I was surprised that call center interviewer said I had problems with it. I've been singing Japanese songs for 10 years during that time. On another note, it's not really their tendency to add U's. It's because their "letters" are all syllables and so they sometimes have U's when not needed. Hahaha, I've been singing Japanese for so long that I believe I said Engrish one time or two. Oh, and on another note, the Japanese sometimes pronounce F like it's an H. It's like saying F but the tongue is not touching the teeth.
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• Philippines
7 Jan 11
Just to add to their F, I meant the upper teeth is not touching the lower lip, and it's almost like the soft "th" and this is the part with the tongue not touching the teeth. Silly me.
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• Calgary, Alberta
8 Jan 11
other stuff Filipinos struggle in applying to call centers. When the latter is in the middle of the word, It should be removed. As in Mountainshould be pronounced as "Moun uhnn"Filipinos will pronounced that as MAWNteyn Words with double T in the middle like Betty,Jetty,getty, Kitty and Witty, Pinoys pronounced it with T, The truth is, it should be pronounced as double D. I hope I get promoted again, I want to be an accent coach so bad, Quality assurance Job is awesome compared to receiving calls but that Job is listening and monitoring calls. I'm so tired of calls and stressful conversations. I sing Japanese songs too, specially the anime and videogame themes, they were better than the songs we see in the charts.
@ckyera (17261)
• Philippines
6 Jan 11
hi again capt! well sometimes i also have a problem with f & p, V & B but it only happens when i am talking fast, and sometimes i have a tendency of eating words! lol! tongue twisters is a big help for me in improving. these days since i am living in the visayas region, i also have a tendency of using o for u and e for i, something like that, but then again it don't happen all the time.
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• Calgary, Alberta
8 Jan 11
Nowadays i noticed some Visayan people, specially those people from Cebu, Speaks English really well, Its so close to American accent but when they speak Tagalog...It shines through were they came from. But they should not be ashamed of their accents. Russians and Latinos are proud of their accents that people found it sexy. MY mom and dad can differentiate the pronunciation differences between Ipod and Ipad
@ckyera (17261)
• Philippines
8 Jan 11
yeah yeah, i agree that cebuanos manage english really well, its just that sometimes ith people from other region, they might sound different and yes when it comes to tagalog their natural comes out. i think most cebuanos actually prefer english than tagalog (just an opinion and based on what i am hearing...)
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@Hatley (164524)
• Garden Grove, California
8 Jan 11
hi albertshisker As ah American when I was studying Spanish I was forever messing up on the r'as you had to roll them in some instances and so I would make the words all wrong and now that its been years since I took Spanish in college'I can read a lot of it but speaking its really a chore and of course most of the care givers here are Mexican and too they do not really speak the kind of Spanish I was taught either. And French always threw me with the leaving out of so manyletters again I can still read some French but cannot really speak it. it correctly.
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• Calgary, Alberta
8 Jan 11
French confuses me a lot specially when they turn letter s to silent or sometimes to letter Y. I can only read a few of their words. I remember I get to like a French Canadian song and I wanted to sing it so bad because the melody is beautiful. Whoa, they were not pronounced as how they written. I was a slow talker when I speak Spanish since I spend less time in Peru in my lifetime. I also cant read the names of Icelandic people. LOL
@thesids (22358)
• Bhubaneswar, India
6 Jan 11
Hi Captain, I miss out their jokes, satires, slang and also find it difficult to get the right word to express myself the correct way... As for pronunciations - here at my place there is no V and it is replaced with B or Bh. Same for Sh they have just one S for that. But I have no such pronunciation issues, spelling mistakes - at times yes, if I write on pen and paper. Cheers, theSids.
• Calgary, Alberta
8 Jan 11
I notice many Indians are able to fake Brittish accent, I think it has something to do with colonization and Indians have more time with Britons than Americans. I tried faking British accent before, I think its doable but the accents I cant do are the following: Southern Accent(Alabama,Texas etc.) Scottish Accent-I really cant figure it out Irish Accent- Has similarities with British but When i tried imitating Scottish Accent. and the hardest would be the African American accent- They developed an accent of their own that I cant imitate. ------ Back to pronunciations, I forgot in my country the letter "a" is pronounced as "ahh" so some people here struggles on how words with "A" is pronounced.