Was spanish a mandatory class in your high school?

@shaggin (25202)
United States
February 4, 2011 11:13am CST
When you were in high school was Spanish a class that you were forced to take? In our school if you were going to college you had to take Spanish. The teachers tried to get us to think we had to take the class no matter what but I found out that it is only required if you want to get into college and I knew I wasent going to be going to college so I refused to take the class. The spanish teacher in our school was such a boring nerd I am so glad I didnt have his class.
3 people like this
17 responses
@CarlHalling (3629)
• United Kingdom
5 Feb 11
I never went to High School because I'm from the UK, but when I was at college (Naval/Military), the only mandatory language was French. I'm not sure how much Spanish is taught in schools today; but from what I have gathered, German is also quite an important language in terms of what is taught today in school. But traditionally in the UK, French has always been the big one, after English of course. I myself studied Spanish (as well as French) at post-compulsory level; but that was by personal choice; it was not mandatory.
1 person likes this
@shaggin (25202)
• United States
17 Feb 11
Why did you not go to high school? Did you drop out? I am very confused by this. You said its because you are from the UK. Do they not have high schools there at all? Some schools have elementary schools, middle schools and high schools but when I was in school we just had a elementary school and high school. We went through all the same grades is just we didnt go to seperate buildings. The middle school was just part of the elementary school.
• United Kingdom
17 Feb 11
No, they don't have high schools here in the UK. We just have primary schools and secondary schools, of which there are several types, some private, some not. Compulsory education finishes at 16, at which point a person can either leave the educational system and find work, or go on to non-compulsory higher education.
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
17 Feb 11
Wow that is very interesting. Here we have kindergarten, then first grade through 12th grade. After we finish 12th grade we graduate and can either go to work or college. 16 is very young to be done with school and move onto college. I was considered young for my grade. I was 17 when I graudated pretty much everyone else graduated at 18.
• United States
13 Feb 11
We had to take a foreign language and we were offered French, German, Latin or Spanish. I opted for Latin, which I never regretted, because it made learning every other language so much easier. At the time I didn't know I would have to take French, German, Italian, and Czech! Thank goodness my Latin grammar kept me afloat or I would have failed miserably.
@shaggin (25202)
• United States
14 Feb 11
Thats neat that you had so many choices to choose from in your school. All we had was spanish. Ours was a very small school though I'm sure thats why. Are you actually fluent in french, german, italian, and czech or did you just have to take the classes and do good enough to pass? I cant imagine having to learn more then one language that would be so hard to keep them all straight. If you are fluent in all those I am truly amazed at your brilliance!
• United States
16 Feb 11
I'm fluent in French and can get around in Italian and Czech (if you dropped me off in that country I could rent an apartment, order at a restaurant, buy stuff at the store, etc.). I love German and I am part German ancestry but I have real difficulties with the language. In 1994 I was trying to buy a ticket from a machine in a train station in Austria, and if some Italians hadn't come along, I guess I would be there still. ;) I actually ended up living in all those countries, so it wasn't a bad deal, and I still have friends there and plan to visit again in a few years when the economy improves! I think the thing that really made my life easier in learning languages was a course I took in introductory linguistics, in which each day we were given a page of a language we had never seen before, three translated sample sentences, and a glossary, and we had to come up with at least ten different (and correct) grammar rules for each language. Thanks to that course, even though I can speak only a dozen or so words of a lot of different languages ("please," "thank you," "sorry, I'm a stupid American," etc.), I can tell you a lot about how certain languages (Arabic and Farsi, for example) work. We had almost 3,000 people in my high school so obviously they had to offer more choices.
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
20 Feb 11
I'm not sure how many students were in our high school. Each grade had less then 100 kids in it and in our high school we had 7th-12th grade so there would have been approximately 600 kids in our high school. Wow that is crazy then that you had 3000 in your school. It must have been huge.
@sacmom (14338)
• United States
14 Feb 11
No, it wasn't mandatory, but I did take it as an elective back in 9th grade. My sister had taken it in high school and convinced me to do the same, so I did. However, with all the school I skipped that year I hardly learned a thing! Though even if I'd gone I probably wouldn't have learned much Spanish anyway as the teacher was into making origami! LOL Happy mylotting!
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
14 Feb 11
Well the origami making is cool but I dont know what that has to do with teaching students spanish lol. That is something that the chinese do I believe. That belongs in art class not spansih class. I never really skipped school but my senior year I was kicked out of school more then I was allowed in school lol. Needless to say I was a bad teen and I hated school.
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@sacmom (14338)
• United States
15 Feb 11
LOL! Me too! I hated it so much it's amazing I graduated at all! LOL
@bounce58 (17550)
• Canada
9 Feb 11
When I went to school, my batch was actually the first that didn't have to take Spanish anymore. I've heard horror stories from higher batches about how difficult the teacher, and the class was. I was so glad that we didn't have to take it. It was one less thing to worry. Although now, I wish I'd learned it. It could be very beneficial in the industry that I am in.
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
23 Feb 11
Its funny how we think we will never use the things we learned in school in real life but then down the road we do usually use the knowledge they taught us. Well I didnt pay much attention in school so I didnt learn very much lol. That doesnt help me very much in life though.
@dorannmwin (36651)
• United States
8 Feb 11
When I was in high school, we weren't required to take Spanish to graduate. We had to take at least two years of a foreign language. That said, I did opt to take Spanish because it was the language that I thought had the most practical use based on where I live. That said, I took Spanish from the time that I was in seventh grade until the time that I was in 10th grade. I don't know that I could get by in a Spanish speaking country, but I would do okay with a Spanish speaking individual in my area.
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
8 Feb 11
Well thats good that you could at least speak with a spanish speaking person living in america. I couldnt even do that. I cant speak a word of any other language. In our school it was just one year of a language and since there was only one language option it was Spanish that everyone took.
@LeighB (700)
• Thailand
5 Feb 11
When I was at school we had no choice but to take French. Most of us would fight to sit at the back of the class so that we could fall asleep or get on with our homework from previous classes. When it came to exam time - A level - The exam was optional, which resulted in nearly the whole year opting NOT to sit the exam. Now a days, kids have a choice at school with languages. They can now take - French, Spanish or German - how things change. They are even now contemplating bringing in Chinese studies as the World seems to be shrinking very quickly.
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
20 Feb 11
I would have skipped the exam to if it was only optional. I suppose the people who chose to take it were the ones who knew french really well and knew they would get a good grade so it would help them. But if you take the test and you fail it miserably that would just lower your total grade.
@asyria51 (2870)
• United States
5 Feb 11
We had to take two years of a language. We had the choice of Latin(private catholic school), French or Spanish. I took four years of spanish in high school and another year and a half in college. It has come in handy the last few years as the migrant workers move through my farming community.
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
20 Feb 11
Wow you must be very fluent in spanish if you had taken it for 5 1/2 years in total. That is really awesome that you stuck with it so long. The only one I know who did anything like that in our school was my exes cousin she went on to go to spain to be a exchange student. Usually our school got foreign exchange students which was really neat but no one usually left our school as a foreign exchange student in another country. Being able to speak another language would be very handy. I can only speak english.
@EdnaReyes (2628)
• Philippines
5 Feb 11
It was mandatory to have Spanish class in college but now, it was only an elective for Language Studies. On my part, I have to finished a 12 units of Spanish before completing and graduating . It was also boring but luckily our Spanish prof was a handsome guy and this makes up for the boredom and lost of interest in the subject.
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
15 Feb 11
I know that if I was to go to college I would have had to take a language in order to enroll. So its a good thing I never wanted to go to college or I would have had to take the spanish class in school. Thats awesome your spanish professor was handsome. Our spanish teacher in high school was the puniest little nerd. Ugh so gross lol.
@madteaparty (2763)
• Japan
5 Feb 11
No, in my country we have to take English as a foreign language in school. Spanish is the second language more widely spoken in the World, so I don't really understand why didn't you want to take it. I suposse that, like most of native English speakers, you wrongly think that English is enough to move all over the world, but in many countries English is not spoken and Spanish is spoken instead, so being able to communicate in both languages is a big advantage
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@shaggin (25202)
• United States
5 Feb 11
Yes if I wanted to move all over the world I would obviously need to learn another language to be able to speak to people who dont speak english. I dont plan to ever leave this country so I'm not worried about it. If I knew another language though I might be able to get hired for having that quality. I hated school I would have tried to get out of any classes I could have lol Spanish class was one that they couldnt force me to take so I didnt. If math had been optional I would have skipped that class to I was horrible at math.
• Philippines
20 Feb 11
It wasn't mandatory in my high school. it was like some 50 years ago when it was removed from our curriculum. But in college, some courses have spanish class in their curriculum, especially those involved with tourism, international relations, and teaching.
@sender621 (14956)
• United States
5 Feb 11
When i was in high school, foreign languages classes were an elective. they were an option for us to take. They were not mandatory classes. French, Spanish and German classes were offered at different grade levels. Foreign language classes were a great opportunity. Taking French classes was sometimes the highlight of my school day.
• United States
5 Feb 11
In Indiana, it is required for students to take some form of foreign language. In my school, however, the only language they taught was Spanish. Students could take the immensely out dated language of ancient Greek if they chose, but they had to at least take one class of Spanish first. I don't know if only students who are getting the Core 40 diploma are required to take foreign language, because no one at my school was ever allowed to graduate high school without going to College.
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@doggydimon (1379)
• Philippines
5 Feb 11
I remember when I was in grade 6, our school used to teach Spanish in 4th year high school. But when I was to step into high school, they decided to scrap Spanish and put in a new subject which is Calculus. hahaha... Back then I didn't know if I will be happy or sad. Sad, because Calculus is quite a hard subject and Happy because for me Spanish is quite boring.
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@stk40m (1119)
• Koeln, Germany
4 Feb 11
although I'm from Germany it might be interesting to note that in secondary school English was mandatory and later we had to choose between Latin and French. I took Latin but I regretted it later on because of the grammar. Nevertheless many years after school I began to develop an interest in languages and so I first started teaching French to myself and a couple of years later Spanish as well. I'm not at the point that I could write French or Spanish without much trouble but I'm able to read texts in both languages without much effort.
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@choybel (5059)
• Philippines
4 Feb 11
There wasn't a required Spanish class in my high school but I heard my elder sister and all the rest before her had one even in college. This was because our country was once under Spanish colony and it has became a part of the curriculum until revised just lately. Our native dialect in our town is in fact a mixture of Mexican and Spanish language with a touch of Tagalog, this is probably why we can understand Spanish a bit and vice-versa. It is even called broken Spanish by most.
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@kingparker (9698)
• United States
2 Jun 11
I end up taking Spanish class in high school since it is mandatory to go to college indeed. There other options too besides Spanish, you can take Latin, French, or German, etc.... Any foreign languages available in the chart. For me, Spanish wasn't hard at all, it is that I need more practice for it. It was fun, and it is educational anyway.
@ebuscat (5949)
• Philippines
5 Feb 11
For me not because we are not Spanish culture English is the first.