Red tape and laws

@p1kef1sh (45640)
February 27, 2011 1:54am CST
I was reading about someone's issue with her tyres recently and started to think about how difficult it is to buy a car in the UK. Let's focus on secondhand cars. In the UK you must first find the car and agree a price. The car must be registered with the Driver Vehicle Licencing Agency; have a valid MOT certificate - this is an annual roadworthiness check; have valid insurance of at least third party I.e if you hit someone you can pay for their damage; the tyres must have at least 1.6mm across 75% of width of the tyre. Finally, you must have a valid driving licence for the class of vehicle that you buy. Only once these matters are correct is the car able to be driven away. How demanding is the law on car purchase where you live.
4 people like this
16 responses
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
27 Feb 11
lessee, you have to have title of the auto...
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
That's all? No road legal requirements?
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
27 Feb 11
no, you can buy a piece of junk (and I do mean that literally) and make it road legal, but if you are expecting to take it on the road, then buy one that is already passed inspection and the like. To get the title transferred I think you have to show you have insurance, but not exactly for that car.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
27 Feb 11
I know things have changed a lot, but not tons since this time... But in the early 1980's I lived in a rent house that had a (falling down) garage in the back and IN the garage were the shells of 2 VW bugs. But, because I didn't have the titles, I couldn't even get a junk car guy to tow them away for scrap (no, I wasn't asking money, just to get rid of the junk.)
1 person likes this
@yoyo1198 (3643)
• United States
27 Feb 11
I'm in the U.S. I've bought several autos. We must have a valid driver's license and proof of insurance and I think that is all. It's up to the buyer to choose an automobile that is road worthy and has a CarFax certificate.
1 person likes this
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
How do they define "roadworthy"?
1 person likes this
@yoyo1198 (3643)
• United States
27 Feb 11
I suppose it varies from person to person. I would want it to have decent tires, noise-free, clean engine with proof of regular maintenance, and respectable gas mileage. Not a clunker. Some people are satisfied with a vehicle that will get them from point A to point B. Some states require emission control check-ups yearly with that proof being a sticker on the windshield.
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
27 Feb 11
We are similar here to your laws, but we do not have to have the correct licence in order to buy a car that I am aware of. There are only two classes of car licence, manual or automatic, but you can still buy either car I think, just not legally drive it. When I got my licence though, there was only one type of licence. You could do your test in either. Our roadworthy checks include tyre thickness, but I am not sure if there is an actual measurement or if they just do it by eye. Some states require cars to get a roadworthy every year with their registration renewal, but I have never had to do that where I have lived. 3rd party insurance is compulsory with the registration of a car here too.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
I should have phrased myself better. Anyone can buy any vehicle but if you want to drive it on the road then you require the appropriate licence. I can ride a motorbike, car (manual or automatic although we have tests for both and if you have an automatic licence you cannot drive a manual without the appropriate test), and trucks up 4 tons. Anything larger requires a separate test as do diggers and fork lift trucks!
@RawBill1 (8542)
• Gold Coast, Australia
27 Feb 11
Ok. Pretty much the same as here then. We can drive light trucks up to about that weight too. I have friends who are younger that only have an automatic licence, would not even know how to drive a manual! That is too restricting in my opinion. I have a motorbike licence too as well as a boat one. I have not had a motorbike for over ten years though, but I nearly bought one two weeks ago! I went for my first ride in years on a friends BMW GS650 that she was selling cheap and I was going to buy it, but then she decided not to sell it!
@SViswan (12071)
• India
1 Mar 11
It's the easiest thing here(atleast in the city I am in) to get a car or a driving license even....if one has the money. No one checks anything if you grease their hands! I read about a recent survey where 90% of the responders had no clue of road signals despite driving for more than 15 years!! A few of them didn't know about the registration of a vehicle (which is very easy to get done).
@p1kef1sh (45640)
1 Mar 11
I have heard it said that in some countries one person acquires a driving licence and the rest of the family use it! I have been driven in India but never driven myself. It was mad! Give way to anything bigger than you and to cows!
@catdla1 (6005)
• United States
28 Feb 11
Here in Oklahoma we have most of that...in theory anyway. Cars are supposed to be registered and have insurance. We have no MOT or safety inspections. The only problem is that the license plate (or tag) for the vehicle doesn't stay with the driver as cars are bought and sold (the sticker on the plate 'proves' registration and insurance), but stay with the car. So in practice, I could buy a car from someone who has valid insurance, etc., and drive it for a year without getting any myself. In states where the tag follows the driver, as the car is sold, the plate comes off of it, forcing the new owner to get his/her own. Isn't that odd? Or are other places like that, too?
@p1kef1sh (45640)
28 Feb 11
I've seen Oklahoma. I don't recall Howard Keel even having a car. It's all about surreys with fringes on top.... LOL. Here insurance is personal and you can transfer the outstanding value to your new car. Or try for a refund of the unused balance.
@elitess (5072)
• Ipswich, England
28 Feb 11
Pikey beware ! I might very well ask you questions about various aspects of the UK laws regarding cars, homes, renting or others as moving there is far from easy, or moving in any other country then your own. And i guess even thinking of all that you believe is enough, the unexpected will still hit you pretty fast :). Well not having a license i don't know the exact laws of buying a car here in Romania, but i can tell you this: You can buy a car here, and most of just you said is optional - but preferred to have the car be registered in Romania, maybe even your city, be recently checked by the auto car registry (equivalent to your MOT i think). Cheers mate.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
28 Feb 11
Now that Romania is part of the EU I would imagine that they are tightening things up dramatically. Ask me any questions you want. I'll do my best to give you the answers or direct you in the right direction.
• United States
27 Feb 11
Here so as long as you have a valid drivers license and the mandatory liability insurance any car is good to go so as long as it passed the emission testing and by that there are many ways "some" can get away with that portion of it. As a jalopy may be someone's limo.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
28 Feb 11
With the current cost of fuel that jalopy costs as much to run as a limo too! Almost $9 a gallon here!
27 Feb 11
Hi P!key, I suppose its for your protection and safty for all that but I am glad I don't drive, couldn't afford it anyway, but hub has to put up with that as he has a car but mostley cycle everywhere when he is on his own. Hugs. Tamara xxxx
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
I am tempted by the idea of cycling Tamara. But I am not sure that I am brave enough! LOL. XXXX
@jerzgirl (8027)
• Gloucester City, New Jersey
27 Feb 11
I'm assuming your MOT is our inspection certificate. We must provide proof of license and insurance, but the inspection can't be done until the plates are received from registration. Most dealers guarantee a vehicle will pass inspection. I fact, it used to be the law in this state; but now if they say "as is", you're on your own. It may or may not pass. If it doesn't pass, you have 30 days to repair it so it will.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
Yes, the MOT is exactly that. I think that it depends on the state. Yours sounds more thorough than some others.
• Regina, Saskatchewan
27 Feb 11
We go to a car lot, kick a few tyres, take a few test drives and then sign over our children's futures in blood on the dotted line and drive away. Simple. Oh, and yeah we have to have proof of insurance (at least liability), but we register the titles ourselves for a fee.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
Insurance is a must here - but if you don't have any of the other road legal stuff then they can and do decline to pay out.
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Feb 11
I bought my first car 40 years ago in Germany after having taken a driving course, passed the test successfully. I then purchased a second hand VW which was my pride and joy. I had quite a few stickers on the back not just for decoration but to cover all the rust holes!! I had it for two year with no problems. Here in the States seemingly all it takes to buy a car is money, credit and a drivers license.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
VWs have always had a good reputation. But they can be expensive to maintain when they start to go wrong!
@dragon54u (31634)
• United States
27 Feb 11
There are no laws here! Or very few. You can buy a used car anytime you like and it's up to you to make sure it runs well and is roadworthy. I can sell a car to my neighbor that is about to break down and he'll have very little recourse when it does--it's up to him to have the car checked out before he buys it. Consumers don't have much protection here in the U.S. when they buy a used car. And you can drive on bald tires if you want to take the chance, nobody cares.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
I often wonder whether there's be much popular support for a consumer protection society with teeth in the US. I hear of so many being ripped off and being largely unable to do anything much about it.
@BarBaraPrz (20503)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
27 Feb 11
I've never bought a car, so I don't really know, but I can guess there are restrictions in place here, too.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
There have been many occasions when I wish that I didn't own a car. But an equal number when I am pleased that I do.
1 person likes this
@GreenMoo (11842)
27 Feb 11
It's even worse than in the UK, because when you buy it you must attend an office in person. Once you get there there is invariably some fine to pay due to some error on the seller's part (last time I got clobbered for a fine as the previous seller hadn't had it taxed). Then when you sell it you have nightmares unless you frogmarch the buyer to the office and stand over him to make sure he does the paperwork right. Because if he doesn't you remain responsible for the car. Do I sound all sort of bitter here? Hmmm ... perhaps that's because there's a car out there somewhere in my name. Oh, and the insurers won't cancel your insurance unless you can prove that you've sold it or scrapped it, even though you don't have to have insurance if it's parked up off the road on your land somewhere. I suspect though that this was my insurance company being deliberately difficult in order to hang onto the cash of a poor naive foreigner. And don't even get me started on the fun of having a UK registered car in Europe or of trying to import it. Did you ever imagine that EU regulations would make life easier! Pah!
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
I bought my first car in Germany and sold it 5 years later to a back street garage in Peckham - the name wasn't Trotter either! The man said that he'd do the paperwork on my behalf. Mistake! 3 months after selling it I received a summons for non payment of a parking fine from a town that I have never been to. The buyer had not changed the ownership and I was bring lumbered with his misdemeanors. Fortunately a chap that I worked with wife worked in the Metropolitan Police ticket office and she was able to explain what I had to do to appeal. Changing ownership abroad must be a pain and I am sure that there's a little "let's make life difficult for the foreigner" too.
@zralte (4186)
• India
27 Feb 11
Well, I'm in India, let's see.... I don't know about legal requirements, but you don't actually have to have anything. I bought a second hand car from a Used car dealer 5 years ago, there was no requirements as such. I paid in cash - full, so I guess that took care of that. I chose the used car company because of their checking, but I know I paid a bit more for that. I don't mind really as the used car dealer gave 6 months warranty on it - that is free service. I am now planning to sell my husband's car. All I have to do is make sure the car is running smooth when potential buyer comes to check. And I do have insurance, but if the insurance is not there, it is not difficult to get a cheap one.
@p1kef1sh (45640)
27 Feb 11
Is insurance a legal requirement in India?
• India
2 Mar 11
Hello my friend p1kef1sh Ji, Well, we too have similar laws governing the issue as we are still following British rules on many subjects. However, it i sworth to go for brand new car, instead of srecond hand, if the car is not benificial to sellatr, how it could help buyer. Thanks. May God bless You and have a great time.