100% healthcare coverage with no cost to you

United States
February 28, 2011 10:35am CST
Do you have this sort of coverage? I've heard that government workers get this and even after retirement, especially Congress, etc. Do you think this is fair? Shouldn't tax payers get the same they are providing for others? Also if Congress had the same health coverage and retirement as everyone else, wouldn't they be more motivated to fix what ails these? Is this merely an urban myth, do you know? Or do state and government workers get 100% health care coverage, and at no cost to themselves?
3 people like this
8 responses
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
28 Feb 11
"Or do state and government workers get 100% health care coverage, and at no cost to themselves?" Depends on the state and government the person is working for. I've worked 5 different government jobs in 4 counties and 2 states. In each job the benefits were completely different. In my job as a Detention officer, employed by the state DJJ, the pay stunk, the insurance cost more than my private sector job at Universal Studios, and aside from a good deal on life insurance that I didn't need as a 23 year old, benefits were practically non-existent. Oh, and despite being a government agency they were more than happy to violate federal and state laws regarding overtime pay, inmate to guard ratios, and various other regulations that I won't go into detail with for sake of space. In 2 of the 3 library jobs I had in Florida (all county jobs)insurance was free for me, but very expensive to add my wife. She actually got a much better deal on her insurance through her school (more students should look at that). In Orange County Fl, I didn't have to pay social security and that was great. Instead I got to put money into a private retirement account and the library matched up to a certain amount. In Tampa, FL I paid for both myself and my wife to be on my insurance, but the cost was relatively cheap. In my library job in New Jersey insurance for my entire family was 100% free although currently it's a petty 1.5% of my annual salary, due to recent legislation pushed by Gov. Christie making employees contribute something to their insurance, which comes out to about $37 a month to cover my entire family. I could give you exact numbers on everything if you want, but the point is, benefits and insurance costs vary greatly from state to state and from county to county within each state. It's easy to look at federal numbers, but each state is different so there is no set standard to judge state employees by.
1 person likes this
@sid556 (31005)
• United States
28 Feb 11
Hi Flowerchilde, I've heard this too and it wouldn't surprise me. They don't seem to go without much of anything. I have 100% no healthcare coverage at no cost to me.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
5 Mar 11
In most parts of Texas, State Slaves, I mean State Employees, are not well paid. Sure, you go to small town Texas and you find it more than the private sector jobs, but it sure can't support a single person on their own well in the large cities - and Texas had Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth, Austin, San Antonio as large cities - Austin being the smallest of the 4 and STILL the 15th largest city in the U.S. So, health care is one of the perks they use to try and keep employees from getting on the job experience and then fleeing into the private sector. And some of those jobs can be pretty stressful too, or even dangerous!
@AmbiePam (49879)
• United States
1 Mar 11
That would be great to have. I do have some family members who have jobs that fall under government jobs, but their health care is not close to 100% and no cost to them. I really think that is a myth. Granted, they get good health care coverage - that's the truth. But they don't get it all paid for. Still, everyone knows if you want good health care coverage - get a government job. It's a shame we can't all have that.
@bdugas (3581)
• United States
1 Mar 11
No I do not think it is fair that the people in Washington do not have to abide by the same rules when it comes to insurance and retirement that the rest of us do, what makes them so special, and why is it good for me but not for them. I also believe if they had to work and abide by same rules governing insurance and retirement as the rest of us, then they wouldnt' be so quick at dropping programs that the rest of us need. Just because u are a senator or whatever makes you no better than I am digging a ditch. It is a job, Washington people seem to put their selves above the other people, and this health care plan is so right as long as it doesn't have to effect them.
@celticeagle (119060)
• Boise, Idaho
1 Mar 11
I once saw a list of things that government employees in Washington received. THey used to be able to vote for their own bonuses and raises. I don't know if this is still the case but it used to be. I think it is idiotic. I know that the president continues to get health coverage and a pension after he leaves the oval office.
@anniepa (27238)
• United States
1 Mar 11
Lol...there are probably thousands of state and federal workers who wish this urban legend were true but it's not, it's just a myth. Even members of Congress have to pay something for their health insurance, which varies depending on what plan they choose. There are many choices with different premiums, coverages, co-payments, etc. Actually, it's pretty much like what those who will be in the exchanges will get to choose from if the health care bill isn't repealed. Because it's a huge pool of people in the FEHBP the premiums are lower than one would pay if they purchased insurance as an individual or even were part of a much smaller group plan. Also because it's such a big group there is no exclusion for preexisting conditions, etc. Another myth is that members of Congress don't pay in to Social Security; the only ones who may not depending on their personal choices are those who were in office or government service prior to 1984. As for individual states, that would vary from state to state but I know in my state they have co-payments for everything and some workers pay part of their premiums and some don't. With teachers, it's determined by the individual school district. Annie
@Lakota12 (42684)
• United States
28 Feb 11
not sure about free but they do have difernt than the rest of us and keep it after out of office even thier wages the sentors and pres. do eep wages if they knew they woul ahve to work after their term they would really hange things uI am sure