Learn the language of the country you live in....

@flpoolbum (2462)
United States
March 7, 2011 9:35pm CST
If I were planning on moving to another country, one of the first things that I would do learn about the country and DEFINATELY LEARN THEIR PRIMARY LANGUAGE. I use to work with the public and from what I have seen, a lot Spanish speaking people in the United States, expect us (and our government agencies) to cater to them in Spanish! THIS IS RIDICULOUS! Like the old saying, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do..."
1 person likes this
14 responses
• Canada
8 Mar 11
I COMPLETELY AGREE!!!! I live in Canada and i find it frigging rediuclas that almost half are country doesn't speak English its the language you want to move here thats great but at least learn the language!! My grandparents moved here not knowing a word of English and within a year both had jobs and were fluent if they could do it why cants everyone else? We Canadians are way to catering to other cultures as we now can not say Christmas tree it might offend someone we have to say holiday tree this is our country our language and our customs you want to live here do not make us change our ways for you you don't have to practice are customs but do not be offended by us practicing are custom's in OUR country thats my opinion lol
@raineyes (561)
• United States
8 Mar 11
Same here in America. We can't even say Merry Christmas. It's 'happy holidays'. So what if I say Merry Christmas to someone who's Jewish? They should just laugh it off and tell me happy Hanukkah or say oh, I don't celebrate, and then I'll say my bad, happy Hanukkah or Kwanzaa or whatever you celebrate. And if you just don't celebrate holidays, why do you have to take mine away from me?
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
That is so true about the holidays. I started saying Happy Holidays, too. What really starts getting ridiculous is at Christmas time, some people now get offended by a Santa saying, "HO HO HO"! There was even people demanding it be changed. Those people who worry about something trivial like that must really have low self esteem or are feeling guilty about something. Anyway, I am going back to saying "Merry Christmas". If people want to respond with a "Happy Hanukkah" or "Happy Kwanzaa" that's cool with me.
@angel107 (311)
• Germany
8 Mar 11
Yes you have to learn the language but there are really people who are just too stubborn to do so. I live in Germany now and before I got here I did not speak a single german word because I want to study here. I learned the language. I think when you feel the need to learn the language, you will do it. have a nice day
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
Like they say, "When in Rome, do as the Romans do". Interesting enough, you can discover all kinds of different flavors and textures of food if you use the same idea when eating there. I can't imagine what I could have missed if I hadn't tried Gumbo when I was visiting New Orleans, Louisiana(USA). Life is an adventure, go out and savor it!
@KrauseHome (34982)
• United States
8 Mar 11
Well, as someone from the US, this is something that surprises me as well. Why when people move here to the US, do they expect us to cater to them in their language etc. instead of wanting to learn the language so they can talk with us as well. I work somewhere where a lot of the people are from Ethiopia and so they do not speak very much English and sometimes never consider where they are at when speaking as well. Overall, I really wish that they could make this more of a requirement for people to be required to speak English when coming to the US at least when around others here. It would definately make it a lot easier for everyone involved for sure. I know if I was to go to another country for any real length of time I would want to know the language somewhat so I would be able to communicate with them and feel right at home as well.
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
Really, I am of Finnish descent on both sides of my family. When I go to areas in the U. S. that are predominantly Finnish, like in some parts of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, I don't see billboards and signs in Finnish, they are in English. Actually, when you think about it, we Americans don't actually speak English, we speak American English. Sure we could get by if we visited England. However, we would think that some of the things (or way we pronounce things) that they say funny and they probably would, too. When my sister started dating her husband, he use to laugh at us for saying the word, "pank". It was just a word we learned from our parents. My wife laughs that I say, "w arm" not "war m". I get a kick out it when she says "cee ment" or "wrash". I joke that she should "wrash" the clothes in our "cee ment" pond like Granny Clampett use to do in the 1960's American sitcom, "The Beverly Hillbilly's". When you think about it language is such an interesting and fascinating thing.
@sizzle3000 (3040)
• United States
8 Mar 11
I agree with you so much. If we were to go to another country, we would have to learn the language. No one in the country would learn our language to help us in their country. But here in America we have to learn the language of the people that come over, which for now is spanish. I don't see where this is right but hey our wonderful government doesn't want to do anything about it. They just say come on over we'll accomadate you. I remember when learning a second language was a choice, now if you don't take spanish you're s.o.l.
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
I remember while riding a bus in Florida, someone was purposely giving incorrect advice to a person struggling with English. Luckily, some of us were able to figure out where the lady wanted to go and gave her the correct information.
• India
8 Mar 11
s u r right bcause whiout learning u cant dio any thing
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
Heck, we even have language differences in our own country. One day when heading home from a trip, I stopped to use the restroom at a welcome center as I entered the State of Georgia (USA). Some guy wrote, "Chris was hear!" on the door of the stall. I got a good laugh out of it. I took a picture of it and want to send it to Jay Leno of the Tonight Show.
• Philippines
8 Mar 11
I agree with you because communication is essential and learning the language of a foreign country would simply make you not left behind. I mean, you will be able to relate to them and better understand them. Language is a key towards interconnection with other fellows. Secondly, you can add up studying a brief background on their culture including their norms. Also, the law of that country..not entirely to a greater extent. But this will gear you up in order not to get in trouble..Just as the popular saying: " Ignorance of the law excuses no one.
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
That is an excellent point. I didn't even think about that. I am really glad that you mentioned that. I have always said that "a little paranoia is a good thing" and in this case it is true.
• Malaysia
8 Mar 11
I totally agree with you. In order to live in another country, the first things to do is indeed to learn their language. Not only learn to speak, but also learn to read so that we can be more independant, dun have to reply on somebody else to translate for us when we see all the sign boards at the roadside or in the shop. Also, if we know their language, then we will not get cheated...
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
As I have said before, learning to speak the local language of your new country is also a good way to protect yourself. Besides, whipping out the old language dictionary can sometimes lead to making some new friends.
@urbandekay (18312)
8 Mar 11
Yes indeed, and parents must have a duty to present their children at school in a state fit to be educated and that includes speaking the language of the country competently all the best urban
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
I have heard stories that young children often help their parents learn the new language of the country they moved to. Hey, they can learn it together and have some special time while doing it.
@raineyes (561)
• United States
8 Mar 11
I agree with you - but not out of ignorance or anything. I know a little Spanish - because I was forced to learn it. I live in America. I speak English. I am fluent in German - because I chose to learn German. I also think that even if you are just visiting another country, you should learn basic communication - manners, how to introduce yourself, ask basic questions, etc - just to be polite to their culture and language. They shouldn't have to learn English just to please us if we're going to be in their country. It's a respect thing. If you go to a foreign country, you should learn their etiquette and laws. Why should language be the exception?
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
Unfortunately, a lot of people are forgetting about the art of good etiquette. Why should a women be mad at me if I hold the door open for them? My Mom taught me to do that. I even will keep the door open for a guy, if he is close enough. Who wants a door slammed in their face? It's nice to be nice.
@dreamy1 (3815)
• United States
8 Mar 11
I used to live in Taiwan and before I left I got some Mandarin cd's and tried to learn. When I was there I had a tutor come to my apartment and teach me but I stopped because I got lazy I did try to learn when I got the chance. I was lucky that one of my roommates spoke Mandarin so that helped and I made friends with Taiwanese people who also spoke English so that was a big help. In the city it's very easy to get around without knowing the language because signs are also in English and also the train and buses announce stops in English. I knew people who lived there for years and didn't bother to learn because it was easy to live there without it but it made things a lot easier if you did know at least some of the language. I do agree that you should not expect any place to accommodate you that you should adapt to the environment. If I moved to France I will learn French although I'm sure a fair amount of people speak English there I would not expect them to accommodate me since I am the foreigner I should respect what is already established.
@flpoolbum (2462)
• United States
20 May 11
It is a good way to learn new things and expand your knowledge. It also tends to make life more interesting.
• China
18 Mar 11
Yes you are right before move any new country we should know the language of that country. Specially some words which is very important in life like toilet, foods name, bus,address and how to ask help from people.Then our journey become more easier and we can adjust our self with new place and can make friends very easily. Have a good time!
@asliah (11149)
• Philippines
18 Mar 11
hi, actually, i really love to know and how to use languages in many countries, and when i move to another country, the first thing i will do is to learn their language so that i can communicate with them with their own language.
@noorhizat (209)
• Malaysia
9 Mar 11
I have never moved to another country :) I do agree with u that when you move to a different country you should learn the language there for easy communication and make your life easy. apart from that I might add that learning the cultures there is also important. Here I we use at least 2 different language Malay and English. a lot of people use more than that plus Tamil or Mandarin or Cantonies some even use other sub dialect. To me it's rude not to learn the language of the area at least the basic. It might take some time but you must do it.
@asyria51 (2870)
• United States
9 Mar 11
I learned enough Japanese when I went to live in the country to survive. I learned to ask basic questions and the most common answers. There were places where people did not know any English, and we had to use a translation dictionary to communicate, but we did our best.