I once met a man who said, this is all a load of bull!

United States
March 25, 2011 4:24am CST
I was studying at a cafe one day, looking at a bunch of statistics for my sociology project. A man was watching me from another table, and asked me what I was doing. After I told him, he said "you know it's all a load of bs right?" I laughed because that was just what I had been thinking for the past few months. He continued on a rant.. "I have enough credits for a masters, and the one thing I learned from that is... professors will tell you what's true for them, but they won't tell you your own truth." Have you ever felt this way?
4 responses
@rasshion (47)
• United States
25 Mar 11
I felt that way all through my days in school! I actually used to get in trouble because I was constantly questioning methods and they had no answers for me. I wanted to do things my way because their way made no sense, and they didn't like that. I argued that if you come up with the same answers every time, why does it matter how you get there? Nope, they want you to do it their way and not think for yourself. So yeah, it is all a bunch of b.s.
• United States
25 Mar 11
It upsets me that teachers penalize students who don't follow the rules. This happens even in schools that claim to teach kids how to think critically.
@CJscott (4184)
• Canada
25 Mar 11
It seems to me, that school is a place where you are taught, WHAT to think rather then HOW to think. When you are taught WHAT to think, you know you need to work hard, study hard, get a good JOB, Spend as much as you earn, so you are never prepared for emergencies and stay a slave to an employer until you are 108. However, when you learn HOW to think, you can decide what is best for you, and how to achieve it, on your terms. Also, I heard a great quote once..."School is a place where A students teach B students how to work for C students." So, it is a little over rated, but learn all you can while you are there, knowledge is potential power after all. Sincerely and With Appreciation.
• United States
25 Mar 11
That makes sense, and then I would say the ones who drop out work on their own. Well, not always. I guess more than anything school teaches me patience, to deal with a bunch of annoying people.
@Joeyfish (239)
• United States
25 Mar 11
I think I understand what you're saying. When a teacher teaches, they read what the student should know in their manual and then they teach the kids what it is in the best way that they know. And in doing so, they teacher will more then likely tell you their point of view. I have been told that "it's not what you know, it's what the teacher wants to hear" Or something similar to that. I have had a couple teachers that were strong believers in God, and they taught earth science. And more then once they would combine their belief and science to explain things.
• United States
25 Mar 11
yes, most of the time I see a teacher-student relationship where the student is just trying to impress the teacher.
@BeetleBam (171)
• United States
13 Oct 11
I have felt like this. In high school I was told that college professors are more interested in teaching you how they want you to think than anything else.
@JenInTN (27568)
• United States
27 Mar 11
Thus the beauty of education..knowing the difference. I think that professors teach the norm...the proven...the already known or the theory of being that seems to be the best answer to a worldwide questionn..whatever...anyway..the thing they don't teach in some classes is thinking outside of the box. That is up to us. We have to take what we are taught and make it our own. Take that theory and prove it right or wrong or whatever the case may be. There are those that are educated and then there are those that use what they have learned.