ID to vote

@laglen (19783)
United States
April 11, 2011 9:28am CST
In Colorado, they are voting on requiring ID to vote. I live in Colorado, I have to show ID already, so I am not sure what the question is. But here are the two sides of the issue Democrats object to the Republican proposal and say it will disenfranchise voters. Republicans say the bill is necessary to make sure only U.S. citizens are voting. http://www.kdvr.com/news/kdvr-bill-seeking-citizenship-proof-to-vote-gets-initial-approval-in-colo-house-20110407,0,4453886.story?track=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+kdvr-news+%28KDVR+-+Local+News%29 The county I vote in already does this. I see plenty of people voting.I have never heard a citizen say they were scared to vote because they had to show ID. What do you think? In my opinion, you should be required through the whole country.
2 people like this
12 responses
• United States
15 Apr 11
In Georgia I already have to show my ID before I can vote. However I think any steps necessary should be taken to stop voter fraud and that includes illegals. I do not care if I have to show my ID ten times a day to qualify for any befits accorded to US citizens as I have nothing to hide.
2 people like this
• United States
15 Apr 11
oops s/r "benefits"
2 people like this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
16 Apr 11
I agree, most CITIZENS and thinking people have no problem showing their id to vote or receive benefits.
1 person likes this
• United States
16 Apr 11
You got that right. It is by no means an inconvenience. I've never understood how people could leave their driver's license at home. If a person is going somewhere, he or she is usually going to take money. Money (paper or plastic) is almost always stored in some kind of wallet or purse, and for the last 50 years they've had little slots specifically for driver's licenses. It's like the wallet makers are making it easy for us. Whodathunk?
2 people like this
@matersfish (6311)
• United States
11 Apr 11
I can't believe it already isn't a requirement. I heard the BS a few weeks ago about how this was racist and targeting minorities. How insulting! Are they saying that minorities can't have an ID? Is asking for an ID "culturally biased"? Go pay your five bucks and stand in line at the DMV for 2 hours like the rest of us, whoever you are! Oh, you don't have any mail, a SS number, school records, employment records or any other documentation with your name on it? Okay. Then you're probably illegal anyway and should sign in or GTFO. Voting being a right shouldn't mean that anyone off the street can walk into a polling outfight and cast a vote without proof of who they are! Not when we have probably 50 million illegals running around and millions of people who would outright cheat to vote in any way possible. This is a good thing for the system in general. Forget the "party" nonsense.
1 person likes this
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
11 Apr 11
He wait a minute masterfish...our prez don't have to show any of those things, why should we?
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Apr 11
Hell of a standard to set!
1 person likes this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
12 Apr 11
maters - I agree. And if they are legal citizens, if they are homeless, how likely are they to vote anyway? Debra - great point!
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
12 Apr 11
I have no problem with showing a photo ID to vote. I have to show one when I cash a check, apply for a job (2 forms), board a plane, visit a national monument, and many state and Federal; Buildings. So why not to vote. In the 2008 election Wisconsin and Minnesota caught several college students voting in MN with a MN ID and then voting in WI with a utility bill (same day registration and voting).
1 person likes this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
12 Apr 11
Here you have to register in advance. These are simple requirements. If you cant remember that there will be an election in two months, you most likely dont even know who is running or why.
@laglen (19783)
• United States
13 Apr 11
How can they know I am not voting in your name?
• United States
16 Apr 11
I've wondered that. Show up in the morning dressed in business clothes and vote for yourself, then show up again an hour later dressed casually and vote as your neighbor, then show up at shift change dressed one way and vote as your workaholic boss, then change clothes and vote again as someone else. I'm sure it happens, and with these small-time elections I'm sure few people notice or care.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Apr 11
Yes they should prove who they are to vote and be marked off as voting. This isn't just because of illegals voting (which is a large base of Democratic votes illegal ones) but was put in effect to stop people who would vote over and over again stuffing the ballet box. This is a law that the democrats are trying to fixate on to take the heat off of their failing president.
1 person likes this
@avonrep1 (1863)
• United States
11 Apr 11
I don't consider myself Democrat or a Republican, I consider myself an American voter. I have to disagree with your comments about democrats, the main reason why is lets look at Bush, he never won the popular vote either election. But he was still President. He's a republican not a democrat. Speaking of which that is partly what is wrong with out country, Political parties that mud sling on fellow citizens. It is wrong and when I see people doing stuff like this it makes me sick.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Apr 11
I do not claim to be one or the other party in fact if you look back at my posts you would see I slam both sides very often. Just in this case I agree with the republicans in that people should show proof of who they are to vote. Illegal is illegal and they should not be permitted to vote in our countries anything. The Democrats know that with all their talk of helping illegals if no one checks to see if the voters are nationals they will have many illegal votes and no proof to say if they are or not. As for Bush or Obama that is not what this is actually about. I think many Democrats see that who they have in power right now is not living up to even the standards of many of their own. I also think to take some of the light off of issues such as budget,Libya,economy they will push lesser issues into the light. It is politics after all and that is what they do, all of them, smoke and mirrors. I personally believe both parties should be dissolved letting people not affiliated with money funding parties into the spot light so that we the people can vote for someone who might actually figure out a way to make this mess better. I have yet to see in my life time a president that actually makes me proud to be an American and that is men from both parties.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Apr 11
@Avonrep-- Read your Constitution. Presidential elections are decided by the Electoral College, not by popular vote. In fact, in addition to the 2000 elections, the 1876 and 1888 elections went to the candidate with fewer popular votes too. If you don't like it, lobby your representative to introduce an amendment to the Consitution abolishing the Electoral college. It's been tried before, obviously unsuccessfully, several times. Who knows though, maybe this time it'll pass. As far as mud slinging on the other party, Pot meet Kettle, deal with the log in your eye before the mote in mine, pick your cliche. Both parties do it, but in my experience the Republicans do it less.
1 person likes this
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
12 Apr 11
That statement from the democrats, "It will disenfranchise voters," proves they are willing to cheat in order to win. Showing ID does not disenfranchise anyone who has the legal right to vote, only those who do not. It's a shame ethics and integrity don't seem to be a part of the democrat party.
1 person likes this
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
12 Apr 11
I agree. Voter fraud and disenfranchising voters is a Democrat specialty. Read the history of Reconstruction and what happened when the Democrats got back in power afterwards.
1 person likes this
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
12 Apr 11
And then there's ACORN. Read the Cloward Pivens Strategy as well. Get as many signed up for welfare as possible and the flood the voting booths with welfare recipients, get undocumented aliens to the polls. They have had this all planned from the earliest days of our the last century. Social change isn't a new idea Obama came up with in 2008. He's well aware of the STRATEGY.
2 people like this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
13 Apr 11
He is right on track in that strategy as well.
@avonrep1 (1863)
• United States
11 Apr 11
Yes I think it should be required. Use to be you had a voter ID card but they didn't have photos on them. With Identity theft a new issue, we should have a requirement of showing ID. Now I have to make a comment to people who are saying stupid stuff. How many times does it have to be proven that Obama was born in Hawaii? Shoot I didn't hear this much complaining when Bush didn't win the popular vote and still became President. If you can prove Obama isn't a born citizen of the US prove it, if not stop spreading rumors, it makes American's look uniformed and ignorant. It also makes America seem racist. Don't even know how Obama got brought into this discussion about if ID should be shown when we go and vote. I am also kind of strange, I think everyone who is over 18 should be made to vote or be fined, like they do in Australia. Why do I think this, well its simple really. We are a democracy or we are suppose to be, but when only 20% of people are making the decisions we don't have a true democracy.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Apr 11
There was much complaining, and I still see bumper stickers lamenting his election 11 years later. As for Obama, he hasn't proved anything. The records are sealed (if they exist) so nobody can be certain. We can't prove anything one way or the other until we see hard evidence. If he's got nothing to hide, why not let it out in the open? He's acting like a liar, and that keeps the birthers going.
1 person likes this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
12 Apr 11
mrcool, thank you again. sheesh, I go to work and all hell breaks out in my discussion! lol thank you
@bestboy19 (5482)
• United States
12 Apr 11
Avonrep1, we are not a democracy. We are a republic.
@Taskr36 (13928)
• United States
11 Apr 11
Democrats seem to have the monopoly on voter fraud so they'll continue to do everything in their power to make sure it continues. I have NEVER seen a democrat do anything to PREVENT voter fraud.
1 person likes this
@avonrep1 (1863)
• United States
11 Apr 11
President Bush is a republican not a democrat and he never won the popular vote, I consider that voter fraud. Its both parties not just one or the other. The problem is people are not informed and only 20% normally go out and vote. I think the 2008 elections got people to be out spoken about things that in reality has been going on because of one thing. Color of the skin. Racism is alive and well in this country. People have been committing voter fraud since voting started. ID's will stop some of this, but all it means is that people will find another new way to fraud the government and the people.
1 person likes this
@Taskr36 (13928)
• United States
11 Apr 11
The popular vote has NEVER been a requirement to be elected president. The electoral college process is clearly spelled out in the Constitution. Sadly, it seems you have no idea what voter fraud is. I'll spell it out for you. Voter fraud is when someone votes illegally. It can happen by voting more than once, voting in areas you are not allowed to vote in, voting when you do not have the right to vote either by age, or by losing that right, or voting under another person's name. Those are just a few.
2 people like this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
12 Apr 11
Taskr, thank you for clarifying for avonrep. Also see above where mrcool explains the Constitutional facts of the electoral college.
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
11 Apr 11
Geeesh...don't need a birth certificate to be President and don't need an ID to vote. How clever of those liberals. I live in Missouri and didn't need an ID to vote. Didn't need one to register to vote either. I had my registration card ready and they didn't even ask for it at the polls.
1 person likes this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
12 Apr 11
wow - so um er, vote early and vote often eh?
@debrakcarey (19925)
• United States
15 Apr 11
@Pimento (28)
11 Apr 11
I think that having ID to vote is a great idea. One vote per person makes things fair, and that would do a lot to stop people who want to stuff the ballot box in favor of any candidate. I think the right to vote is one of the greatest rights, and requiring ID just protects this right for all of us who are eligible to vote.
1 person likes this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
12 Apr 11
I agree completely!
• United States
11 Apr 11
I need a government issued ID to drive, how much more important is voting than driving? Having an ID is not racist. Everyone has to have one, and the only place to get one is the DMV. Everyone has to wait in line for hours, from rich capitalist to dirt-poor socialist freeloader. One could argue that requiring IDs is the Great Equalizer. Bring it on, it won't inconvenience me at the polls. I had to drive to get there, right?
1 person likes this
@laglen (19783)
• United States
12 Apr 11
great point. I have had to produce one here for the last 13 years. I have had no problem with it.
@suspenseful (40326)
• Canada
11 Apr 11
With all this identity theft and the illegals pretending to be citizens, you should have to show your id. In Canada, we have a system where registered voters get notifications and have to sign with our own signature to get a ballot to vote. So any method who wants to show the person who is voting is is really that one.
@laglen (19783)
• United States
12 Apr 11
we get voter registration cards too, but our polling places require a photo id.
• Canada
29 Aug 11
I have no problem showing ID when I vote. My issue is that I don't have a drivers license because I'm legally blind. I have a card from the Canadian national institute for the blind, and I wish they'd accept that in lieu of a license.